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  • THOMAS JOHNSON
    He s done..I m starting to believe in karma again HOUSTON - Barely one of every five of former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay s constituents would vote for
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 15, 2006
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      He's done..I'm starting to believe in karma again

      HOUSTON - Barely one of every five of former House
      Majority Leader
      Tom DeLay's constituents would vote for him if the
      election were held now, according to a newspaper poll
      released Saturday.



      The Republican congressman, who lost his leadership
      post because of felony money laundering charges
      against him, trailed Democratic rival and former
      congressman Nick Lampson in his southeastern Texas
      district, according to the poll of 560 registered
      voters conducted for the Houston Chronicle.

      In polling conducted Tuesday through Thursday, 22
      percent of respondents said they would vote for DeLay,
      30 percent chose Lampson and 11 percent favored
      Republican-turned-independent former congressman Steve
      Stockman.

      Lampson's campaign manager, Mike Malaise, said the
      poll suggests that "people in the district want a
      congressman who will make headlines for the right
      reasons."

      DeLay's spokeswoman Shannon Flaherty challenged the
      validity of the poll and said the result is "contrary
      to the strong support we're seeing for Congressman
      DeLay throughout the district."

      In 2004, DeLay defeated relatively unknown Democrat
      Richard Morrison with 55 percent of the vote, his
      lowest victory margin.

      In the latest poll, only half of those who supported
      DeLay in 2004 said they would vote for him again.

      The poll, conducted by Rice University and the
      University of Houston, has a margin of error was plus
      or minus 4 percentage points.

      The poll was conducted days after DeLay announced he
      would not try to regain his House leadership post
      under pressure from Republicans concerned about his
      ties to disgraced lobbyist Jack Abramoff, who pleaded
      guilty this month to felony charges and is cooperating
      with investigators in a bribery probe focusing on
      several members of Congress and their aides.

      In Texas, DeLay is charged with money laundering in
      connection with the transfer of $190,000 in corporate
      contributions through a Texas political action
      committee founded by DeLay to an arm of the National
      Republican Committee, which then contributed the
      similar amounts to GOP legislative candidates in
      Texas.

      Republicans took control of the Texas Legislature
      after the 2002 elections, and pushed through a
      congressional redistricting plan favorable to the GOP
      that DeLay engineered.

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      --- Greg Cannon <gregcannon1@...> wrote:

