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2129Re: Reagan, the South and Civil Rights

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  • Ram Lau
    Jan 18, 2007
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      I was in DC during the MLK weekend, and saw all the museums and
      memorials. The good stuff. Enjoyed it all.

      There were quite a few "important" 20th century people on my list. I
      agree with those that you all have already mentioned, but I'd add
      Eleanor Roosevelt, Earl Warren, Thurgood Marshall, Albert Einstein,
      Lyndon Johnson (as a Senator and a President), and Hubert Humphrey.
      Note that Johnson and Humphrey were the only Americans who have served
      as the Vice President to lie in state at the Capitol besides Henry
      Wilson, who died in his Senate office in 1875.

      I'm glad that nobody has brought up the Kennedys and Reagan yet.

      Ram


      --- In prezveepsenator@yahoogroups.com, THOMAS JOHNSON <AVRCRDNG@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > And you could well be right, Richard, especially in
      > the cases of the Roosevelts.. Teddy for his hand into
      > turning the US into a dominant world power and FDR for
      > changing the way that people looked to the US govt.
      > It's a fun topic to bat around.
      >
      > Tom
      >
      >
      > --- richard kelly <richwkelly@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Tom:
      > >
      > > You could be right. The latest issue of Atlantic
      > > Monthly has a good article on the 100 most
      > > influential
      > > Americans and Dr. King is listed as number 8 or 9,
      > > up
      > > there with the likes of Thomas Jefferson, George
      > > Washington, Alexander Hamilton, Abraham Lincoln, Ben
      > > Franklin and Franklin D. Roosevelt.
      > >
      > > Richard Kelly
      > >
      > > --- THOMAS JOHNSON <AVRCRDNG@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > > I would repectfully disagree with that, Richard.
      > > > With
      > > > exception oF Wilson, I'm a fan of all those guys,
      > > > but
      > > > I'm not sure any of them had the long term impact
      > > of
      > > > MLK. It's a fun discussion and I appreciate your
      > > > opinion.
      > > >
      > > > Tom
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- richard kelly <richwkelly@...> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > Tom:
      > > > >
      > > > > Actually there are several more important
      > > American
      > > > > figures, for starters, Theodore and Franklin D.
      > > > > Roosevelt, Ike, Harry Truman, and Woodrow
      > > Wilson.
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Richard Kelly
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > --- THOMAS JOHNSON <AVRCRDNG@...> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > > Great post, Ram.. Incidentally, can anyone
      > > think
      > > > > of
      > > > > > a
      > > > > > more important American historical figure in
      > > the
      > > > > > 20th
      > > > > > century than MLK?
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Tom
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > --- Ram Lau <ramlau@...> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > > Reagan, the South and Civil Rights
      > > > > > > By Juan Williams
      > > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
      http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1953700&columnId=1929301
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > NPR.org, June 10, 2004 ยท Forty years after
      > > the
      > > > > > > passage of 1964 Civil
      > > > > > > Rights Act, history and politics are
      > > > celebrating
      > > > > a
      > > > > > > strange
      > > > > > > convergence: It was the passage of the Civil
      > > > > > Rights
      > > > > > > Act that launched
      > > > > > > the rise of the president who died last
      > > week,
      > > > > > Ronald
      > > > > > > Reagan.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > The Civil Rights Act, signed July 2, 1964,
      > > by
      > > > > > > President Lyndon
      > > > > > > Johnson, ended legal discrimination against
      > > > > blacks
      > > > > > > at hotels,
      > > > > > > restaurants and department stores. It also
      > > > made
      > > > > > > discrimination illegal
      > > > > > > in hiring. Barry Goldwater, the Republican
      > > > > > > presidential nominee that
      > > > > > > year, decided to make himself a voice for
      > > > > > opponents
      > > > > > > of the Act.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Goldwater said he supported the white
      > > Southern
      > > > > > > position on civil
      > > > > > > rights, which was that each and every state
      > > > had
      > > > > a
      > > > > > > sovereign right to
      > > > > > > control its laws. The Arizona Republican
      > > > argued
      > > > > > that
      > > > > > > each American has
      > > > > > > the right to decide whom to hire, whom to do
      > > > > > > business with and whom to
      > > > > > > welcome in his or her restaurant. The
      > > senator
      > > > > was
      > > > > > > right at home with
      > > > > > > Southern politicians who called the Civil
      > > > Rights
      > > > > > Act
      > > > > > > an attack on "the
      > > > > > > Southern way of life."
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > To overcome the forces arrayed against the
      > > > bill,
      > > > > > > Johnson needed every
      > > > > > > bit of his political skill and every bit of
      > > > > > > emotional aftermath from
      > > > > > > the previous November's assassination of
      > > > > President
      > > > > > > John F. Kennedy.
      > > > > > > But once the bill had passed, Johnson told
      > > > > > > confidants that Democrats
      > > > > > > might have lost the South to Republicans for
      > > > > years
      > > > > > > to come. He was
      > > > > > > exactly right.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Today the South is solidly Republican. In
      > > > every
      > > > > > > presidential election
      > > > > > > since 1964 -- save the election of Jimmy
      > > > Carter
      > > > > in
      > > > > > > 1976 -- Dixie has
      > > > > > > been the heart of GOP presidential politics.
      > > > The
      > > > > > > white Southern vote
      > > > > > > was key to the Republican takeover of
      > > Congress
      > > > > in
      > > > > > > 1994, and President
      > > > > > > George W. Bush was elected in 2000 because
      > > he
      > > > > > > carried every Southern
      > > > > > > state.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Ronald Reagan was key to the South's
      > > > transition
      > > > > to
      > > > > > > Republican
      > > > > > > politics. Goldwater got the ball rolling,
      > > but
      > > > > > Reagan
      > > > > > > was at his side
      > > > > > > from the very beginning. During the 1964
      > > > > campaign,
      > > > > > > Reagan gave
      > > > > > > speeches in support of Goldwater and spoke
      > > out
      > > > > for
      > > > > > > what he called
      > > > > > > individual rights -- read that also as
      > > states'
      > > > > > > rights. Reagan also and
      > > > > > > portrayed any opposition as support for
      > > > > > > totalitarianism -- read that
      > > > > > > as communism.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > In 1976, Reagan sought the Republican
      > > > nomination
      > > > > > > against the incumbent
      > > > > > > President Gerald Ford. Reagan's campaign was
      > > > on
      > > > > > the
      > > > > > > ropes until the
      > > > > > > primaries hit the Southern states, where he
      > > > won
      > > > > > his
      > > > > > > first key victory
      > > > > > > in North Carolina. Throughout the South that
      > > > > > spring
      > > > > > > and summer, Reagan
      > > > > > > portrayed himself as Goldwater's heir while
      > > > > > > criticizing Ford as a
      > > > > > > captive of Eastern establishment Republicans
      > > > > > fixated
      > > > > > > on forced
      > > > > > > integration.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Reagan lost the nomination to Ford in 1976.
      > > > But
      > > > > > when
      > > > > > > the former
      > >
      > === message truncated ===
      >
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