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As AP projects Perry the winner, some caveats about history

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  • Greg Cannon
    http://www.statesman.com/blogs/content/shared-gen/blogs/austin/election/index.html As AP projects Perry the winner, some caveats about history By W. Gardner
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 2, 2010
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      http://www.statesman.com/blogs/content/shared-gen/blogs/austin/election/index.html

      As AP projects Perry the winner, some caveats about history
      By W. Gardner Selby | Tuesday, November 2, 2010, 08:34 PM

      As noted by my colleague Corrie MacLaggan, the Associated Press projects Rick Perry as the winner of the governor’s race.
      Perry makes history by winning a third four-year term. However, sometimes this accomplishment gets overstated. Perry is the third Texan elected to a third term as governor. John Connally won his third (two-year) term in 1966 before not running again in 1968. Allan Shivers won three two-year terms in the 1950’s. Both were Democrats at a time Republicans (aside from Professor John Tower) didn’t seriously compete statewide.
      Legal note: There is no Texas state constitutional limit on the number of terms that a governor may seek.
      Political note: Klieg lights loom (presuming klieg lights still exist), as Perry pitches himself on the national stage, potentially as a presidential or vice presidential aspirant (never mind all those instances of Perry disavowing any interest in spending 24/7 in Washington). The American-Statesman’s Jason Embry Tweeted Monday that Perry is already angling to appear on Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show,” hosted by Jon Stewart.
      Earlier, the Texas Tribune’s editor-in-motion, Evan Smith, speculated on Perry peeling off presidential — see his New York Times muse here. I’d have added one line o’ speculation, about Perry running again for governor in 2014. That’s an established pattern.
      Personal note: If Perry serves out his term, he’ll have been guv for 14 of my younger daughter’s 16 years of life. It’d be interesting to know how many Texas parents can make similarly dramatic projections.
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