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Re: [prezveepsenator] Fwd: [utepprogressives] Will Georgia be spared Ralph Reed?

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  • THOMAS JOHNSON
    I ll certainly defer to Ram, but I have hearing about this for months and his association with Abramhoff goes back to the 80s, and did you know that Reed was
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 13 10:19 PM
      I'll certainly defer to Ram, but I have hearing about
      this for months and his association with Abramhoff
      goes back to the 80s, and did you know that Reed was
      kicked off a school newspaper for plagiarism.

      --- Greg Cannon <gregcannon1@...> wrote:

      > Ram, from your position in Georgia, does this seem
      > true?
      >
      > --- Julie Keller <jakeller@...> wrote:
      >
      > > To: utepprogressives@yahoogroups.com
      > > From: "Julie Keller" <jakeller@...>
      > > Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2006 23:15:36 -0000
      > > Subject: [utepprogressives] Will Georgia be spared
      > > Ralph Reed?
      > >
      > > http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?
      > > pid=10000103&sid=aG6gHO3vwYZQ&refer=us
      > >
      > > Abramoff Scandal Threatens to Derail Reed's
      > > Political Ambitions
      > >
      > > Jan. 11 (Bloomberg) -- The Washington scandal over
      > > lobbyist Jack
      > > Abramoff may claim a casualty outside the nation's
      > > capital: Ralph
      > > Reed, a former presidential-campaign adviser who
      > > once headed one of
      > > the U.S.'s largest Christian activist groups.
      > >
      > > Disclosures that Reed once ran an anti-gambling
      > > campaign that was
      > > secretly financed by casino-owning clients of his
      > > friend Abramoff
      > > have damaged his ability to raise funds for a bid
      > to
      > > become Georgia's
      > > next lieutenant governor, other Republicans say.
      > > That may undercut
      > > his chances of winning an office that he could use
      > > as a steppingstone
      > > to national political ambitions, they say.
      > >
      > > Campaign-finance reports filed this week show that
      > > Reed, 44, lagged
      > > behind opponent Casey Cagle in fundraising for the
      > > July 18 Republican
      > > primary during the past six months, after
      > collecting
      > > more than twice
      > > as much money as his rival before that. Cagle
      > raised
      > > $667,000 from
      > > June 30 to Dec. 31 to Reed's $404,000.
      > >
      > > ``A lot of those big corporate donors are now
      > > hedging their bets,''
      > > said Matt Towery, the 1990 Republican candidate
      > for
      > > lieutenant
      > > governor, who was once a colleague of Reed's on
      > > Capitol Hill. ``Ralph
      > > faces a very difficult and now problematic
      > > candidacy.''
      > >
      > > An Atlanta Journal-Constitution poll last month
      > > showed Cagle and Reed
      > > would perform about equally well against the
      > > Democrats in the
      > > November election. The poll was conducted by Zogby
      > > International
      > > before Abramoff pleaded guilty to fraud and
      > > conspiring to corrupt
      > > public officials.
      > >
      > > For Reed, who once seemed invincible, with broad
      > > support in his party
      > > and wide name recognition, that isn't good news,
      > > said Towery, who now
      > > publishes Insider Advantage, a guide to politics.
      > >
      > > Up the Ranks
      > >
      > > Reed, who is making his first run for public
      > office,
      > > climbed through
      > > the political ranks because of his connections in
      > > Christian and
      > > Republican circles. From 1989 to 1997, he ran the
      > > Christian Coalition
      > > of America, a then-powerful group founded by
      > > evangelist Pat
      > > Robertson. Reed served as a consultant to George
      > W.
      > > Bush's 2000
      > > presidential campaign and oversaw the Southeast
      > > region for his 2004
      > > re-election.
      > >
      > > Reed's fund-raising slowdown in the past six
      > months
      > > coincided with
      > > the drumbeat of news about Abramoff and Reed's
      > > connections to him.
      > > Those ties are gaining more attention in the
      > > aftermath of Abramoff's
      > > Jan. 3 guilty plea and the widening probe into the
      > > potential bribery
      > > of lawmakers.
      > >
      > > ``There are concerns as to whether Ralph will
      > > continue to make
      > > headlines that are harmful to the party,'' said
      > Eric
      > > Johnson, who as
      > > the Georgia Senate's president pro tem is a top
      > > Republican. Johnson
      > > said he's staying neutral in the primary election.
      >
      > >
      > > `Significant Doubts'
      > >
      > > The Cagle campaign is playing off those concerns.
      > > ``The polling data
      > > we've seen as well as fund raising show how people
      > > in Georgia have
      > > significant doubts about whether they can trust
      > > Ralph,'' Cagle
      > > spokesman Brad Alexander said.
      > >
      > > Reed is still ahead of Cagle, 39, in overall
      > > fundraising, having
      > > collected a total of $1.8 million to Cagle's $1.3
      > > million.
      > >
      > > ``We raised more from more donors on our first
      > > report than our
      > > primary opponent has raised in two reports,'' Reed
      > > spokeswoman Lisa
      > > Baron said. ``It is not uncommon for second
      > reports
      > > after such a
      > > strong first report to reflect the obvious, which
      > is
      > > many donors have
      > > already contributed the maximum.''
      > >
      > > Reed declined to comment for this article.
      > >
      > > Tarnished Image
      > >
      > > Reed's image as someone more interested in
      > Christian
      > > causes than his
      > > own financial well-being has been tarnished by a
      > > stream of e-mails
      > > released by a Senate committee that investigated
      > > Abramoff's bilking
      > > of Indian-tribe clients.
      > >
      > > ``I need to start humping in corporate accounts,''
      > > Reed wrote to
      > > Abramoff in 1998. ``I'm counting on you to help me
      > > with some
      > > contacts.''
      > >
      > > In 2001 alone, he received more than $2.5 million
      > > from entities
      > > connected with Abramoff and partner Michael
      > Scanlon,
      > > according to
      > > documents released by the Senate Indian Affairs
      > > Committee.
      > >
      > > Abramoff and Scanlon used the organizations so
      > Reed
      > > wouldn't be paid
      > > directly by their clients, who wanted to block new
      > > gambling
      > > competition. The e-mails show that Reed knew
      > > casino-owning tribes
      > > were the ultimate clients, though he says he
      > wasn't
      > > paid with
      > > gambling proceeds.
      > >
      > > ``Had I known then what I know now, I would not
      > have
      > > undertaken that
      > > work,'' Reed said in the text of a Dec. 9 speech
      > to
      > > a Georgia youth
      > > group. ``On reflection and with the benefit of
      > > hindsight, it is clear
      > > it associated my longstanding opposition to
      > gambling
      > > with those who
      > > did not share it and has caused difficulty for the
      > > faith community
      > > with whom I worked.''
      > >
      > > Connections
      > >
      > > Reed and Abramoff have known each other since the
      > > early 1980s, when
      > > they were leaders of the College Republicans along
      >
      === message truncated ===
    • Ram Lau
      As we all know, Ralph Reed is famous for being a partisan hack but really not an office holder. I doubt that he will even get the GOP nomination this year. See
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 14 11:02 AM
        As we all know, Ralph Reed is famous for being a partisan hack but
        really not an office holder. I doubt that he will even get the GOP
        nomination this year. See the recent article below.

