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Conservationists mourn Crocodile Hunter

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  • Greg Cannon
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060904/ap_en_tv/crocodile_hunter_reaction_1 Conservationists mourn Crocodile Hunter Mon Sep 4, 9:48 AM ET LONDON -
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 4, 2006
      http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060904/ap_en_tv/crocodile_hunter_reaction_1

      Conservationists mourn Crocodile Hunter

      Mon Sep 4, 9:48 AM ET

      LONDON - Conservationists mourned the death of
      Australia's flamboyant "Crocodile Hunter" Steve Irwin
      on Monday, and one suggested that TV's demands for
      sensation had pushed him to be too daring.

      "He clearly took a lot of risks and television
      encouraged him to do that," said Ray Mears, a Briton
      whose television programs have included "Extreme
      Survival."

      "It's a shame that television audiences need that to
      be attracted to wildlife," Mears said. "Dangerous
      animals, you leave them alone because they will defend
      themselves. Nature defends itself, it isn't all about
      hugging animals and going 'ahh.'"

      The ebullient Irwin, 44, died after being stung by a
      stingray barb in a diving accident about 2,000
      kilometers (1,200 miles) north off Port Douglas on the
      Great Barrier Reef.

      "What he did was so extreme that it isn't surprising
      that he died. Just the same, it is very sad," said
      Kees Oscar Ekeli, a marine biologist and director of
      the Bergen Aquarium in Norway.

      Although Irwin "went further than was sensible," Ekeli
      credited the Australian "did a fantastic job of
      spreading information about biology ... and nature's
      dangerous species."

      "In the modern world's noisy media picture, he used
      extreme methods to break through, and that is exactly
      what he did," Ekeli added.

      British naturalist David Bellamy said he cried when
      heard of Irwin's death.

      "The thing with Steve was he mixed damn good science
      with show business and I don't know anyone else who
      did that," Bellamy said.

      British zoologist Mark O'Shea, who has also worked on
      television, said Irwin had made a massive contribution
      to conservation in Australia.

      "It is going to leave an immense hole," said O'Shea,
      who credited Irwin with inspiring a new generation of
      conservationists.

      "A lot of people who now want to study biology and
      work with animals may not have considered it before
      they watched him on television," O'Shea said.
    • THOMAS JOHNSON
      Did anyone catch Lou Dobbs(CNN) tonight? One of the first segments covered election fraud and the easy manipulation of electronic voting, and I take some
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 4, 2006
        Did anyone catch Lou Dobbs(CNN) tonight? One of the
        first segments covered election fraud and the easy
        manipulation of electronic voting, and I take some
        comfort that another mainstream media outlet, besides
        MSNBC's Countdown, is reporting on the election fraud
        in Ohio in 2004. It's 22 months late but I'm grateful
        for any coverage at this point. In my opinion, the
        last 6 years have been the worst assault on the
        stability of our democracy since both of the Sedition
        Acts of 1798 and 1918. Does anybody have an opinion on
        that assertion?

        Tom

        --- Greg Cannon <gregcannon1@...> wrote:

        >
        http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060904/ap_en_tv/crocodile_hunter_reaction_1
        >
        > Conservationists mourn Crocodile Hunter
        >
        > Mon Sep 4, 9:48 AM ET
        >
        > LONDON - Conservationists mourned the death of
        > Australia's flamboyant "Crocodile Hunter" Steve
        > Irwin
        > on Monday, and one suggested that TV's demands for
        > sensation had pushed him to be too daring.
        >
        > "He clearly took a lot of risks and television
        > encouraged him to do that," said Ray Mears, a Briton
        > whose television programs have included "Extreme
        > Survival."
        >
        > "It's a shame that television audiences need that to
        > be attracted to wildlife," Mears said. "Dangerous
        > animals, you leave them alone because they will
        > defend
        > themselves. Nature defends itself, it isn't all
        > about
        > hugging animals and going 'ahh.'"
        >
        > The ebullient Irwin, 44, died after being stung by a
        > stingray barb in a diving accident about 2,000
        > kilometers (1,200 miles) north off Port Douglas on
        > the
        > Great Barrier Reef.
        >
        > "What he did was so extreme that it isn't surprising
        > that he died. Just the same, it is very sad," said
        > Kees Oscar Ekeli, a marine biologist and director of
        > the Bergen Aquarium in Norway.
        >
        > Although Irwin "went further than was sensible,"
        > Ekeli
        > credited the Australian "did a fantastic job of
        > spreading information about biology ... and nature's
        > dangerous species."
        >
        > "In the modern world's noisy media picture, he used
        > extreme methods to break through, and that is
        > exactly
        > what he did," Ekeli added.
        >
        > British naturalist David Bellamy said he cried when
        > heard of Irwin's death.
        >
        > "The thing with Steve was he mixed damn good science
        > with show business and I don't know anyone else who
        > did that," Bellamy said.
        >
        > British zoologist Mark O'Shea, who has also worked
        > on
        > television, said Irwin had made a massive
        > contribution
        > to conservation in Australia.
        >
        > "It is going to leave an immense hole," said O'Shea,
        > who credited Irwin with inspiring a new generation
        > of
        > conservationists.
        >
        > "A lot of people who now want to study biology and
        > work with animals may not have considered it before
        > they watched him on television," O'Shea said.
        >
      • Ram Lau
        As far as bad civil rights legislations go, the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, and the Japanese Internment of 1942 were all
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 5, 2006
          As far as bad civil rights legislations go, the Fugitive Slave Act of
          1850, the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, and the Japanese Internment
          of 1942 were all pretty bad. But they are textbook cases, I'd like to
          know about the lesser known ones.

