Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

White House threatens the press

Expand Messages
  • THOMAS JOHNSON
    Just when I thought that this administration couldn t get any more reactionary..... White House Trains Efforts on Media Leaks Sources, Reporters Could Be
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 5, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Just when I thought that this administration couldn't
      get any more reactionary.....


      White House Trains Efforts on Media Leaks
      Sources, Reporters Could Be Prosecuted

      By Dan Eggen
      Washington Post Staff Writer
      Sunday, March 5, 2006; Page A01

      The Bush administration, seeking to limit leaks of
      classified information, has launched initiatives
      targeting journalists and their possible government
      sources. The efforts include several FBI probes, a
      polygraph investigation inside the CIA and a warning
      from the Justice Department that reporters could be
      prosecuted under espionage laws.

      In recent weeks, dozens of employees at the CIA, the
      National Security Agency and other intelligence
      agencies have been interviewed by agents from the
      FBI's Washington field office, who are investigating
      possible leaks that led to reports about secret CIA
      prisons and the NSA's warrantless domestic
      surveillance program, according to law enforcement and
      intelligence officials familiar with the two cases.


      Numerous employees at the CIA, FBI, Justice Department
      and other agencies also have received letters from
      Justice prohibiting them from discussing even
      unclassified issues related to the NSA program,
      according to sources familiar with the notices. Some
      GOP lawmakers are also considering whether to approve
      tougher penalties for leaking.

      In a little-noticed case in California, FBI agents
      from Los Angeles have already contacted reporters at
      the Sacramento Bee about stories published in July
      that were based on sealed court documents related to a
      terrorism case in Lodi, according to the newspaper.

      Some media watchers, lawyers and editors say that,
      taken together, the incidents represent perhaps the
      most extensive and overt campaign against leaks in a
      generation, and that they have worsened the
      already-tense relationship between mainstream news
      organizations and the White House.

      "There's a tone of gleeful relish in the way they talk
      about dragging reporters before grand juries, their
      appetite for withholding information, and the hints
      that reporters who look too hard into the public's
      business risk being branded traitors," said New York
      Times Executive Editor Bill Keller, in a statement
      responding to questions from The Washington Post. "I
      don't know how far action will follow rhetoric, but
      some days it sounds like the administration is
      declaring war at home on the values it professes to be
      promoting abroad."

      President Bush has called the NSA leak "a shameful
      act" that was "helping the enemy," and said in
      December that he was hopeful the Justice Department
      would conduct a full investigation into the
      disclosure.

      "We need to protect the right to free speech and the
      First Amendment, and the president is doing that,"
      said White House spokesman Trent Duffy. "But, at the
      same time, we do need to protect classified
      information which helps fight the war on terror."

      Disclosing classified information without
      authorization has long been against the law, yet such
      leaks are one of the realities of life in Washington
      -- accounting for much of the back-channel
      conversation that goes on daily among journalists,
      policy intellectuals, and current and former
      government officials.

      Presidents have also long complained about leaks:
      Richard Nixon's infamous "plumbers" were originally
      set up to plug them, and he tried, but failed, to
      prevent publication of a classified history of the
      Vietnam War called the Pentagon Papers. Ronald Reagan
      exclaimed at one point that he was "up to my keister"
      in leaks.

      Bush administration officials -- who complain that
      reports about detainee abuse, clandestine surveillance
      and other topics have endangered the nation during a
      time of war -- have arguably taken a more aggressive
      approach than other recent administrations, including
      a clear willingness to take on journalists more
      directly if necessary.

      "Almost every administration has kind of come in
      saying they want an open administration, and then
      getting bad press and fuming about leaks," said David
      Greenberg, a Rutgers University journalism professor
      and author of "Nixon's Shadow." "But it's a pretty
      fair statement to say you haven't seen this kind of
      crackdown on leaks since the Nixon administration."


      Tom






      --- Ram Lau <ramlau@...> wrote:

      > > > Votes that went to Ralph Nader might ultimately
      > have
      > > > gone to Vice President Al Gore.
      >
      > Gore should just run again in 2008.
      >
      > Ram
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      > prezveepsenator-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • greg
      The Nader-Gore situation reminds me of something I read the order day that you all might be interested in. This is from Robert S. McElvaine s The Great
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 5, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        The Nader-Gore situation reminds me of something I read the order day
        that you all might be interested in. This is from Robert S.
        McElvaine's The Great Depression (246-247):

        In the summer of 1935, the Democratic National Committee conducted a
        secret poll on [Huey] Long as a possible third-party presidential
        candidate. The Democrats were shocked to learn that between 3 million
        and 4 million Americans might vote for Long and wealth-sharing. Even
        more disturbing to New Dealers were indications that Long had strong
        support in the midwestern Farm Belt and in the industrial regions
        along the Great Lakes (12.5 percent) and even the Pacific coast (12.1
        percent). The 1935 poll showed that Long could command a minimum
        100,000 votes in New York. It was reported separately that he might
        have obtained 250,000 votes in Ohio. Such a Long candidacy could throw
        the election to the Republicans. This was a fate Franklin Roosevelt
        did not want to see befall his countrymen. The President was already
        engaged in a secret war against Long. The White House offered
        encouragement to the senator's opponents in Louisiana, denied
        patronage to Long's supporters, secured the help of other southern
        senators in attacking Long, and even had the Justice Department and
        the FBI investigate the possibiity of sending troops into Louisiana to
        "restore republican government."