        Ram


        http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/stories/0106metpoll.html
        Perdue draws high ratings in poll
        Governor popular as Legislature convenes

        By JAMES SALZER
        The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
        Published on: 01/06/06

        Gov. Sonny Perdue heads into this re-election season and next week's
        legislative session riding some of the highest approval ratings of his
        three-year tenure, according to a new Atlanta Journal-Constitution poll.

        The Zogby International poll of 501 likely voters gave Perdue a nearly
        61 percent job approval rating, and about 70 percent had a favorable
        opinion of the Republican governor. Perdue will stand for re-election
        in November.

        In head-to-head matchups with two Democratic candidates, Perdue holds
        a 53-37 percent lead over Secretary of State Cathy Cox, and a 56-31
        percent advantage over Lt. Gov. Mark Taylor, according to the poll.

        Perdue drew higher approval ratings than Cox, Taylor and President Bush.

        "That doesn't surprise me," said Senate President Pro Tem Eric Johnson
        (R-Savannah). "I've always said that what citizens want is somebody
        they believe has the best interest of Georgia in mind and is governing
        with integrity. They just have to trust you, and I think Sonny has
        always had that trust factor."

        In the closely watched Republican race for lieutenant governor, state
        Sen. Casey Cagle of Gainesville outperformed Republican strategist
        Ralph Reed in matchups against an unnamed Democrat.

        In the survey, 35 percent of voters said they prefer Cagle, while 30
        percent said they would choose the Democrat. When offered a similar
        choice between Reed and a Democrat, 36 percent chose the Democrat, and
        33 percent selected Reed.

