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Re: Vt. City Electing Mayor Via Instant Runoff

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  • greg
    The Nader-Gore situation reminds me of something I read the order day that you all might be interested in. This is from Robert S. McElvaine s The Great
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 5, 2006
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      The Nader-Gore situation reminds me of something I read the order day
      that you all might be interested in. This is from Robert S.
      McElvaine's The Great Depression (246-247):

      In the summer of 1935, the Democratic National Committee conducted a
      secret poll on [Huey] Long as a possible third-party presidential
      candidate. The Democrats were shocked to learn that between 3 million
      and 4 million Americans might vote for Long and wealth-sharing. Even
      more disturbing to New Dealers were indications that Long had strong
      support in the midwestern Farm Belt and in the industrial regions
      along the Great Lakes (12.5 percent) and even the Pacific coast (12.1
      percent). The 1935 poll showed that Long could command a minimum
      100,000 votes in New York. It was reported separately that he might
      have obtained 250,000 votes in Ohio. Such a Long candidacy could throw
      the election to the Republicans. This was a fate Franklin Roosevelt
      did not want to see befall his countrymen. The President was already
      engaged in a secret war against Long. The White House offered
      encouragement to the senator's opponents in Louisiana, denied
      patronage to Long's supporters, secured the help of other southern
      senators in attacking Long, and even had the Justice Department and
      the FBI investigate the possibiity of sending troops into Louisiana to
      "restore republican government."

      ...

      By 1935, Long was making it plain that he was likely to support an
      independent presidential candidate the following year. His apparent
      plan was to siphon enough votes from Roosevelt to elect a Republican
      in 1936. Long believed that things would get so bad under a Republican
      administration that the people would turn to him in 1940. The Kingfish
      would be only forty-six when the new decade began, so there would be
      plenty of time.
      There was not. Before Long's last book, My First Days in the White
      House, could reach his public, an assassin's attack ended any
      possibility that fiction might become fact. As Long stood talking to
      aides in a corridor of the Louisiana Capitol in Baton Rouge on the
      night of September 8, 1935, Carl Weiss, a young physician who saw Huey
      as a tyrant and whose father-in-law had been wronged by the Long
      political machine, walked up to the senator and shot him with a
      pistol. Long's bodyguards responded by emptying their guins into Dr.
      Weiss.

      --- In prezveepsenator@yahoogroups.com, "Ram Lau" <ramlau@...> wrote:
      >
      > > > Votes that went to Ralph Nader might ultimately have
      > > > gone to Vice President Al Gore.
      >
      > Gore should just run again in 2008.
      >
      > Ram
      >
    • THOMAS JOHNSON
      Great post, Greg.. I have taken the liberty of passing this along to the American Presidents group, as we are covering FDR this week, giving you proper credit,
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 6, 2006
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        Great post, Greg.. I have taken the liberty of passing
        this along to the American Presidents group, as we are
        covering FDR this week, giving you proper credit, of
        course.

        Tom



        --- greg <gregcannon1@...> wrote:

        > The Nader-Gore situation reminds me of something I
        > read the order day
        > that you all might be interested in. This is from
        > Robert S.
        > McElvaine's The Great Depression (246-247):
        >
        > In the summer of 1935, the Democratic National
        > Committee conducted a
        > secret poll on [Huey] Long as a possible third-party
        > presidential
        > candidate. The Democrats were shocked to learn that
        > between 3 million
        > and 4 million Americans might vote for Long and
        > wealth-sharing. Even
        > more disturbing to New Dealers were indications that
        > Long had strong
        > support in the midwestern Farm Belt and in the
        > industrial regions
        > along the Great Lakes (12.5 percent) and even the
        > Pacific coast (12.1
        > percent). The 1935 poll showed that Long could
        > command a minimum
        > 100,000 votes in New York. It was reported
        > separately that he might
        > have obtained 250,000 votes in Ohio. Such a Long
        > candidacy could throw
        > the election to the Republicans. This was a fate
        > Franklin Roosevelt
        > did not want to see befall his countrymen. The
        > President was already
        > engaged in a secret war against Long. The White
        > House offered
        > encouragement to the senator's opponents in
        > Louisiana, denied
        > patronage to Long's supporters, secured the help of
        > other southern
        > senators in attacking Long, and even had the Justice
        > Department and
        > the FBI investigate the possibiity of sending troops
        > into Louisiana to
        > "restore republican government."
        >
        > ...
        >
        > By 1935, Long was making it plain that he was likely
        > to support an
        > independent presidential candidate the following
        > year. His apparent
        > plan was to siphon enough votes from Roosevelt to
        > elect a Republican
        > in 1936. Long believed that things would get so bad
        > under a Republican
        > administration that the people would turn to him in
        > 1940. The Kingfish
        > would be only forty-six when the new decade began,
        > so there would be
        > plenty of time.
        > There was not. Before Long's last book, My First
        > Days in the White
        > House, could reach his public, an assassin's attack
        > ended any
        > possibility that fiction might become fact. As Long
        > stood talking to
        > aides in a corridor of the Louisiana Capitol in
        > Baton Rouge on the
        > night of September 8, 1935, Carl Weiss, a young
        > physician who saw Huey
        > as a tyrant and whose father-in-law had been wronged
        > by the Long
        > political machine, walked up to the senator and shot
        > him with a
        > pistol. Long's bodyguards responded by emptying
        > their guins into Dr.
        > Weiss.
        >
        > --- In prezveepsenator@yahoogroups.com, "Ram Lau"
        > <ramlau@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > > > Votes that went to Ralph Nader might
        > ultimately have
        > > > > gone to Vice President Al Gore.
        > >
        > > Gore should just run again in 2008.
        > >
        > > Ram
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        > prezveepsenator-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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