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2128Re: [prezveepsenator] Reagan, the South and Civil Rights

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  • THOMAS JOHNSON
    Jan 17, 2007
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      And you could well be right, Richard, especially in
      the cases of the Roosevelts.. Teddy for his hand into
      turning the US into a dominant world power and FDR for
      changing the way that people looked to the US govt.
      It's a fun topic to bat around.

      Tom


      --- richard kelly <richwkelly@...> wrote:

      > Tom:
      >
      > You could be right. The latest issue of Atlantic
      > Monthly has a good article on the 100 most
      > influential
      > Americans and Dr. King is listed as number 8 or 9,
      > up
      > there with the likes of Thomas Jefferson, George
      > Washington, Alexander Hamilton, Abraham Lincoln, Ben
      > Franklin and Franklin D. Roosevelt.
      >
      > Richard Kelly
      >
      > --- THOMAS JOHNSON <AVRCRDNG@...> wrote:
      >
      > > I would repectfully disagree with that, Richard.
      > > With
      > > exception oF Wilson, I'm a fan of all those guys,
      > > but
      > > I'm not sure any of them had the long term impact
      > of
      > > MLK. It's a fun discussion and I appreciate your
      > > opinion.
      > >
      > > Tom
      > >
      > >
      > > --- richard kelly <richwkelly@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > > Tom:
      > > >
      > > > Actually there are several more important
      > American
      > > > figures, for starters, Theodore and Franklin D.
      > > > Roosevelt, Ike, Harry Truman, and Woodrow
      > Wilson.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Richard Kelly
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- THOMAS JOHNSON <AVRCRDNG@...> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > Great post, Ram.. Incidentally, can anyone
      > think
      > > > of
      > > > > a
      > > > > more important American historical figure in
      > the
      > > > > 20th
      > > > > century than MLK?
      > > > >
      > > > > Tom
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > --- Ram Lau <ramlau@...> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > > Reagan, the South and Civil Rights
      > > > > > By Juan Williams
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
      http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1953700&columnId=1929301
      > > > > >
      > > > > > NPR.org, June 10, 2004 ยท Forty years after
      > the
      > > > > > passage of 1964 Civil
      > > > > > Rights Act, history and politics are
      > > celebrating
      > > > a
      > > > > > strange
      > > > > > convergence: It was the passage of the Civil
      > > > > Rights
      > > > > > Act that launched
      > > > > > the rise of the president who died last
      > week,
      > > > > Ronald
      > > > > > Reagan.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > The Civil Rights Act, signed July 2, 1964,
      > by
      > > > > > President Lyndon
      > > > > > Johnson, ended legal discrimination against
      > > > blacks
      > > > > > at hotels,
      > > > > > restaurants and department stores. It also
      > > made
      > > > > > discrimination illegal
      > > > > > in hiring. Barry Goldwater, the Republican
      > > > > > presidential nominee that
      > > > > > year, decided to make himself a voice for
      > > > > opponents
      > > > > > of the Act.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Goldwater said he supported the white
      > Southern
      > > > > > position on civil
      > > > > > rights, which was that each and every state
      > > had
      > > > a
      > > > > > sovereign right to
      > > > > > control its laws. The Arizona Republican
      > > argued
      > > > > that
      > > > > > each American has
      > > > > > the right to decide whom to hire, whom to do
      > > > > > business with and whom to
      > > > > > welcome in his or her restaurant. The
      > senator
      > > > was
      > > > > > right at home with
      > > > > > Southern politicians who called the Civil
      > > Rights
      > > > > Act
      > > > > > an attack on "the
      > > > > > Southern way of life."
      > > > > >
      > > > > > To overcome the forces arrayed against the
      > > bill,
      > > > > > Johnson needed every
      > > > > > bit of his political skill and every bit of
      > > > > > emotional aftermath from
      > > > > > the previous November's assassination of
      > > > President
      > > > > > John F. Kennedy.
      > > > > > But once the bill had passed, Johnson told
      > > > > > confidants that Democrats
      > > > > > might have lost the South to Republicans for
      > > > years
      > > > > > to come. He was
      > > > > > exactly right.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Today the South is solidly Republican. In
      > > every
      > > > > > presidential election
      > > > > > since 1964 -- save the election of Jimmy
      > > Carter
      > > > in
      > > > > > 1976 -- Dixie has
      > > > > > been the heart of GOP presidential politics.
      > > The
      > > > > > white Southern vote
      > > > > > was key to the Republican takeover of
      > Congress
      > > > in
      > > > > > 1994, and President
      > > > > > George W. Bush was elected in 2000 because
      > he
      > > > > > carried every Southern
      > > > > > state.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Ronald Reagan was key to the South's
      > > transition
      > > > to
      > > > > > Republican
      > > > > > politics. Goldwater got the ball rolling,
      > but
      > > > > Reagan
      > > > > > was at his side
      > > > > > from the very beginning. During the 1964
      > > > campaign,
      > > > > > Reagan gave
      > > > > > speeches in support of Goldwater and spoke
      > out
      > > > for
      > > > > > what he called
      > > > > > individual rights -- read that also as
      > states'
      > > > > > rights. Reagan also and
      > > > > > portrayed any opposition as support for
      > > > > > totalitarianism -- read that
      > > > > > as communism.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > In 1976, Reagan sought the Republican
      > > nomination
      > > > > > against the incumbent
      > > > > > President Gerald Ford. Reagan's campaign was
      > > on
      > > > > the
      > > > > > ropes until the
      > > > > > primaries hit the Southern states, where he
      > > won
      > > > > his
      > > > > > first key victory
      > > > > > in North Carolina. Throughout the South that
      > > > > spring
      > > > > > and summer, Reagan
      > > > > > portrayed himself as Goldwater's heir while
      > > > > > criticizing Ford as a
      > > > > > captive of Eastern establishment Republicans
      > > > > fixated
      > > > > > on forced
      > > > > > integration.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Reagan lost the nomination to Ford in 1976.
      > > But
      > > > > when
      > > > > > the former
      >
      === message truncated ===
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