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New Ap6 Record

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  • kraDen
    Hi All (19303382 + $n*41724940)*5011#+1 (n=0-5) describes an AP6 of 2152-2153 digit primes. cheers Ken Primality testing (19303382 + 0*41724940)*5011#+1 [N-1,
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 17, 2009
      Hi All

      (19303382 + $n*41724940)*5011#+1 (n=0-5) describes an AP6 of 2152-2153 digit primes.

      cheers
      Ken


      Primality testing (19303382 + 0*41724940)*5011#+1 [N-1, Brillhart-Lehmer-Selfridge]
      Running N-1 test using base 2
      Calling Brillhart-Lehmer-Selfridge with factored part 33.43%
      (19303382 + 0*41724940)*5011#+1 is prime! (1.6747s+0.0019s)
      Primality testing (19303382 + 1*41724940)*5011#+1 [N-1, Brillhart-Lehmer-Selfridge]
      Running N-1 test using base 2
      Calling Brillhart-Lehmer-Selfridge with factored part 33.44%
      (19303382 + 1*41724940)*5011#+1 is prime! (1.6605s+0.0017s)
      Primality testing (19303382 + 2*41724940)*5011#+1 [N-1, Brillhart-Lehmer-Selfridge]
      Running N-1 test using base 2
      Calling Brillhart-Lehmer-Selfridge with factored part 33.49%
      (19303382 + 2*41724940)*5011#+1 is prime! (1.6666s+0.0018s)
      Primality testing (19303382 + 3*41724940)*5011#+1 [N-1, Brillhart-Lehmer-Selfridge]
      Running N-1 test using base 2
      Calling Brillhart-Lehmer-Selfridge with factored part 33.43%
      (19303382 + 3*41724940)*5011#+1 is prime! (1.6531s+0.0018s)
      Primality testing (19303382 + 4*41724940)*5011#+1 [N-1, Brillhart-Lehmer-Selfridge]
      Running N-1 test using base 2
      Calling Brillhart-Lehmer-Selfridge with factored part 33.48%
      (19303382 + 4*41724940)*5011#+1 is prime! (1.6634s+0.0017s)
      Primality testing (19303382 + 5*41724940)*5011#+1 [N-1, Brillhart-Lehmer-Selfridge]
      Running N-1 test using base 2
      Calling Brillhart-Lehmer-Selfridge with factored part 33.43%
      (19303382 + 5*41724940)*5011#+1 is prime! (1.6680s+0.0019s)
    • mikeoakes2
      ... Congrats, Ken! (We are playing leap-frog on this one:-) Did you sieve k=1..250million, or what? Any other stats on your run? -Mike Oakes
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 18, 2009
        --- In primeform@yahoogroups.com, "kraDen" <kradenken@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi All
        >
        > (19303382 + $n*41724940)*5011#+1 (n=0-5) describes an AP6 of 2152-2153 digit primes.
        >

        Congrats, Ken!
        (We are playing leap-frog on this one:-)

        Did you sieve k=1..250million, or what?
        Any other stats on your run?

        -Mike Oakes
      • Jens Kruse Andersen
        ... Congratulations. http://users.cybercity.dk/~dsl522332/math/aprecords.htm is updated with the assumption that NewPGen and PrimeForm were used again. -- Jens
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 18, 2009
          Ken wrote:
          > (19303382 + $n*41724940)*5011#+1 (n=0-5) describes an AP6
          > of 2152-2153 digit primes.

          Congratulations.
          http://users.cybercity.dk/~dsl522332/math/aprecords.htm is updated
          with the assumption that NewPGen and PrimeForm were used again.

          --
          Jens Kruse Andersen
        • kraDen
          Hi Mike, ... sieved n=100,000,000-200,000,000 to 10^12 30,873,079 tests 306917 prps 147359 ap4s 335 ap5s 0 ap6s extended ap5 s (up 77 and down 70) no ap6
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 18, 2009
            Hi Mike,

            --- In primeform@yahoogroups.com, "mikeoakes2" <mikeoakes2@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In primeform@yahoogroups.com, "kraDen" <kradenken@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi All
            > >
            > > (19303382 + $n*41724940)*5011#+1 (n=0-5) describes an AP6 of 2152-2153 digit primes.
            > >
            >
            > Congrats, Ken!
            > (We are playing leap-frog on this one:-)
            >
            > Did you sieve k=1..250million, or what?
            > Any other stats on your run?

