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Governors bristle at Bush Guard proposal

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  • Greg Cannon
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060805/ap_on_re_us/governors_guard;_ylt=AnxvEmCnLxKeAZXgptFynKSs0NUE;_ylu=X3oDMTA3b2NibDltBHNlYwM3MTY- Governors bristle at Bush
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 5, 2006
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      http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060805/ap_on_re_us/governors_guard;_ylt=AnxvEmCnLxKeAZXgptFynKSs0NUE;_ylu=X3oDMTA3b2NibDltBHNlYwM3MTY-

      Governors bristle at Bush Guard proposal

      By ROBERT TANNER, AP National Writer 19 minutes ago

      CHARLESTON, S.C. - The nation's governors are closing
      ranks in opposition to a proposal in Congress that
      would let the president take control of the National
      Guard in emergencies without consent of governors.

      The idea, spurred by the destruction and chaos that
      followed Hurricane Katrina's landfall in Louisiana and
      Mississippi, is part of a House-passed version of the
      National Defense Authorization Act. It has not yet
      been agreed to by the Senate.

      The measure would remove the currently required
      consent of governors for the federalization of the
      Guard, which is shared between the individual states
      and the federal government.

      "Federalization just for the sake of federalization
      makes no sense," said Gov. Kathleen Blanco of
      Louisiana, a Democrat who had rough relations with the
      Bush administration after the disaster last year. "You
      don't need federalization to get federal troops. ...
      Just making quick decisions can make things happen."

      Gov. Mark Sanford of South Carolina, a Republican,
      said "a whole bunch of governors" were opposed to the
      idea after the proposed change was brought up in a
      private lunch meeting.

      Some two dozen governors met in Charleston for three
      days of discussions at the annual summer gathering of
      the National Governors Association. The association's
      leaders sent a formal letter of opposition to House
      leaders last week.

      The language in the House measure would let the
      president take control in case of "a serious natural
      or manmade disaster, accident, or catastrophe,"
      according to the NGA.

      "The idea of federalizing yet another function of
      government in America is a, the wrong direction, and
      b, counterproductive," Sanford said. "The system has
      worked quite well, notwithstanding what went wrong
      with Katrina."
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