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Brazil introduces plan to expand Security Council

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  • Greg Cannon
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/worldlatest/story/0,1280,-5134452,00.html Brazil Introduces U.N. Council Reform Plan Tuesday July 12, 2005 3:16 AM By NICK WADHAMS
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 11, 2005
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      http://www.guardian.co.uk/worldlatest/story/0,1280,-5134452,00.html

      Brazil Introduces U.N. Council Reform Plan

      Tuesday July 12, 2005 3:16 AM

      By NICK WADHAMS

      Associated Press Writer

      UNITED NATIONS (AP) - Brazil formally introduced a
      proposal to reform the Security Council on Monday, a
      move that could bring the United Nations a step closer
      to ending a decade-long debate about the composition
      of its most powerful body.

      Yet the negative response the draft resolution drew
      from a familiar group of opponents underscored just
      how divided the United Nations remains.

      Nearly all the 191 U.N. member states agree that the
      15-nation council in its current form is an
      anachronism of the post-World War II era, no longer an
      accurate reflection of the world's landscape of power.
      But so far there's been no agreement on how to change
      it.

      The proposal from Brazil, Japan, Germany and India
      would expand the council from 15 to 25 members, adding
      six permanent seats without veto power and four
      non-permanent seats. Those four each want a permanent
      seat, with the other two earmarked for Africa.

      The so-called group of four could seek a vote on its
      proposal as early as the end of the week.

      Brazil's U.N. Ambassador Ronaldo Mota Sardenberg
      repeated his supporters' main arguments - that any
      other proposals won't correct the council's balance.

      ``As for the argument that working to bring this issue
      to a conclusion after 12 years of discussion is
      somehow still premature, we can only consider it
      beguiling,'' Sardenberg said.

      Opponents of the idea retorted with their argument:
      that the so-called Group of Four's bid is nothing more
      than a bid for power.

      ``The seekers of special privileges and power
      masquerade as the champions of the weak and
      disadvantaged, asserting that the special privileges
      that they seek would make the council more
      representative and neutral,'' said Pakistan's U.N.
      Ambassador Munir Akram.

      Akram is a leading proponent of an alternate proposal,
      from a group calling itself ``Uniting for Consensus.''
      Their proposal would add only non-permanent members
      who would face periodic election.

      The intensity of the debate has only heated up since
      March, when U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said he
      wanted a decision on council expansion before
      September, when world leaders will gather at the
      United Nations for a summit.
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