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Fwd: U.S. Encouraged by Vietnam Vote: Officials Cite 83% Turnout

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  • Greg Cannon
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 31, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      --- julieannkeller <jakeller@...> wrote:

      > To: utepprogressives@yahoogroups.com
      > From: "julieannkeller" <jakeller@...>
      > Date: Mon, 31 Jan 2005 17:44:45 -0000
      > Subject: [utepprogressives] U.S. Encouraged by
      > Vietnam Vote: Officials Cite 83% Turnout
      >
      >
      > [Note from Julie - I need to clarify that I am
      > pleased that so many
      > people in Iraq got to vote yesterday, even if our
      > media appeared to
      > be cheerleading for Bush as usual and not many
      > people in the cities
      > or the Sunnis actually voted. But you've got to
      > love The Daily Kos
      > for digging this up. It's spooky.]
      >
      > U.S. Encouraged by Vietnam Vote:
      > Officials Cite 83% Turnout Despite Vietcong Terror
      >
      > by Peter Grose, Special to the New York Times
      > (9/4/1967: p. 2)
      >
      > WASHINGTON, Sept. 3-- United States officials were
      > surprised and
      > heartened today at the size of turnout in South
      > Vietnam's
      > presidential election despite a Vietcong terrorist
      > campaign to
      > disrupt the voting.
      >
      > According to reports from Saigon, 83 per cent of the
      > 5.85 million
      > registered voters cast their ballots yesterday.
      > Many of them risked
      > reprisals threatened by the Vietcong.
      >
      > The size of the popular vote and the inability of
      > the Vietcong to
      > destroy the election machinery were the two salient
      > facts in a
      > preliminary assessment of the nation election based
      > on the incomplete
      > returns reaching here.
      >
      > Pending more detailed reports, neither the State
      > Department nor the
      > White House would comment on the balloting or the
      > victory of the
      > military candidates, Lieut. Gen. Nguyen Van Thieu,
      > who was running
      > for president, and Premier Nguyen Cao Ky, the
      > candidate for vice
      > president.
      >
      > A successful election has long been seen as the
      > keystone in President
      > Johnson's policy of encouraging the growth of
      > constitutional
      > processes in South Vietnam. The election was the
      > culmination of a
      > constitutional development that began in January,
      > 1966, to which
      > President Johnson gave his personal commitment when
      > he met Premier Ky
      > and General Thieu, the chief of state, in Honolulu
      > in February.
      >
      > The purpose of the voting was to give legitimacy to
      > the Saigon
      > Government, which has been founded only on coups and
      > power plays
      > since November, 1963, when President Ngo Dinh Deim
      > was overthrown by
      > a military junta.
      >
      > Few members of that junta are still around, most
      > having been ousted
      > or exiled in subsequent shifts of power.
      >
      > Significance Not Diminished
      >
      > The fact that the backing of the electorate has gone
      > to the generals
      > who have been ruling South Vietnam for the last two
      > years does not,
      > in the Administration's view, diminish the
      > significance of the
      > constitutional step that has been taken.
      >
      > The hope here is that the new government will be
      > able to maneuver
      > with a confidence and legitimacy long lacking in
      > South Vietnamese
      > politics. That hope could have been dashed either
      > by a small
      > turnout, indicating widespread scorn or a lack of
      > interest in
      > constitutional development, or by the Vietcong's
      > disruption of the
      > balloting.
      >
      > More at:
      > http://www.dailykos.com/story/2005/1/31/2335/87390
      >
      >
      >
      >
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