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Hubert Humphrey's impact on 2 presidencies

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  • THOMAS JOHNSON
    I recently caught part of a lecture by one John Stewart, who had worked on Hubert Humphrey s staff during the passing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Though
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 23, 2005
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      I recently caught part of a lecture by one John
      Stewart, who had worked on Hubert Humphrey's staff
      during the passing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.
      Though obviously a modest man, he said he probably
      knew more about the forging of that legislation than
      any man alive, and he asserted that LBJ was fairly
      hands off on putting it together because he had
      delegated it to Humphrey, who handled it so adeptly
      that there was not much reason to meddle.
      Pulitzer Prize winning historian David McCullough has
      written that HHH contributed more to Harry Truman's
      re-election in 1948 than did Truman himself, by giving
      a speech at the 1948 Democratic Convention in favor of
      a civil rights plank in the platform, which was
      adopted. Though it caused some southern Democrats to
      walk out and form the Dixiecrats party, that was more
      than offset by the votes picked up from the northern
      black vote. Incidentally the Dixiecrats nominated
      Strom Thurmond, to whom Trent Lott was referring in
      his 2002 misfire that got him bounced from his Senate
      Majority leadership.

      Tom


      --- THOMAS JOHNSON <AVRCRDNG@...> wrote:


      ---------------------------------
      From Maureen Dowd's 8/20/05 column in the New York
      Times:

      Richard Nixon once gave me a lesson in the politics of
      war.

      Howell Raines, then the Washington bureau chief for
      The Times, took some reporters to meet Mr. Nixon right
      before the 1992 New Hampshire primary. The deposed
      president had requested that Howell bring along only
      reporters who were too young to have covered
      Watergate, so we tried to express an excess of
      Juvenalia spirit.
      Before the first vote of '92 was cast, Mr. Nixon laid
      out, state by state, how Bill Clinton, who was not
      even a sure bet for the Democratic nomination at that
      point, was going to defeat George Bush.
      If, Mr. Nixon said, Bill could keep a lid on Hillary
      (who had worked on the House Judiciary Committee
      looking into the Nixon impeachment), he'd have it
      made.
      "If the wife comes through as being too strong and too
      intelligent, it makes the husband look like a wimp,"
      he said.
      In his jaundiced view, the first President Bush had
      squandered his best re-election card: if the Persian
      Gulf war had still been going on, Mr. Bush could have
      been benefiting from that.
      "We had a lot of success with that in 1972," Mr. Nixon
      told us, with that famously uneasy baring of teeth
      that passed for a smile.
      Was he actually admitting what all the paranoid
      liberals had been yelping about 20 years earlier -
      that he had prolonged the Vietnam War so he could get
      re-elected?




      I find it remarkable that he could predict the outcome
      of 1992, but the apparent lack of remorse over
      politically-motivated warmongering absolutely floors
      me.
      LBJ, in contrast, was reportedly torn up by he
      protesters chanting " Hey, hey LBJ.. How many kids did
      you kill today?' outside the Oval Office.

      Tom


      --- Ram Lau <ramlau@...> wrote:


      ---------------------------------
      Voting Rights Address by Lyndon Johnson in 1965:
      http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/lbjweshallovercome.htm

      I caught it on C-SPAN a couple of weeks ago. Here is a
      piece of excerpt:

      "And somehow you never forget what poverty and hatred
      can do when you
      see its scars on the hopeful face of a young child. I
      never thought
      then, in 1928, that I would be standing here in 1965.
      It never even
      occurred to me in my fondest dreams that I might have
      the chance to
      help the sons and daughters of those students and to
      help people like
      them all over this country.

      But now I do have that chance -- and I'll let you in
      on a secret -- I
      mean to use it."

      I've studied LBJ for a few years, and I could see that
      he pretty much
      meant what he said in that speech. He was sincere and
      very brave,
      knowing it was a political suicide for his Party and
      would cost him
      some political assets.

      Ram





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    • Ram Lau
      And, of course, I m predictably a Humphrey fan. I happen to have taped that program:
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 23, 2005
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        And, of course, I'm predictably a Humphrey fan. I happen to have taped
        that program:

        http://www.c-spanstore.org/shop/index.php?main_page=product_video_info&products_id=188129-1

        I first learned much about HHH and the very early days of the Civil
        Rights era after reading "The Walls of Jericho: Lyndon Johnson, Hubert
        Humphrey, Richard Russell, and the Struggle for Civil Rights" written
        by Robert Mann:

        http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0156005018/103-9560337-2998234?v=glance

        In my opinion, HHH is one of the most influential Senators in history.
        The DFLers have given the nation a good number of great statesmen, and
        Al Franken may be the next.