          Ram


          --- In prezveepsenator@yahoogroups.com, THOMAS JOHNSON <AVRCRDNG@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Did anyone catch Lou Dobbs(CNN) tonight? One of the
          > first segments covered election fraud and the easy
          > manipulation of electronic voting, and I take some
          > comfort that another mainstream media outlet, besides
          > MSNBC's Countdown, is reporting on the election fraud
          > in Ohio in 2004. It's 22 months late but I'm grateful
          > for any coverage at this point. In my opinion, the
          > last 6 years have been the worst assault on the
          > stability of our democracy since both of the Sedition
          > Acts of 1798 and 1918. Does anybody have an opinion on
          > that assertion?
          >
          > Tom
          >
          > --- Greg Cannon <gregcannon1@...> wrote:
          >
          > >
          > http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060904/ap_en_tv/crocodile_hunter_reaction_1
          > >
          > > Conservationists mourn Crocodile Hunter
          > >
          > > Mon Sep 4, 9:48 AM ET
          > >
          > > LONDON - Conservationists mourned the death of
          > > Australia's flamboyant "Crocodile Hunter" Steve
          > > Irwin
          > > on Monday, and one suggested that TV's demands for
          > > sensation had pushed him to be too daring.
          > >
          > > "He clearly took a lot of risks and television
          > > encouraged him to do that," said Ray Mears, a Briton
          > > whose television programs have included "Extreme
          > > Survival."
          > >
          > > "It's a shame that television audiences need that to
          > > be attracted to wildlife," Mears said. "Dangerous
          > > animals, you leave them alone because they will
          > > defend
          > > themselves. Nature defends itself, it isn't all
          > > about
          > > hugging animals and going 'ahh.'"
          > >
          > > The ebullient Irwin, 44, died after being stung by a
          > > stingray barb in a diving accident about 2,000
          > > kilometers (1,200 miles) north off Port Douglas on
          > > the
          > > Great Barrier Reef.
          > >
          > > "What he did was so extreme that it isn't surprising
          > > that he died. Just the same, it is very sad," said
          > > Kees Oscar Ekeli, a marine biologist and director of
          > > the Bergen Aquarium in Norway.
          > >
          > > Although Irwin "went further than was sensible,"
          > > Ekeli
          > > credited the Australian "did a fantastic job of
          > > spreading information about biology ... and nature's
          > > dangerous species."
          > >
          > > "In the modern world's noisy media picture, he used
          > > extreme methods to break through, and that is
          > > exactly
          > > what he did," Ekeli added.
          > >
          > > British naturalist David Bellamy said he cried when
          > > heard of Irwin's death.
          > >
          > > "The thing with Steve was he mixed damn good science
          > > with show business and I don't know anyone else who
          > > did that," Bellamy said.
          > >
          > > British zoologist Mark O'Shea, who has also worked
          > > on
          > > television, said Irwin had made a massive
          > > contribution
          > > to conservation in Australia.
          > >
          > > "It is going to leave an immense hole," said O'Shea,
          > > who credited Irwin with inspiring a new generation
          > > of
          > > conservationists.
          > >
          > > "A lot of people who now want to study biology and
          > > work with animals may not have considered it before
          > > they watched him on television," O'Shea said.
          > >
          >
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