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Re: Something to be proud of

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  • Ram Lau
    Greg, That s what I wrote to the GT Democrats. Ram & Company registered 538 people in the last couple of months. ;-) Ram ... The ... forget ... the ... stay
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 26, 2004
      Greg,

      That's what I wrote to the GT Democrats. Ram & Company registered
      538 people in the last couple of months. ;-)

      Ram


      --- In prezveepsenator@yahoogroups.com, "greg" <gregcannon1@y...>
      wrote:
      > That's good work they're doing. Are you part of that effort, Ram?
      > --- In prezveepsenator@yahoogroups.com, "Ram Lau" <ramlau@y...>
      wrote:
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: "Ram Lau" <ramlau82@y...>
      > > Newsgroups: git.club.democrats
      > > Sent: Sunday, September 26, 2004 9:01 PM
      > > Subject: I'm very proud of you Democrats
      > >
      > >
      > > > I'm so honored to be a tiny part of this registration effort.
      The
      > > > experience of the Florida trips is priceless to me. I won't
      forget
      > > > Ms. Curry who has been waiting for her leg surgery for years,
      the
      > > > Robinsons who treated us with great soul food, the Bowdens who
      > > > fixed my car for free, the Jacksons who gave us a place to
      stay
      > > > when Frances hit, and so many good people who made it happen.
      > > > They have been so mistreated by the government. But they know
      > > > we care and there is still hope.
      > > >
      > > > Kerry better not let us down, and win one for the little
      people.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > A Big Increase of New Voters in Swing States
      > > >
      > > > September 26, 2004
      > > > By FORD FESSENDEN
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > COLUMBUS, Ohio - A sweeping voter registration campaign in
      > > > heavily Democratic areas has added tens of thousands of new
      > > > voters to the rolls in the swing states of Ohio and
      > > > Florida, a surge that has far exceeded the efforts of
      > > > Republicans in both states, a review of registration data
      > > > shows.
      > > >
      > > > The analysis by The New York Times of county-by-county data
      > > > shows that in Democratic areas of Ohio - primarily
      > > > low-income and minority neighborhoods - new registrations
      > > > since January have risen 250 percent over the same period
      > > > in 2000. In comparison, new registrations have increased
      > > > just 25 percent in Republican areas. A similar pattern is
      > > > apparent in Florida: in the strongest Democratic areas, the
      > > > pace of new registration is 60 percent higher than in 2000,
      > > > while it has risen just 12 percent in the heaviest
      > > > Republican areas.
      > > >
      > > > While comparable data could not be obtained for other swing
      > > > states, similar registration drives have been mounted in
      > > > them as well, and party officials on both sides say record
      > > > numbers of new voters are being registered nationwide. This
      > > > largely hidden but deadly earnest battle is widely believed
      > > > by campaign professionals and political scientists to be
      > > > potentially decisive in the presidential election.
      > > >
      > > > "We know it's going on, and it's a very encouraging sign,"
      > > > said Steve Elmendorf, deputy campaign manager for Senator
      > > > John Kerry, the Democratic presidential nominee. The new
      > > > voters, Mr. Elmendorf said, "could very much be the
      > > > difference."
      > > >
      > > > A spokeswoman for the Republican National Committee,
      > > > Christine Iverson, declined to comment on The Times's
      > > > findings and said she did not believe Republicans were
      > > > lagging in the registration battle. "We're very confident
      > > > that we have a ground game that's as good as the
      > > > Democrats', and better," she said.
      > > >
      > > > The precise impact of the swell in registration is
      > > > difficult to predict, as there is no reliable gauge of how
      > > > many of these new voters will actually vote. Some experts,
      > > > though, say that the spike has not been accurately captured
      > > > by political polls and could confound prognostications in
      > > > closely contested states.
      > > >
      > > > What is clear is that each side has deployed huge numbers
      > > > of workers and devoted millions of dollars to the effort.
      > > > Much of it is being directed by civil rights and community
      > > > groups, as well as soft-money organizations allied with the
      > > > Democrats. One such Democratic umbrella group, America
      > > > Votes, says its constituents - labor unions, trial lawyers,
      > > > environmental groups, community organizations - will spend
      > > > $300 million on registration and turnout in swing states, a
      > > > sum that dwarfs the $150 million in public financing the
      > > > two candidates together will receive for the entire fall
      > > > campaign.