        Ram


        --- In prezveepsenator@yahoogroups.com, THOMAS JOHNSON <AVRCRDNG@F...>
        wrote:
        > I recently caught part of a lecture by one John
        > Stewart, who had worked on Hubert Humphrey's staff
        > during the passing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.
        > Though obviously a modest man, he said he probably
        > knew more about the forging of that legislation than
        > any man alive, and he asserted that LBJ was fairly
        > hands off on putting it together because he had
        > delegated it to Humphrey, who handled it so adeptly
        > that there was not much reason to meddle.
        > Pulitzer Prize winning historian David McCullough has
        > written that HHH contributed more to Harry Truman's
        > re-election in 1948 than did Truman himself, by giving
        > a speech at the 1948 Democratic Convention in favor of
        > a civil rights plank in the platform, which was
        > adopted. Though it caused some southern Democrats to
        > walk out and form the Dixiecrats party, that was more
        > than offset by the votes picked up from the northern
        > black vote. Incidentally the Dixiecrats nominated
        > Strom Thurmond, to whom Trent Lott was referring in
        > his 2002 misfire that got him bounced from his Senate
        > Majority leadership.
        >
        > Tom
        >
        >
        > --- THOMAS JOHNSON <AVRCRDNG@F...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > From Maureen Dowd's 8/20/05 column in the New York
        > Times:
        >
        > Richard Nixon once gave me a lesson in the politics of
        > war.
        >
        > Howell Raines, then the Washington bureau chief for
        > The Times, took some reporters to meet Mr. Nixon right
        > before the 1992 New Hampshire primary. The deposed
        > president had requested that Howell bring along only
        > reporters who were too young to have covered
        > Watergate, so we tried to express an excess of
        > Juvenalia spirit.
        > Before the first vote of '92 was cast, Mr. Nixon laid
        > out, state by state, how Bill Clinton, who was not
        > even a sure bet for the Democratic nomination at that
        > point, was going to defeat George Bush.
        > If, Mr. Nixon said, Bill could keep a lid on Hillary
        > (who had worked on the House Judiciary Committee
        > looking into the Nixon impeachment), he'd have it
        > made.
        > "If the wife comes through as being too strong and too
        > intelligent, it makes the husband look like a wimp,"
        > he said.
        > In his jaundiced view, the first President Bush had
        > squandered his best re-election card: if the Persian
        > Gulf war had still been going on, Mr. Bush could have
        > been benefiting from that.
        > "We had a lot of success with that in 1972," Mr. Nixon
        > told us, with that famously uneasy baring of teeth
        > that passed for a smile.
        > Was he actually admitting what all the paranoid
        > liberals had been yelping about 20 years earlier -
        > that he had prolonged the Vietnam War so he could get
        > re-elected?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > I find it remarkable that he could predict the outcome
        > of 1992, but the apparent lack of remorse over
        > politically-motivated warmongering absolutely floors
        > me.
        > LBJ, in contrast, was reportedly torn up by he
        > protesters chanting " Hey, hey LBJ.. How many kids did
        > you kill today?' outside the Oval Office.
        >
        > Tom
        >
        >
        > --- Ram Lau <ramlau@y...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > Voting Rights Address by Lyndon Johnson in 1965:
        > http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/lbjweshallovercome.htm
        >
        > I caught it on C-SPAN a couple of weeks ago. Here is a
        > piece of excerpt:
        >
        > "And somehow you never forget what poverty and hatred
        > can do when you
        > see its scars on the hopeful face of a young child. I
        > never thought
        > then, in 1928, that I would be standing here in 1965.
        > It never even
        > occurred to me in my fondest dreams that I might have
        > the chance to
        > help the sons and daughters of those students and to
        > help people like
        > them all over this country.
        >
        > But now I do have that chance -- and I'll let you in
        > on a secret -- I
        > mean to use it."
        >
        > I've studied LBJ for a few years, and I could see that
        > he pretty much
        > meant what he said in that speech. He was sincere and
        > very brave,
        > knowing it was a political suicide for his Party and
        > would cost him
        > some political assets.
        >
        > Ram
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > SPONSORED LINKS
        >
        > President bush
        > Supreme court justices
        > President
        > Supreme court
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        >
        >
        > Visit your group "prezveepsenator" on the web.
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > prezveepsenator-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
        > Terms of Service.
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
        >
        >
        > Visit your group "prezveepsenator" on the web.
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > prezveepsenator-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
        > Terms of Service.
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
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