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Re: [prezveepsenator] Re: Bob Woodward testifies in Libby case

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  • Greg Cannon
    Gregory, I agree, it is a very odd situation. And I just heard something about Libby s lawyers saying Woodward s statement is not totally true. I don t know
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 16, 2005
      Gregory,

      I agree, it is a very odd situation. And I just heard
      something about Libby's lawyers saying Woodward's
      statement is not totally true. I don't know the
      details on what they're saying.

      Greg

      --- Gregory <greggolopry@...> wrote:

      > Greg,
      >
      > I think this is most amusing...or amazing...what
      > great spy writer
      > could ever have a manuscript that would rival this
      > real-life one?
      >
      > Gregory
      >
      > --- In prezveepsenator@yahoogroups.com, Greg Cannon
      > <gregcannon1@y...> wrote:
      > >
      > > http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/nation/ny-
      >
      usleak1117,0,3027577.story?coll=ny-leadnationalnews-headlines
      > >
      > > Woodward was told of Plame more than two years ago
      > >
      > > By Jim VandeHei and Carol D. Leonnig
      > > THE WASHINGTON POST
      > >
      > > November 16, 2005, 7:59 AM EST
      > >
      > > WASHINGTON -- Washington Post Assistant Managing
      > > Editor Bob Woodward testified under oath Monday in
      > the
      > > CIA leak case that a senior administration
      > official
      > > told him about CIA operative Valerie Plame and her
      > > position at the agency nearly a month before her
      > > identity was disclosed.
      > >
      > > In a more than two-hour deposition, Woodward told
      > > Special Counsel Patrick J. Fitzgerald that the
      > > official casually told him in mid-June 2003 that
      > Plame
      > > worked as a CIA analyst on weapons of mass
      > > destruction, and that he did not believe the
      > > information to be classified or sensitive,
      > according
      > > to a statement Woodward released yesterday.
      > >
      > > Fitzgerald interviewed Woodward about the
      > previously
      > > undisclosed conversation after the official
      > alerted
      > > the prosecutor to it on Nov. 3 -- one week after
      > Vice
      > > President Cheney's chief of staff, I. Lewis
      > "Scooter"
      > > Libby, was indicted in the investigation.
      > >
      > > Citing a confidentiality agreement in which the
      > source
      > > freed Woodward to testify but would not allow him
      > to
      > > discuss their conversations publicly, Woodward and
      > > Post editors refused to disclose the official's
      > name
      > > or provide crucial details about the testimony.
      > > Woodward did not share the information with
      > Washington
      > > Post Executive Editor Leonard Downie Jr. until
      > last
      > > month, and the only Post reporter whom Woodward
      > said
      > > he remembers telling in the summer of 2003 does
      > not
      > > recall the conversation taking place.
      > >
      > > Woodward said he also testified that he met with
      > Libby
      > > on June 27, 2003, and discussed Iraq policy as
      > part of
      > > his research for a book on President Bush's march
      > to
      > > war. He said he does not believe Libby said
      > anything
      > > about Plame.
      > >
      > > He also told Fitzgerald that it is possible he
      > asked
      > > Libby about Plame or her husband, former
      > ambassador
      > > Joseph C. Wilson IV. He based that testimony on an
      > > 18-page list of questions he planned to ask Libby
      > in
      > > an interview that included the phrases
      > "yellowcake"
      > > and "Joe Wilson's wife." Woodward said in his
      > > statement, however, that "I had no recollection"
      > of
      > > mentioning the pair to Libby. He also said that
      > his
      > > original government source did not mention Plame
      > by
      > > name, referring to her only as "Wilson's wife."
      > >
      > > Woodward's testimony appears to change key
      > elements in
      > > the chronology Fitzgerald laid out in his
      > > investigation and announced when indicting Libby
      > three
      > > weeks ago. It would make the unnamed official --
      > not
      > > Libby -- the first government employee to disclose
      > > Plame's CIA employment to a reporter. It would
      > also
      > > make Woodward, who has been publicly critical of
      > the
      > > investigation, the first reporter known to have
      > > learned about Plame from a government source.
      > >
      > > The testimony, however, does not appear to shed
      > new
      > > light on whether Libby is guilty of lying and
      > > obstructing justice in the nearly two-year-old
      > probe
      > > or provide new insight into the role of senior
      > Bush
      > > adviser Karl Rove, who remains under
      > investigation.
      > >
      > > Mark Corallo, a spokesman for Rove, said that Rove
      > is
      > > not the unnamed official who told Woodward about
      > Plame
      > > and that he did not discuss Plame with Woodward.
      > >
      > > William Jeffress Jr., one of Libby's lawyers, said
      > > yesterday that Woodward's testimony undermines
      > > Fitzgerald's public claims about his client and
      > raises
      > > questions about what else the prosecutor may not
      > know.
      > > Libby has said he learned Plame's identity from
      > NBC's
      > > Tim Russert.
      > >
      > > "If what Woodward says is so, will Mr. Fitzgerald
      > now
      > > say he was wrong to say on TV that Scooter Libby
      > was
      > > the first official to give this information to a
      > > reporter?" Jeffress said last night. "The second
      > > question I would have is: Why did Mr. Fitzgerald
      > > indict Mr. Libby before fully investigating what
      > other
      > > reporters knew about Wilson's wife?"
      > >
      > > Fitzgerald has spent nearly two years
      > investigating
      > > whether senior Bush administration officials
      > illegally
      > > leaked classified information -- Plame's identity
      > as a
      > > CIA operative -- to reporters to discredit
      > allegations
      > > made by Wilson. Plame's name was revealed in a
      > July
      > > 14, 2003, column by Robert D. Novak, eight days
      > after
      > > Wilson publicly accused the administration of
      > twisting
      > > intelligence to justify the Iraq war. Fitzgerald's
      > > spokesman, Randall Samborn, declined to comment
      > > yesterday.
      > >
      > > Woodward is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative
      > > reporter and author best known for exposing the
      > > Watergate scandal and keeping secret for 30 years
      > the
      > > identity of his government source "Deep Throat."
      > >
      > > "It was the first time in 35 years as a reporter
      > that
      > > I have been asked to provide information to a
      > grand
      > > jury," he said in the statement.
      > >
      > > Downie said The Post waited until late yesterday
      > to
      > > disclose Woodward's deposition in the case in
      > hopes of
      > > persuading his sources to allow him to speak
      > publicly.
      > > Woodward declined to elaborate on the statement he
      > > released to The Post late yesterday afternoon and
      > > publicly last night. He would not answer any
      > > questions, including those not governed by his
      > > confidentiality agreement with sources.
      > >
      > > According to his statement, Woodward also
      > testified
      > > about a third unnamed source. He told Fitzgerald
      > that
      > > he does not recall discussing Plame with this
      > person
      > > when they spoke on June 20, 2003.
      > >
      > > It is unclear what prompted Woodward's original
      > > unnamed source to alert Fitzgerald to the mid-June
      >
      === message truncated ===
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