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something odd from the civil war

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  • Greg Cannon
    check out this site http://www.moneyfactory.com/document.cfm/5/44/102 Apparently during the Civil War there was a serious shortage of coins so the Treasury
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 26, 2005
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      check out this site
      http://www.moneyfactory.com/document.cfm/5/44/102

      Apparently during the Civil War there was "a serious
      shortage of coins" so the Treasury printed paper notes
      for currencies that are normally on coins. There were
      notes for 3 cents, 5 cents, 10 cents, 15 cents, 25
      cents, and 50 cents. Does anyone have any idea who
      some of the pictures on the notes are of? Two are of
      George Washington, but I don't recognize these other
      faces:

      http://www.moneyfactory.com/document.cfm/5/60/169
      http://www.moneyfactory.com/document.cfm/5/60/171
      http://www.moneyfactory.com/document.cfm/5/60/172
      http://www.moneyfactory.com/document.cfm/5/60/173
    • greg
      elsewhere on the site i found an explanation of some of those pictures: http://www.moneyfactory.com/document.cfm/18/114 Other Facts About Portraits An
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 26, 2005
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        elsewhere on the site i found an explanation of some of those pictures:
        http://www.moneyfactory.com/document.cfm/18/114
        Other Facts About Portraits

        An interesting story is attached to the third general issue of
        fractional currency and the suppression of the 15-cent Grant and
        Sherman note. The issue was responsible for two Acts of Congress and
        the authorization for coinage of the 5-cent nickel piece.

        The story is that L.M. Clark, Chief of the Bureau of Engraving and
        Printing, selected himself for distinction by having his likeness
        appear on the 5-cent note. The version is that Mr. Clark ordered that
        the portrait of Francis E. Spinner, Treasurer of the United States, be
        placed on the 50-cent note without consulting him. Spinner was pleased
        with it, and as he had authority to select portraits on new notes,
        approved of it. Other designs were selected at random; and when it
        came to issuing the 5-cent note, Spinner was asked whose portrait was
        to be selected. Mr. Clark remarked, "How would the likeness of Clark
        do?" Excellent," said Spinner, thinking that reference was made to
        Freeman Clark, the Comptroller of the Currency. The matter escaped
        further notice until the notes had been printed in enormous
        quantities. This caused so much uncomplimentary criticism that it
        resulted in an Act of Congress being passed (April 7, 1866) which
        prohibited the use of portraits of any living persons. In the interim,
        the 15-cent Grant and Sherman note had been prepared, but the act
        prohibited its issue. To get the Clark 5-cent notes out of the way, an
        issue of 5-cent nickels was provided for by the May 16, 1866 Act of
        Congress. This act also prohibited the manufacture of paper currency
        in denominations less than 10-cents.
        --- In prezveepsenator@yahoogroups.com, Greg Cannon <gregcannon1@y...>
        wrote:
        > check out this site
        > http://www.moneyfactory.com/document.cfm/5/44/102
        >
        > Apparently during the Civil War there was "a serious
        > shortage of coins" so the Treasury printed paper notes
        > for currencies that are normally on coins. There were
        > notes for 3 cents, 5 cents, 10 cents, 15 cents, 25
        > cents, and 50 cents. Does anyone have any idea who
        > some of the pictures on the notes are of? Two are of
        > George Washington, but I don't recognize these other
        > faces:
        >
        > http://www.moneyfactory.com/document.cfm/5/60/169
        > http://www.moneyfactory.com/document.cfm/5/60/171
        > http://www.moneyfactory.com/document.cfm/5/60/172
        > http://www.moneyfactory.com/document.cfm/5/60/173
      • Ram Lau
        http://www.harrybassfoundation.org/basscatalogs/BASSSALE1/b1-1-c.htm Here you go, Greg. Lots of stories about the rare bank notes. Ram
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 31, 2005
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          http://www.harrybassfoundation.org/basscatalogs/BASSSALE1/b1-1-c.htm

          Here you go, Greg. Lots of stories about the rare bank notes.

          Ram
        • greg
          Thanks, Ram. Lots of odd old money on that site.
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 1, 2005
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            Thanks, Ram. Lots of odd old money on that site.
            --- In prezveepsenator@yahoogroups.com, "Ram Lau" <ramlau@y...> wrote:
            >
            > http://www.harrybassfoundation.org/basscatalogs/BASSSALE1/b1-1-c.htm
            >
            > Here you go, Greg. Lots of stories about the rare bank notes.
            >
            > Ram
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