      > > >
      > > > The registration drives are just the first step in a
      > > > campaign by each side to get more Americans to vote by
      > > > using personal contact. As registration winds down, with
      > > > early October cutoffs in many states, efforts will shift to
      > > > staying in touch through Election Day with repeated phone
      > > > calls and visits, and, on Nov. 2, ferrying people to the
      > > > polls.
      > > >
      > > > In Ohio - no Republican presidential candidate has ever
      > > > been elected without carrying the state - the campaign has
      > > > been especially exhaustive. Canvassers ride public
      > > > transportation, visit coin laundries, and trudge the
      > > > sidewalks and parking lots at the job centers, housing
      > > > agencies and community colleges.
      > > >
      > > > In Columbus, Akume Green has haunted the Franklin County
      > > > Courthouse for months, working the sidewalk between the
      > > > entrance and the nearby bus stop. Ms. Green says she has
      > > > signed up more than 700 voters since March here and
      > > > elsewhere in the city. But it is getting harder to do so,
      > > > she said. On a recent day, the first 12 people she asked
      > > > said they had already registered.
      > > >
      > > > "I get about 30 new voters or changes of address in six
      > > > hours," said Ms. Green, who was hired by Project Vote, the
      > > > nonpartisan arm of the Association of Community
      > > > Organizations for Reform Now, or Acorn. "I used to get 16
      > > > in 45 minutes, but now everyone's registered."
      > > >
      > > > Studies have shown that calling voters and showing up at
      > > > their houses before and on Election Day substantially
      > > > increases turnout - and is cheaper per vote than buying a
      > > > television advertisement. Republicans used the strategy
      > > > with great success in the 2002 elections.
      > > >
      > > > But Donald P. Green, a professor of political science at
      > > > Yale who has conducted many of those studies, said there
      > > > was no reliable way to tell how many new voters would turn
      > > > out at the polls, especially those from lower-income areas.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > "Do you get 30 percent, or do you get 70 percent?"
      > > > Professor Green said. "To the extent that these new voters
      > > > are on the radar screen of groups that have the kind of
      > > > resources these groups have at their disposal, they might
      > > > well turn out."
      > > >
      > > > Steve Rosenthal, the chief executive of Americans Coming
      > > > Together, or ACT, a soft-money group that is trying to
      > > > register Democrats, said he believed they would. "I think
      > > > what's happening on the streets, below the radar, is what's
      > > > going to make the big difference on Election Day," said Mr.
      > > > Rosenthal, who said his organization and the other groups
      > > > would register two and a half million new Democratic voters
      > > > nationwide.
      > > >
      > > > But Republican officials say they remain confident that
      > > > their voters will prove easier to get to the polls. "It
      > > > would scare me if we weren't doing our own thing," said
      > > > Joanne Davidson, the regional chairwoman of the Bush
      > > > campaign in four Midwestern states including Ohio, of the
      > > > wave of new Democrats. "We know how to turn out voters."
      > > >
      > > > Ms. Green is typical of the army of registrars who have
      > > > been working the streets here, some of them since last
      > > > September. Their persistence has produced results. Franklin
      > > > County had 650,000 registered voters in the 2000 election.
      > > > "Now we're over 800,000," said Matt Damschroder, the
      > > > director of the Board of Elections. "If you look at the
      > > > pure census numbers, you'd think we are close to
      > > > registering the entire voting-age population."
      > > >
      > > > Project Vote says it has registered 147,000 new voters in
      > > > Ohio. Americans Coming Together said that, together with
      > > > allied groups that are part of America Votes, it had
      > > > registered 300,000 new voters. America Votes and ACT are
      > > > openly Democratic, although they cannot legally coordinate
      > > > with the party or the Kerry campaign.
      > > >
      > > > Republican officials say they think the paid workers who
      > > > are registering low-income voters are sloppy, and are
      > > > skeptical of the number of voters they claim to have
      > > > registered, saying many are duplicates and changes of
      > > > address. Mr. Damschroder said he had to throw out many of
      > > > the cards he got because the voters were already
      > > > registered. "One woman had signed a card three different
      > > > times," with three different groups, he said.
      > > >
      > > > Prosecutors in Columbus have filed criminal charges against
      > > > an Acorn registrar, saying that he filed a false
      > > > registration form and forged a signature. Officials for the
      > > > group say they fired the worker and instituted a quality
      > > > checking system before the prosecutors acted.
