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XP - Insights into Social Networking and the Office (by a tech trade journal Editor-in-Chief)

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  • Ned Barnett
    I ve known Bob Scott for a lot of years - on 9/11, his office window gave him a full panorama of the attack, and via emails to selected friends and
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 3, 2009
      I've known Bob Scott for a lot of years - on 9/11, his office window gave
      him a full panorama of the attack, and via emails to selected friends and
      colleagues, he gave a running account that was both personally moving and
      technically a precursor of the best of blogging - but years ahead of time.
      Bob's magazine, Accounting Technology, has him dealing daily with high-tech
      issues. I thought his insights into Social Networking in business and the
      workplace (not as a PR tool, but as a fact of life) are insightful and
      interesting:



      ADVENTURES IN SOCIAL NETWORKING.
      It's probably a good sign for Twitter, but last week when I tried to tweet
      (I tweet, you tweet, he she or it tweets?), the system replied, "Twitter is
      over capacity. Too many tweets." Perhaps not everyone agrees with my raising
      the possibility that Twitter is an electronic pet rock, but I would say many
      would agree that efforts to use social networking tools gets contorted. It's
      like trying to use a garden hose to dig up your garden, instead of a trowel.
      And then there's the experience of trying to raise a business discussion on
      Facebook which is followed by a posting that "I just got back from the mall
      with the kids." Now, the media is trying to turn social networking into
      something journalistic. However, I don't think things are going to work the
      way many expect. And one of the problems is the convergence of home and
      office. There was a study reported this week that said those who use social
      networking at work can be more productive. I would think that can be said of
      anything that lets people rest their minds and recover concentration. But
      social networking or browsing the Web is as good as anything. However, what
      business is going to have to come to terms with is the blurring of home and
      office and that is going to take some creative approaches to company policy.
      I don't think companies can simply erect electronic barbed wire to keep the
      two separate.





      Ned Barnett, APR

      Marketing/PR Fellow, American Hospital Association



      Barnett Marketing Communications

      420 N. Nellis Blvd. A3-276

      Las Vegas NV 89110



      702-696-1200 - ned@...

      http://www.barnettmarcom.com





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