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my choice for president

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  • tonymaloley
    As a registered Republican, I voted for Bush in 2000. I largely subscribed to the economic policies of Republicans at that time, mainly that lower taxes would
    Message 1 of 4 , Oct 24, 2004
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      As a registered Republican, I voted for Bush in 2000. I largely
      subscribed to the economic policies of Republicans at that time,
      mainly that lower taxes would create a stronger economy.

      Then I took some college economics courses, and looked more in-depth
      at the different factors that make up an economy. I realized I had
      never considered the stimulating effect that government spending can
      have on an economy. That when a government spends, the money doesn't
      just evaporate, it goes back into the economy. I also learned how
      the United States has much lower taxes than much of the civilized
      world. In Sweden, for example, people pay nearly 50% of their income
      in taxes. But they receive more services for their money, like
      public college education, which improves their quality of life.

      Up until two weeks ago I was undecided and didn't know whether I'd
      vote for president or not. (To me, not voting is noble if you are
      truly undecided.)

      This election came down to: Do I want Bush to be president, or not?

      On the one hand, voting for Bush could be the thing to do to protect
      America from terrorists, in that anyone who would strike us would
      know that a severe retribution would be coming.

      On the other hand, voting against Bush could prevent him from
      starting any more unnecessary wars. Bush told us that Saddam was
      building nukes, and Bush was wrong. 15,000 dead in Iraq - and
      counting - to me is unacceptable.

      I have for the last 2 to 3 years entertained the notion that Nader
      would make an excellent president, and that the best way is for
      people to vote their conscience, even if it makes the Democrat
      candidate lose. Ideally, this is true, because it could cause the
      Democrats to adjust their platform, to include more of the 3rd
      party's philosophy, and win their votes. That's how politics works.

      But this is not a perfect world, and until we institute a voting
      system that more accurately measures the preference of the public
      (such as instant-runoff voting), voters will feel compelled to choose
      between the "lesser of two evils," or to put it another way, to vote
      for the one who is really their second choice.

      I recently registered in my new county as an independent.

      What made up my mind two weeks ago is a story I saw on the evening
      news about the national debt.

      Under Bush, the national debt has grown roughly 2 trillion dollars,
      to 7 trillion. The gross national product of the United States is
      roughly 11 trillion. The federal budget is roughly 2 trillion. This
      is proportional to a person with a salary of $30,000, who borrowed
      $105,000 to buy a second home. The difference is, the person will
      have to make a regular minimum payment, and might someday repay the
      entire debt. The government, however, can continue borrowing until
      every lender loses confidence in ever getting paid back.

      Bush does not seem to mind the size of the debt. His arbitrary tax
      cuts and eager military campaigns leave me with no reason to believe
      that he will try to reduce the debt, and will likely continue his
      deficit spending at a similar pace. A 9 trillion dollar debt will
      harm our nation more than any damn terrorist can. Bush must go.

      I will gladly vote for John Kerry, and I encourage others to do so as
      well.

      I never thought much of him before, but I hope as president Mr. Kerry
      will change my mind. Any port in a storm.
    • greg
      I also voted for Kerry (early voting) after years of supporting a different party, the Greens. I know that some of my Green friends are ticked off at me for
      Message 2 of 4 , Oct 24, 2004
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        I also voted for Kerry (early voting) after years of supporting a
        different party, the Greens. I know that some of my Green friends are
        ticked off at me for it, are you facing similar problems from
        Republican friends, Tony?