      > > >
      > > > Nevertheless, an examination of county registration records
      > > > shows that the groups have added thousands of new Democrats
      > > > to the rolls and have far outnumbered new registrations in
      > > > Republican areas. In a 300-square-block area east of the
      > > > courthouse in downtown Columbus that voted nine to one
      > > > against Mr. Bush in 2000, for instance, 3,000 new voters
      > > > have registered this year. That is three times as many as
      > > > in each of the last two presidential election years. The
      > > > number of registered voters in the area is up 18 percent
      > > > since January.
      > > >
      > > > By comparison, in a prosperous area north of downtown with
      > > > a similar number of voters who are overwhelmingly
      > > > Republican, just 1,100 new voters have been added this
      > > > year, increasing registration rolls by 7 percent.
      > > >
      > > > These numbers are similar across Ohio. The Times examined
      > > > registration from Jan. 1 to July 31 in a sample of counties
      > > > that included seven of the state's nine largest, along with
      > > > some smaller rural and suburban counties. Voters do not
      > > > give a party affiliation when they register in Ohio, but
      > > > The Times looked at the voting history of ZIP codes to
      > > > gauge the political inclinations of the new voters.
      > > >
      > > > In rock-ribbed Republican areas - 103 ZIP codes, many of
      > > > them rural and suburban areas, that voted by two to one or
      > > > better for George W. Bush in 2000 - 35,000 new voters have
      > > > registered, a substantial increase over the 28,000 that
      > > > registered in those areas in the first seven months of
      > > > 2000. The Ohio Republican party said it was pleased with
      > > > the results.
      > > >
      > > > "It's not easy work, but we go door to door in strong
      > > > Republican precincts, making sure everyone is registered,"
      > > > said Chris McNulty, the state party chairman.
      > > >
      > > > But in heavily Democratic areas - 60 ZIP codes mostly in
      > > > the core of big cities like Cleveland, Dayton, Columbus and
      > > > Youngstown that voted two to one or better against Mr. Bush
      > > > - new registrations have more than tripled over 2000, to
      > > > 63,000 from 17,000.
      > > >
      > > > In Florida, where The Times was able to analyze data from
      > > > 60 of the state's 67 counties, new registrations this year
      > > > also are running far ahead of the 2000 pace, with
      > > > Republican areas trailing Democratic ones. In the 150 ZIP
      > > > codes that voted most heavily for Mr. Bush, 96,000 new
      > > > voters have registered this year, up from 86,000 in 2000,
      > > > an increase of about 12 percent.
      > > >
      > > > But in the heaviest of Democratic areas, 110 ZIP codes that
      > > > gave two-thirds or more of their votes to Al Gore, new
      > > > registrations have increased to 125, 000 from 77,000, a
      > > > jump of more than 60 percent.
      > > >
      > > > In Duval County, where a confusing ballot design in 2000
      > > > helped disqualify thousands of ballots in black precincts,
      > > > new registrations by black voters are up 150 percent over
      > > > the pace of 2000.
      > > >
      > > > "We're using guerrilla tactics to get into the malls and
      > > > sign up voters before the security guards chase us off,"
      > > > said Adam Broad, 40, an organizer in Duval County with the
      > > > Florida Consumer Action Network Foundation, one of dozens
      > > > of community groups registering in Florida.
      > > >
      > > > The groups are building nationwide databases of voters and
      > > > have committed millions of dollars for continued contact
      > > > with them before and on Election Day.
      > > >
      > > > "If every Democrat showed up at the polls, you'd win, no
      > > > question," said James Koehler, a precinct organizer in
      > > > Columbus working for MoveOn.org, another soft-money group.
      > > > Mr. Koehler said MoveOn hoped to have a volunteer in every
      > > > precinct to call neighbors on Nov. 2.
      > > >
      > > > But intensive voter contact and turnout are exactly what
      > > > the Republicans believe they do best. Their plan calls for
      > > > the same kind of sophisticated targeting, and a last-minute
      > > > push for turnout called a 72-hour strategy, the plan
      > > > Republicans used in 2002 to overwhelm incumbent Democrats
      > > > like former Senator Max Cleland in Georgia.
      > > >
      > > > Even before Election Day, the new voters may be having an
      > > > impact on the campaign, because they may not be accurately
      > > > reflected in the political polls.
      > > >
      > > > "The people who are new voters are disengaged; they're less
      > > > likely to respond to a poll question," said Philip
      > > > Klinkner, a government professor at Hamilton College.
      > > >
      > > >
      http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/26/politics/campaign/26vote.html?
      > > ex=109721427
      > > > 9&ei=1&en=1410fbce5b5761f0
      > > >
      > > >
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