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How about Calvin Coolidge?

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  • Ram Lau
    Does anyone care to know anything about him?
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 10, 2004
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      Does anyone care to know anything about him?
    • greg
      Sure. I think he pardoned Eugene Debs. What else is there to say about him? Here s my collected quotes from him (and one that mentions him): Prosperity is only
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 10, 2004
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        Sure. I think he pardoned Eugene Debs. What else is there to say about
        him?
        Here's my collected quotes from him (and one that mentions him):

        Prosperity is only an instrument to be used, not a deity to be worshipped.
        -Calvin Coolidge

        Four fifths of all our troubles in this life would disappear, if we
        would only sit down and keep still.
        -Calvin Coolidge

        Perhaps one of the most important accomplishments of my administration
        has been minding my own business.
        -Calvin Coolidge, March 1, 1929

        In a legendary smoke-filled room of the Blackstone Hotel a little
        group of shirt-sleeved men chose as their candidate a figure stuffed
        with straw and this figure they stood up and he was nominated next day
        under the name of Warren G. Harding.
        The convention went through the form of taking ballots. The vote was
        taken, the roll was called, state by state, an empty farce. It
        happened that I had met Warren G. Harding a few years before in
        Cleveland. He and I had been speakers at a large convention. I had sat
        listening to his speech and as I listened I had thought, then, "Here
        is a living cartoon of the American Fourth of July stuffed-shirt orator."
        I had gone into that convention firm in the belief that the World War
        had taught us something. I had thought that the Peace of 1918 and the
        Wilsonian plan that followed it would bring a measure of new dignity,
        of universal humanity into a war-torn world. It now sounds incredibly
        naive but nevertheless I did believe this then.
        Now, in the trumped-up fanfare that followed the nomination of Harding
        I felt these beliefs being torn from me as a child, helpless, is
        bereft of her toys. I knew that I was going to cry. I tried hard not
        to. Perhaps I was weary, nervous, a little hysterical from the noise
        and the heat and the excitement. But I knew deep down that it was the
        horrible pain of disillusionment in my country and my people that was
        making me weep. I stared steadily at a small round window high up near
        the ceiling of the vast room. If you stare very hard with your eyes
        wide open you sometimes can hold back the tears. So I stared. The
        window was dirty and festooned with cobwebs. The clamor went on
        outside and inside me. The stony-eyed effort was not going to work.
        Two tears slid down my cheeks and plopped onto the front of the blue
        dress; two more, two more.
        Bill McNutt, just beside me, put his great hand over mine. "Don't
        bother," he said. "Doesn't matter ... hundred years from now."
        Then they nominated Calvin Coolidge for Vice-President. And then a
        very strange thing happened. That same William Slavens McNutt made a
        prediction and it came true. McNutt was a war correspondent and
        special writer; a gigantic fellow, hard-boiled, tenderhearted; wise
        with the terrible wisdom of the experienced and intuitive
        newspaperman. He had a great fist that looked as if it could fell an
        ox with a blow. This massive member was now brought down on the pine
        table with such force that we though he had splintered the boards. The
        combined press section jumped.
        "There goes Harding!" bawled McNutt.
        "What do you mean?" I asked, rather waspishly.
        "Harding'll never serve his term out. He'll die and Coolidge will be
        President."
        "Don't be silly. What makes you say a thing like that?"
        "Wait. You'll see. Coolidge luck. He's shot with it."
        -Edna Ferber, A Peculiar Treasure

        --- In prezveepsenator@yahoogroups.com, "Ram Lau" <ramlau@y...> wrote:
        > Does anyone care to know anything about him?
      • Ram Lau
        Almost! Warren Harding, whom Coolidge served as Veep, pardoned Debs. :-) The quotes and the article are great, Greg. By the way, Coolidge luck also translated
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 10, 2004
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          Almost! Warren Harding, whom Coolidge served as Veep, pardoned
          Debs. :-) The quotes and the article are great, Greg. By the way,
          Coolidge luck also translated to "Hoover mishap." I always think
          that Coolidge knew something terrible would happen when he decided
          not to seek re-election in 1928. Also, unlike what the high-school
          teachers told us, Coolidge was known to be a very warm and
          interesting guy among family and friends.

          One last Coolidge quote:
          "The things I did not say never hurt me."
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