            sieved n=100,000,000-200,000,000 to 10^12
            30,873,079 tests
            306917 prps
            147359 ap4s
            335 ap5s
            0 ap6s
            extended ap5's (up 77 and down 70) no ap6
            extended ap4's (up 36,660 and down 37,209) no ap6
            Modified C++ program to extend all ap3s up and down
            gave 48,197,836 chances at an ap4
            after newpgening, prping and combining with originals had
            416840 prps
            325635 ap4s
            764 ap5s
            0 ap6s
            Thankfully extending the ap4s this time yielded the desired result

            > -Mike Oakes
            >

            cheers
            Ken

            p.s.
            I'm currently attempting to rewrite my C++ code in assembler. when/if I succeed
            (am having fun (trouble) with the file I/O and array referencing at the moment)
            I hope to attack some aps > 10 in length
          • djbroadhurst
            ... Watch this space, folks. Mike s code is already rather nifty; Ken s might get even niftier. Per ardua ad astra David
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 18, 2009
              --- In primeform@yahoogroups.com,
              "kraDen" <kradenken@...> wrote:

              > I'm currently attempting to rewrite my C++ code in assembler.

              Watch this space, folks. Mike's code is already rather nifty;
              Ken's might get even niftier.

              Per ardua ad astra

              David
            • mikeoakes2
              ... Thanks for posting those details, Ken. You were unlucky not to get an AP6 straight off, weren t you? 335 AP5s should have been enough. (Poisson up to his
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 21, 2009
                --- In primeform@yahoogroups.com, "kraDen" <kradenken@...> wrote:
                >
                > sieved n=100,000,000-200,000,000 to 10^12
                > 30,873,079 tests
                > 306917 prps
                > 147359 ap4s
                > 335 ap5s
                > 0 ap6s
                > extended ap5's (up 77 and down 70) no ap6
                > extended ap4's (up 36,660 and down 37,209) no ap6
                > Modified C++ program to extend all ap3s up and down
                > gave 48,197,836 chances at an ap4
                > after newpgening, prping and combining with originals had
                > 416840 prps
                > 325635 ap4s
                > 764 ap5s
                > 0 ap6s
                > Thankfully extending the ap4s this time yielded the desired result
                >

                Thanks for posting those details, Ken.
                You were unlucky not to get an AP6 straight off, weren't you? 335 AP5s should have been enough. (Poisson up to his tricks again:-)

                BTW won't you be submitting your primes to Chris's Top-20 AP page
                http://primes.utm.edu/top20/page.php?id=14
                ?

                Mike
              • kraDen
                ... Yes, I think I was unlucky. Especailly since I extended all the ap4 s and 5 s ... Oops! forgot all about that. thanks ... cheers ken
                Message 7 of 7 , Nov 22, 2009
                  --- In primeform@yahoogroups.com, "mikeoakes2" <mikeoakes2@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In primeform@yahoogroups.com, "kraDen" <kradenken@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > sieved n=100,000,000-200,000,000 to 10^12
                  > > 30,873,079 tests
                  > > 306917 prps
                  > > 147359 ap4s
                  > > 335 ap5s
                  > > 0 ap6s
                  > > extended ap5's (up 77 and down 70) no ap6
                  > > extended ap4's (up 36,660 and down 37,209) no ap6
                  > > Modified C++ program to extend all ap3s up and down
                  > > gave 48,197,836 chances at an ap4
                  > > after newpgening, prping and combining with originals had
                  > > 416840 prps
                  > > 325635 ap4s
                  > > 764 ap5s
                  > > 0 ap6s
                  > > Thankfully extending the ap4s this time yielded the desired result
                  > >
                  >
                  > Thanks for posting those details, Ken.
                  > You were unlucky not to get an AP6 straight off, weren't you? 335 AP5s should have been enough. (Poisson up to his tricks again:-)
                  Yes, I think I was unlucky. Especailly since I extended all the ap4's and 5's
                  > BTW won't you be submitting your primes to Chris's Top-20 AP page
                  > http://primes.utm.edu/top20/page.php?id=14
                  > ?
                  Oops! forgot all about that.
                  thanks
                  >
                  > Mike
                  >

                  cheers
                  ken
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