        ...

        By 1935, Long was making it plain that he was likely to support an
        independent presidential candidate the following year. His apparent
        plan was to siphon enough votes from Roosevelt to elect a Republican
        in 1936. Long believed that things would get so bad under a Republican
        administration that the people would turn to him in 1940. The Kingfish
        would be only forty-six when the new decade began, so there would be
        plenty of time.
        There was not. Before Long's last book, My First Days in the White
        House, could reach his public, an assassin's attack ended any
        possibility that fiction might become fact. As Long stood talking to
        aides in a corridor of the Louisiana Capitol in Baton Rouge on the
        night of September 8, 1935, Carl Weiss, a young physician who saw Huey
        as a tyrant and whose father-in-law had been wronged by the Long
        political machine, walked up to the senator and shot him with a
        pistol. Long's bodyguards responded by emptying their guins into Dr.
        Weiss.

        --- In prezveepsenator@yahoogroups.com, "Ram Lau" <ramlau@...> wrote:
        >
        > > > Votes that went to Ralph Nader might ultimately have
        > > > gone to Vice President Al Gore.
        >
        > Gore should just run again in 2008.
        >
        > Ram
        >
      • THOMAS JOHNSON
        Great post, Greg.. I have taken the liberty of passing this along to the American Presidents group, as we are covering FDR this week, giving you proper credit,
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 6, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Great post, Greg.. I have taken the liberty of passing
          this along to the American Presidents group, as we are
          covering FDR this week, giving you proper credit, of
          course.

          Tom



          --- greg <gregcannon1@...> wrote:

          > The Nader-Gore situation reminds me of something I
          > read the order day
          > that you all might be interested in. This is from
          > Robert S.
          > McElvaine's The Great Depression (246-247):
          >
          > In the summer of 1935, the Democratic National
          > Committee conducted a
          > secret poll on [Huey] Long as a possible third-party
          > presidential
          > candidate. The Democrats were shocked to learn that
          > between 3 million
          > and 4 million Americans might vote for Long and
          > wealth-sharing. Even
          > more disturbing to New Dealers were indications that
          > Long had strong
          > support in the midwestern Farm Belt and in the
          > industrial regions
          > along the Great Lakes (12.5 percent) and even the
          > Pacific coast (12.1
          > percent). The 1935 poll showed that Long could
          > command a minimum
          > 100,000 votes in New York. It was reported
          > separately that he might
          > have obtained 250,000 votes in Ohio. Such a Long
          > candidacy could throw
          > the election to the Republicans. This was a fate
          > Franklin Roosevelt
          > did not want to see befall his countrymen. The
          > President was already
          > engaged in a secret war against Long. The White
          > House offered
          > encouragement to the senator's opponents in
          > Louisiana, denied
          > patronage to Long's supporters, secured the help of
          > other southern
          > senators in attacking Long, and even had the Justice
          > Department and
          > the FBI investigate the possibiity of sending troops
          > into Louisiana to
          > "restore republican government."
          >
          > ...
          >
          > By 1935, Long was making it plain that he was likely
          > to support an
          > independent presidential candidate the following
          > year. His apparent
          > plan was to siphon enough votes from Roosevelt to
          > elect a Republican
          > in 1936. Long believed that things would get so bad
          > under a Republican
          > administration that the people would turn to him in
          > 1940. The Kingfish
          > would be only forty-six when the new decade began,
          > so there would be
          > plenty of time.
          > There was not. Before Long's last book, My First
          > Days in the White
          > House, could reach his public, an assassin's attack
          > ended any
          > possibility that fiction might become fact. As Long
          > stood talking to
          > aides in a corridor of the Louisiana Capitol in
          > Baton Rouge on the
          > night of September 8, 1935, Carl Weiss, a young
          > physician who saw Huey
          > as a tyrant and whose father-in-law had been wronged
          > by the Long
          > political machine, walked up to the senator and shot
          > him with a
          > pistol. Long's bodyguards responded by emptying
          > their guins into Dr.
          > Weiss.
          >
          > --- In prezveepsenator@yahoogroups.com, "Ram Lau"
          > <ramlau@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > > > Votes that went to Ralph Nader might
          > ultimately have
          > > > > gone to Vice President Al Gore.
          > >
          > > Gore should just run again in 2008.
          > >
          > > Ram
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          > prezveepsenator-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.