        Merle Black, an Emory University political scientist, said the poll
        shows Perdue to be in good shape, though he expects a tighter race as
        November draws closer and millions are spent selling the candidates.

        Democrats, Black said, "Have got a challenge in developing issues that
        put the governor on the defensive and make the argument that Georgia
        would be better off if Democrats controlled government."

        Perdue's margins over Cox and Taylor have improved since a similar
        Zogby poll in April. At the time, Cox and Perdue were running even.

        Since then, Perdue has managed the state through the aftermath of
        Hurricane Katrina and made some bold moves, such as closing schools
        for two days to save diesel fuel and temporarily cutting gas taxes.

        The poll suggests Georgians are in a better mood than in April. Then,
        under half of respondents thought the state was headed in the right
        direction. In the recent poll, that number increased to 60 percent. In
        April, only 48 percent thought Perdue was doing a good or excellent
        job, compared with 61 percent now.

        Rebecca Goss, 29, of Trenton, who interprets for the deaf in her
        northwest Georgia school system, told pollsters Perdue is doing a good
        job.

        "I think he has done a lot to try and help the schools," Goss said.
        "He seems to care about classroom sizes, he called off school to save
        fuel. I know a lot of parents criticized him for it, but he's trying
        to do little things to help the schools."

        Perdue has been criticized by Democrats because he's stalled
        class-size reductions pushed by his predecessor, Roy Barnes.

        Poll respondent Bonnie Abernathy, 49, a business analyst from Atlanta,
        said, "I don't think his record has been very good on education. I
        don't think in general that he's done a good job."

        Perdue is often described as likeable, and that impression could make
        him tough to beat.

        John Zogby, president and CEO of Zogby International, said Perdue's
        ratings can be attributed in part to Georgia becoming a Republican
        state. Also, Zogby said, Georgians see "no scandals, you really can't
        point to any major problem he stepped into, and there is no
        overwhelming reason to change."

        Nick Ayers, who is running Perdue's re-election campaign, downplayed
        the results. Most polls showed Perdue trailing throughout his 2002
        campaign.

        "Polls are meaningless this far out," he said. "Overall, people trust
        him. ... Georgians like having a real guy in office, not a slick
        politician who always does and says exactly what they believe people
        want to hear."

        Morton Brilliant, Cox's campaign manager, said, "Folks think Perdue's
        a nice guy, but they also know he hasn't gotten the job done. Whether
        it's ethics and efficiency or jobs and education, we need a governor
        who will focus on working for all Georgians."

        Rick Dent, Taylor's political consultant, said it's too early to
        worry. "Over the course of the next year, the race — and the polls —
        will change when people find out about Mark Taylor's lifetime
        commitment to making Georgia work for everyone — and it will change
        dramatically," he said.

        In the lieutenant governor's race, Cagle's chief weakness remains his
        obscurity. Asked to express their opinion of him, 68 percent said they
        didn't know him well enough to do so.

        Reed, a former Christian Coalition leader, is better known, but also
        provokes a stronger negative reaction, according to the poll. Among
        Republicans, 10 percent rated Reed unfavorably. Only 4 percent of
        Republicans disliked Cagle.

        "[Reed] epitomizes what's wrong with the Republican party. It's gone
        too far to the right," said poll participant Walter Harris, 92, a
        resident of St. Simons Island. Harris, a former attorney, describes
        himself as a moderate Republican.

        Reed, who has been dogged by his ties with disgraced Washington
        lobbyist Jack Abramoff, ran weakest in metro Atlanta. But his support
        ran strong among older, native Georgians.

        "The Christian right is kind of my thing. If he's for that, then I'm
        for him," said Bonny D. Adams, 69, former mayor of Union City.

        Two Democrats are also in the race: Former state senator Greg Hecht of
        Jonesboro, and former House member Jim Martin of Atlanta.

        Staff writer Jim Galloway contributed to this article.


        --- In prezveepsenator@yahoogroups.com, THOMAS JOHNSON <AVRCRDNG@F...>
        wrote:
        >
        > I'll certainly defer to Ram, but I have hearing about
        > this for months and his association with Abramhoff
        > goes back to the 80s, and did you know that Reed was
        > kicked off a school newspaper for plagiarism.
        >
        > --- Greg Cannon <gregcannon1@y...> wrote:
        >
        > > Ram, from your position in Georgia, does this seem
        > > true?
      • THOMAS JOHNSON
        He s done..I m starting to believe in karma again HOUSTON - Barely one of every five of former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay s constituents would vote for
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 15 1:25 AM
          He's done..I'm starting to believe in karma again

          HOUSTON - Barely one of every five of former House
          Majority Leader
          Tom DeLay's constituents would vote for him if the
          election were held now, according to a newspaper poll
          released Saturday.