        I also for the first time ever voted for a Republican. In the past
        I've voted for Greens, Democrats, Libertarians, and independents, but
        never a Republican. The one I voted for is a local judge, Richard
        Roman, who several Democrats I know assured me is one of the best
        local judges. And I know from reading the paper that he is fair and
        willing to allow investigation of the massive corruption in my city.
        --- In prezveepsenator@yahoogroups.com, "tonymaloley" <am7788zz@m...>
        wrote:
        >
        > As a registered Republican, I voted for Bush in 2000. I largely
        > subscribed to the economic policies of Republicans at that time,
        > mainly that lower taxes would create a stronger economy.
        >
        > Then I took some college economics courses, and looked more in-depth
        > at the different factors that make up an economy. I realized I had
        > never considered the stimulating effect that government spending can
        > have on an economy. That when a government spends, the money doesn't
        > just evaporate, it goes back into the economy. I also learned how
        > the United States has much lower taxes than much of the civilized
        > world. In Sweden, for example, people pay nearly 50% of their income
        > in taxes. But they receive more services for their money, like
        > public college education, which improves their quality of life.
        >
        > Up until two weeks ago I was undecided and didn't know whether I'd
        > vote for president or not. (To me, not voting is noble if you are
        > truly undecided.)
        >
        > This election came down to: Do I want Bush to be president, or not?
        >
        > On the one hand, voting for Bush could be the thing to do to protect
        > America from terrorists, in that anyone who would strike us would
        > know that a severe retribution would be coming.
        >
        > On the other hand, voting against Bush could prevent him from
        > starting any more unnecessary wars. Bush told us that Saddam was
        > building nukes, and Bush was wrong. 15,000 dead in Iraq - and
        > counting - to me is unacceptable.
        >
        > I have for the last 2 to 3 years entertained the notion that Nader
        > would make an excellent president, and that the best way is for
        > people to vote their conscience, even if it makes the Democrat
        > candidate lose. Ideally, this is true, because it could cause the
        > Democrats to adjust their platform, to include more of the 3rd
        > party's philosophy, and win their votes. That's how politics works.
        >
        > But this is not a perfect world, and until we institute a voting
        > system that more accurately measures the preference of the public
        > (such as instant-runoff voting), voters will feel compelled to choose
        > between the "lesser of two evils," or to put it another way, to vote
        > for the one who is really their second choice.
        >
        > I recently registered in my new county as an independent.
        >
        > What made up my mind two weeks ago is a story I saw on the evening
        > news about the national debt.
        >
        > Under Bush, the national debt has grown roughly 2 trillion dollars,
        > to 7 trillion. The gross national product of the United States is
        > roughly 11 trillion. The federal budget is roughly 2 trillion. This
        > is proportional to a person with a salary of $30,000, who borrowed
        > $105,000 to buy a second home. The difference is, the person will
        > have to make a regular minimum payment, and might someday repay the
        > entire debt. The government, however, can continue borrowing until
        > every lender loses confidence in ever getting paid back.
        >
        > Bush does not seem to mind the size of the debt. His arbitrary tax
        > cuts and eager military campaigns leave me with no reason to believe
        > that he will try to reduce the debt, and will likely continue his
        > deficit spending at a similar pace. A 9 trillion dollar debt will
        > harm our nation more than any damn terrorist can. Bush must go.
        >
        > I will gladly vote for John Kerry, and I encourage others to do so as
        > well.
        >
        > I never thought much of him before, but I hope as president Mr. Kerry
        > will change my mind. Any port in a storm.
      • Ram Lau
        Tony, Thanks for keeping an open mind and thanks for seeing through the real issues that confront us in the most critical moment of our lifetime. You are a
        Message 3 of 4 , Oct 24, 2004
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          Tony,

          Thanks for keeping an open mind and thanks for seeing through the
          real issues that confront us in the most critical moment of our
          lifetime. You are a friend.

          Ram
        • Ram Lau
          ... Actually many Yankee Republicans are quite liberal and likeable. The judge you are talking about is probably one of those moderate-wing Rockefeller
          Message 4 of 4 , Oct 24, 2004
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            > never a Republican. The one I voted for is a local judge, Richard

            Actually many Yankee Republicans are quite liberal and likeable. The
            judge you are talking about is probably one of those moderate-wing
            Rockefeller leftovers.

            By the way, I remember reading something about some moderate
            Republicans in Colorado endorsing Kerry. Let me post that article
            also.

            Ram
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