      > Ram, from your position in Georgia, does this seem
      > true?
      >
      > --- Julie Keller <jakeller@...> wrote:
      >
      > > To: utepprogressives@yahoogroups.com
      > > From: "Julie Keller" <jakeller@...>
      > > Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2006 23:15:36 -0000
      > > Subject: [utepprogressives] Will Georgia be spared
      > > Ralph Reed?
      > >
      > > http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?
      > > pid=10000103&sid=aG6gHO3vwYZQ&refer=us
      > >
      > > Abramoff Scandal Threatens to Derail Reed's
      > > Political Ambitions
      > >
      > > Jan. 11 (Bloomberg) -- The Washington scandal over
      > > lobbyist Jack
      > > Abramoff may claim a casualty outside the nation's
      > > capital: Ralph
      > > Reed, a former presidential-campaign adviser who
      > > once headed one of
      > > the U.S.'s largest Christian activist groups.
      > >
      > > Disclosures that Reed once ran an anti-gambling
      > > campaign that was
      > > secretly financed by casino-owning clients of his
      > > friend Abramoff
      > > have damaged his ability to raise funds for a bid
      > to
      > > become Georgia's
      > > next lieutenant governor, other Republicans say.
      > > That may undercut
      > > his chances of winning an office that he could use
      > > as a steppingstone
      > > to national political ambitions, they say.
      > >
      > > Campaign-finance reports filed this week show that
      > > Reed, 44, lagged
      > > behind opponent Casey Cagle in fundraising for the
      > > July 18 Republican
      > > primary during the past six months, after
      > collecting
      > > more than twice
      > > as much money as his rival before that. Cagle
      > raised
      > > $667,000 from
      > > June 30 to Dec. 31 to Reed's $404,000.
      > >
      > > ``A lot of those big corporate donors are now
      > > hedging their bets,''
      > > said Matt Towery, the 1990 Republican candidate
      > for
      > > lieutenant
      > > governor, who was once a colleague of Reed's on
      > > Capitol Hill. ``Ralph
      > > faces a very difficult and now problematic
      > > candidacy.''
      > >
      > > An Atlanta Journal-Constitution poll last month
      > > showed Cagle and Reed
      > > would perform about equally well against the
      > > Democrats in the
      > > November election. The poll was conducted by Zogby
      > > International
      > > before Abramoff pleaded guilty to fraud and
      > > conspiring to corrupt
      > > public officials.
      > >
      > > For Reed, who once seemed invincible, with broad
      > > support in his party
      > > and wide name recognition, that isn't good news,
      > > said Towery, who now
      > > publishes Insider Advantage, a guide to politics.
      > >
      > > Up the Ranks
      > >
      > > Reed, who is making his first run for public
      > office,
      > > climbed through
      > > the political ranks because of his connections in
      > > Christian and
      > > Republican circles. From 1989 to 1997, he ran the
      > > Christian Coalition
      > > of America, a then-powerful group founded by
      > > evangelist Pat
      > > Robertson. Reed served as a consultant to George
      > W.
      > > Bush's 2000
      > > presidential campaign and oversaw the Southeast
      > > region for his 2004
      > > re-election.
      > >
      > > Reed's fund-raising slowdown in the past six
      > months
      > > coincided with
      > > the drumbeat of news about Abramoff and Reed's
      > > connections to him.
      > > Those ties are gaining more attention in the
      > > aftermath of Abramoff's
      > > Jan. 3 guilty plea and the widening probe into the
      > > potential bribery
      > > of lawmakers.
      > >
      > > ``There are concerns as to whether Ralph will
      > > continue to make
      > > headlines that are harmful to the party,'' said
      > Eric
      > > Johnson, who as
      > > the Georgia Senate's president pro tem is a top
      > > Republican. Johnson
      > > said he's staying neutral in the primary election.
      >
      > >
      > > `Significant Doubts'
      > >
      > > The Cagle campaign is playing off those concerns.
      > > ``The polling data
      > > we've seen as well as fund raising show how people
      > > in Georgia have
      > > significant doubts about whether they can trust
      > > Ralph,'' Cagle
      > > spokesman Brad Alexander said.
      > >
      > > Reed is still ahead of Cagle, 39, in overall
      > > fundraising, having
      > > collected a total of $1.8 million to Cagle's $1.3
      > > million.
      > >
      > > ``We raised more from more donors on our first
      > > report than our
      > > primary opponent has raised in two reports,'' Reed
      > > spokeswoman Lisa
      > > Baron said. ``It is not uncommon for second
      > reports
      > > after such a
      > > strong first report to reflect the obvious, which
      > is
      > > many donors have
      > > already contributed the maximum.''
      > >
      > > Reed declined to comment for this article.
      > >
      > > Tarnished Image
      > >
      > > Reed's image as someone more interested in
      > Christian
      > > causes than his
      > > own financial well-being has been tarnished by a
      > > stream of e-mails
      > > released by a Senate committee that investigated
      > > Abramoff's bilking
      > > of Indian-tribe clients.
      > >
      > > ``I need to start humping in corporate accounts,''
      > > Reed wrote to
      > > Abramoff in 1998. ``I'm counting on you to help me
      > > with some
      > > contacts.''
      > >
      > > In 2001 alone, he received more than $2.5 million
      > > from entities
      > > connected with Abramoff and partner Michael
      > Scanlon,
      > > according to
      > > documents released by the Senate Indian Affairs
      > > Committee.
      > >
      > > Abramoff and Scanlon used the organizations so
      > Reed
      > > wouldn't be paid
      > > directly by their clients, who wanted to block new
      > > gambling
      > > competition. The e-mails show that Reed knew
      > > casino-owning tribes
      > > were the ultimate clients, though he says he
      > wasn't
      > > paid with
      > > gambling proceeds.
      > >
      > > ``Had I known then what I know now, I would not
      > have
      > > undertaken that
      > > work,'' Reed said in the text of a Dec. 9 speech
      > to
      > > a Georgia youth
      > > group. ``On reflection and with the benefit of
      > > hindsight, it is clear
      > > it associated my longstanding opposition to
      > gambling
      > > with those who
      > > did not share it and has caused difficulty for the
      > > faith community
      > > with whom I worked.''
      > >
      > > Connections
      > >
      > > Reed and Abramoff have known each other since the
      > > early 1980s, when
      > > they were leaders of the College Republicans along
      >
      === message truncated ===
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