          The Republican congressman, who lost his leadership
          post because of felony money laundering charges
          against him, trailed Democratic rival and former
          congressman Nick Lampson in his southeastern Texas
          district, according to the poll of 560 registered
          voters conducted for the Houston Chronicle.

          In polling conducted Tuesday through Thursday, 22
          percent of respondents said they would vote for DeLay,
          30 percent chose Lampson and 11 percent favored
          Republican-turned-independent former congressman Steve
          Stockman.

          Lampson's campaign manager, Mike Malaise, said the
          poll suggests that "people in the district want a
          congressman who will make headlines for the right
          reasons."

          DeLay's spokeswoman Shannon Flaherty challenged the
          validity of the poll and said the result is "contrary
          to the strong support we're seeing for Congressman
          DeLay throughout the district."

          In 2004, DeLay defeated relatively unknown Democrat
          Richard Morrison with 55 percent of the vote, his
          lowest victory margin.

          In the latest poll, only half of those who supported
          DeLay in 2004 said they would vote for him again.

          The poll, conducted by Rice University and the
          University of Houston, has a margin of error was plus
          or minus 4 percentage points.

          The poll was conducted days after DeLay announced he
          would not try to regain his House leadership post
          under pressure from Republicans concerned about his
          ties to disgraced lobbyist Jack Abramoff, who pleaded
          guilty this month to felony charges and is cooperating
          with investigators in a bribery probe focusing on
          several members of Congress and their aides.

          In Texas, DeLay is charged with money laundering in
          connection with the transfer of $190,000 in corporate
          contributions through a Texas political action
          committee founded by DeLay to an arm of the National
          Republican Committee, which then contributed the
          similar amounts to GOP legislative candidates in
          Texas.

          Republicans took control of the Texas Legislature
          after the 2002 elections, and pushed through a
          congressional redistricting plan favorable to the GOP
          that DeLay engineered.

          * Email Story
          * IM Story
          * Discuss
          * Printable View



          --- Greg Cannon <gregcannon1@...> wrote:

