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Fw: fns_nmsu-l] FNS: Mexican Politicos Urge Drastic Measures

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  • Greg Cannon
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 4, 2010
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      --- On Wed, 2/3/10, fnsnews@... <fnsnews@...> wrote:

      > From: fnsnews@... <fnsnews@...>
      > Subject: fns_nmsu-l] FNS: Mexican Politicos Urge Drastic Measures
      > To: fns_nmsu-l@...
      > Date: Wednesday, February 3, 2010, 6:44 PM
      > February 3, 2010
      >
      > Security News
      >
      > Politicians Propose Drastic Measures
      >
      > Sharp debate over the direction of Mexico’s narco war has
      > broken out in
      > the wake of twin massacres in northern Mexico last weekend.
      > As the death
      > toll from the narco violence punctures past records, some
      > political
      > leaders propose drastic responses that could curb civil
      > liberties.
      >
      > In the northern Mexican city of Torreon, Coahuila, Mayor
      > Eduardo Olmos
      > urged citizens to avoid going out at night unless they had
      > urgent business.
      > Olmos’ warning followed an attack against a nightclub
      > complex that left
      > eight people and 41 others reportedly injured; initial
      > reports indicated
      > the victims were mostly between 19 and 23 years of age. In
      > memory of the
      > victims, Olmos appealed on clubs to close their doors this
      > coming weekend.
      >
      > On Monday, February 1, Torreon was once again the scene of
      > bloodshed. A
      > shoot-out between the Mexican Army and Federal Police and
      > one side and
      > suspected drug cartel gunmen on the other resulted in the
      > deaths of seven
      > suspects. Three officers and one soldier were reported
      > wounded, while an
      > injured suspect was taken into custody by authorities.
      > Officials also
      > announced two kidnap victims were rescued from the criminal
      > group. Audible
      > at a nearby shopping center, the armed showdown provoked
      > public panic.
      >
      > In Mexico City, meanwhile, finger-pointing, recrimination
      > and accusations
      > of corruption characterized the political response to last
      > weekend’s
      > massacre of 16 people, mainly teenagers, at a party in
      > Ciudad Juarez’s
      > Villas de Salvarcar neighbourhood, the site of previous
      > narco-executions.
      >
      > A member of President Felipe Calderon’s National Action
      > Party (PAN),
      > Congresswoman Antonieta Perez Reyes of Ciudad Juarez said
      > serious thought
      > should be given to ordering a curfew in the border city.
      > “A curfew should
      > be considered now more than ever,” Perez declared.
      >
      > Although many shootings in Ciudad Juarez have occurred in
      > broad daylight
      > and in heavily-transited places, Perez did not say whether
      > a curfew should
      > apply round-the-clock.
      >
      > On a similar note, PAN Senator Guillermo Tamborel of
      > Queretaro proposed a
      > “state of exception” for Ciudad Juarez, but did not
      > give any specifics
      > other than to say that drugs should not be legalized or the
      > death penalty
      > enacted.
      >
      > After a sometimes heated debate this week, Mexico’s
      > Chamber of Deputies
      > passed a resolution to make Ciudad Juarez a national
      > priority. The
      > legislators backed a new policy of crime prevention that
      > would
      > “reconstruct the social fabric and increase the
      > efficiency of
      > governments.”
      >
      > Touring Japan, President Calderon pledged his
      > administration will unveil a
      > new comprehensive crime-fighting campaign in the coming
      > days. In March
      > 2007, the Calderon government also announced a
      > comprehensive anti-crime
      > strategy which, among other things, promised a focus on
      > combating Mexico’s
      > growing problem of drug addiction.
      >
      > Nearly three years later, drug-related violence shows no
      > signs of
      > subsiding. Indeed, nearly 1,000 narco-executions last month
      > wracked up a
      > record monthly toll.
      >
      > In Ciudad Juarez, state and municipal governments have also
      > previously
      > rolled out drastic crime prevention measures. In the late
      > 1990s, the
      > administration of Governor Patricio Martinez unveiled a
      > “No Tolerance”
      > policy by reducing bar hours and the times stores could
      > sell alcoholic
      > beverages. In subsequent years, however, homicide and other
      > violent crimes
      > surpassed all previous records.
      >
      > In 2007 the administration of then-Mayor Hector “Teto”
      > Murguia tried to
      > implement a youth curfew, but the measure was later dropped
      > after
      > complaints of police harassment directed against young
      > people. Similar to
      > the Ciudad Juarez experiment, youth curfews were also
      > enacted in different
      > cities in the border states of Sonora, Nuevo Leon and
      > Tamaulipas.
      >
      >
      > Additional sources: Norte/El Universal, February 3, 2010.
      > El Sur/Agencia
      > Reforma, February 3, 2010. Articles by  Claudia
      > Salazar, Armando Esterop,
      > Mayolo Lopez, Adriana Garcia, and Miguel Angel Granados
      > Chapa.
      > Proceso/Apro, February 2, 2010. Article by Jesusa
      > Cervantes.  La
      > Jornada/Notimex,  February 2, 2010. El Siglo de
      > Torreon, February 2, 2010.
      > Televisa, February 1, 2010. Arrobajuarez.com, January 31,
      > 2010. Diario de
      > Juarez, January 31, 2010. Lapolaka.com, January 31, 2010.
      >
      >
      > Frontera NorteSur (FNS): on-line, U.S.-Mexico border news
      > Center for Latin American and Border Studies
      > New Mexico State University
      > Las Cruces, New Mexico
      >
      > For a free electronic subscription email: fnsnews@...
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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