          > Ram, from your position in Georgia, does this seem
          > true?
          >
          > --- Julie Keller <jakeller@...> wrote:
          >
          > > To: utepprogressives@yahoogroups.com
          > > From: "Julie Keller" <jakeller@...>
          > > Date: Fri, 13 Jan 2006 23:15:36 -0000
          > > Subject: [utepprogressives] Will Georgia be spared
          > > Ralph Reed?
          > >
          > > http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?
          > > pid=10000103&sid=aG6gHO3vwYZQ&refer=us
          > >
          > > Abramoff Scandal Threatens to Derail Reed's
          > > Political Ambitions
          > >
          > > Jan. 11 (Bloomberg) -- The Washington scandal over
          > > lobbyist Jack
          > > Abramoff may claim a casualty outside the nation's
          > > capital: Ralph
          > > Reed, a former presidential-campaign adviser who
          > > once headed one of
          > > the U.S.'s largest Christian activist groups.
          > >
          > > Disclosures that Reed once ran an anti-gambling
          > > campaign that was
          > > secretly financed by casino-owning clients of his
          > > friend Abramoff
          > > have damaged his ability to raise funds for a bid
          > to
          > > become Georgia's
          > > next lieutenant governor, other Republicans say.
          > > That may undercut
          > > his chances of winning an office that he could use
          > > as a steppingstone
          > > to national political ambitions, they say.
          > >
          > > Campaign-finance reports filed this week show that
          > > Reed, 44, lagged
          > > behind opponent Casey Cagle in fundraising for the
          > > July 18 Republican
          > > primary during the past six months, after
          > collecting
          > > more than twice
          > > as much money as his rival before that. Cagle
          > raised
          > > $667,000 from
          > > June 30 to Dec. 31 to Reed's $404,000.
          > >
          > > ``A lot of those big corporate donors are now
          > > hedging their bets,''
          > > said Matt Towery, the 1990 Republican candidate
          > for
          > > lieutenant
          > > governor, who was once a colleague of Reed's on
          > > Capitol Hill. ``Ralph
          > > faces a very difficult and now problematic
          > > candidacy.''
          > >
          > > An Atlanta Journal-Constitution poll last month
          > > showed Cagle and Reed
          > > would perform about equally well against the
          > > Democrats in the
          > > November election. The poll was conducted by Zogby
          > > International
          > > before Abramoff pleaded guilty to fraud and
          > > conspiring to corrupt
          > > public officials.
          > >
          > > For Reed, who once seemed invincible, with broad
          > > support in his party
          > > and wide name recognition, that isn't good news,
          > > said Towery, who now
          > > publishes Insider Advantage, a guide to politics.
          > >
          > > Up the Ranks
          > >
          > > Reed, who is making his first run for public
          > office,
          > > climbed through
          > > the political ranks because of his connections in
          > > Christian and
          > > Republican circles. From 1989 to 1997, he ran the
          > > Christian Coalition
          > > of America, a then-powerful group founded by
          > > evangelist Pat
          > > Robertson. Reed served as a consultant to George
          > W.
          > > Bush's 2000
          > > presidential campaign and oversaw the Southeast
          > > region for his 2004
          > > re-election.
          > >
          > > Reed's fund-raising slowdown in the past six
          > months
          > > coincided with
          > > the drumbeat of news about Abramoff and Reed's
          > > connections to him.
          > > Those ties are gaining more attention in the
          > > aftermath of Abramoff's
          > > Jan. 3 guilty plea and the widening probe into the
          > > potential bribery
          > > of lawmakers.
          > >
          > > ``There are concerns as to whether Ralph will
          > > continue to make
          > > headlines that are harmful to the party,'' said
          > Eric
          > > Johnson, who as
          > > the Georgia Senate's president pro tem is a top
          > > Republican. Johnson
          > > said he's staying neutral in the primary election.
          >
          > >
          > > `Significant Doubts'
          > >
          > > The Cagle campaign is playing off those concerns.
          > > ``The polling data
          > > we've seen as well as fund raising show how people
          > > in Georgia have
          > > significant doubts about whether they can trust
          > > Ralph,'' Cagle
          > > spokesman Brad Alexander said.
          > >
          > > Reed is still ahead of Cagle, 39, in overall
          > > fundraising, having
          > > collected a total of $1.8 million to Cagle's $1.3
          > > million.
          > >
          > > ``We raised more from more donors on our first
          > > report than our
          > > primary opponent has raised in two reports,'' Reed
          > > spokeswoman Lisa
          > > Baron said. ``It is not uncommon for second
          > reports
          > > after such a
          > > strong first report to reflect the obvious, which
          > is
          > > many donors have
          > > already contributed the maximum.''
          > >
          > > Reed declined to comment for this article.
          > >
          > > Tarnished Image
          > >
          > > Reed's image as someone more interested in
          > Christian
          > > causes than his
          > > own financial well-being has been tarnished by a
          > > stream of e-mails
          > > released by a Senate committee that investigated
          > > Abramoff's bilking
          > > of Indian-tribe clients.
          > >
          > > ``I need to start humping in corporate accounts,''
          > > Reed wrote to
          > > Abramoff in 1998. ``I'm counting on you to help me
          > > with some
          > > contacts.''
          > >
          > > In 2001 alone, he received more than $2.5 million
          > > from entities
          > > connected with Abramoff and partner Michael
          > Scanlon,
          > > according to
          > > documents released by the Senate Indian Affairs
          > > Committee.
          > >
          > > Abramoff and Scanlon used the organizations so
          > Reed
          > > wouldn't be paid
          > > directly by their clients, who wanted to block new
          > > gambling
          > > competition. The e-mails show that Reed knew
          > > casino-owning tribes
          > > were the ultimate clients, though he says he
          > wasn't
          > > paid with
          > > gambling proceeds.
          > >
          > > ``Had I known then what I know now, I would not
          > have
          > > undertaken that
          > > work,'' Reed said in the text of a Dec. 9 speech
          > to
          > > a Georgia youth
          > > group. ``On reflection and with the benefit of
          > > hindsight, it is clear
          > > it associated my longstanding opposition to
          > gambling
          > > with those who
          > > did not share it and has caused difficulty for the
          > > faith community
          > > with whom I worked.''
          > >
          > > Connections
          > >
          > > Reed and Abramoff have known each other since the
          > > early 1980s, when
          > > they were leaders of the College Republicans along
          >
          === message truncated ===
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