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Re: [prbytes] Employee Review Materials Needed

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  • Denise Baker
    Ned -- Thanks for the question. We are smaller than 25 employees. Can you make recommendations about what would work better? Thanks in advance. Denise
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 1, 2008
      Ned --

      Thanks for the question. We are smaller than 25 employees. Can you make
      recommendations about what would work better?

      Thanks in advance.

      Denise
      Director, Client Services
      Clary Communications
      www.clarycommunications.com
      http://www.linkedin.com/in/denisebaker


      On Tue, Apr 1, 2008 at 3:49 PM, Ned Barnett <ned@...> wrote:

      > How large is your agency? Your process sound great for a larger
      > organization (50-plus employees) but a bit formalized if you're 25 or
      > fewer
      > employees.
      >
      > Ned Barnett, APR
      >
      > Fellow in PR and Marketing, AHA
      >
      > Barnett Marketing Communications
      >
      > 420 N. Nellis Blvd., A3-276
      >
      > Las Vegas, NV 89110
      >
      > 702-696-1200
      >
      > <mailto:ned@... <ned%40barnettmarcom.com>>
      > ned@... <ned%40barnettmarcom.com>
      >
      > <http://www.barnettmarcom.com> http://www.barnettmarcom.com
      >
      > From: prbytes@yahoogroups.com <prbytes%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:
      > prbytes@yahoogroups.com <prbytes%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf Of
      > Denise Baker
      > Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2008 11:51 AM
      > To: prbytes@yahoogroups.com <prbytes%40yahoogroups.com>
      > Subject: [prbytes] Employee Review Materials Needed
      >
      >
      > I hope a few people can help me. I am Director, Client Services with a
      > public relations firm. I am a new manager with one employee. This
      > employee's
      > three-month review is coming up and I want to develop a streamlined,
      > effective review process. My goals would be to:
      >
      > * solicit feedback on the employee's performance from others in the
      > company
      > who work with this employee (this information will be worked into the
      > review)
      > * give positive and negative feedback based on work over past three months
      > * develop a list of improvement areas/goals for the six-month review
      > * develop a way to track improvement
      >
      > Does anyone have any forms or other materials that worked well during
      > performance reviews? Either materials that you have used or that someone
      > used for your reviews. Feel free to e-mail any items to me off-list.
      >
      > Also, if you would like to give me feedback on what to do or not to do
      > during the review, I'm open to all comments!
      >
      > Thanks in advance -- I really appreciate the help!
      >
      > Denise
      > Director, Client Services
      > Clary Communications
      > www.clarycommunications.com
      > http://www.linkedin.com/in/denisebaker
      >
      > --
      > The victory of success is half won when one gains the habit of setting
      > goals
      > and achieving them. Even the most tedious chore will become endurable as
      > you
      > parade through each day convinced that every task, no matter how menial or
      > boring, brings you closer to achieving your dreams.
      > Og Mandino
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >



      --
      The victory of success is half won when one gains the habit of setting goals
      and achieving them. Even the most tedious chore will become endurable as you
      parade through each day convinced that every task, no matter how menial or
      boring, brings you closer to achieving your dreams.
      Og Mandino


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ned Barnett
      Denise With a smaller company, a more informal process is probably easier and more effective. For instance, you can literally talk to everybody in the agency
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 2, 2008
        Denise



        With a smaller company, a more informal process is probably easier and more
        effective.



        For instance, you can literally talk to everybody in the agency who your
        employee has worked with, asking off-the-cuff for impressions, praise,
        concerns, etc. This can and should be done informally, over a cup of coffee
        - there is a real risk in small agencies that they'll try to adopt the
        bureaucracy of larger agencies (who can employ HR people to handle the
        bureaucracy) to no benefit. So don't do this in a formalized written format
        - just chat with them.


        Remember, once you put something on paper (or in emails) you run the risk
        that the employee will see what's on paper - and if s/he doesn't like what
        s/he sees, the document could become the basis of a costly lawsuit (having
        had to fire an employee from a small organization, I know that having
        documents on hand was only a headache).


        For the employee, put together a bullet-point list (for your own purposes)
        of:



        . Strengths - what you're doing right (and should do more of)



        . Weaknesses - attributes that you need to strengthen (gaps in
        knowledge, such as how to use an important kind of software, such as
        PowerPoint or Excel) - incorporate here ways that s/he can overcome these
        weaknesses (go to a seminar, participate in a self-study, etc.)



        . Lesser strengths - things that you're starting to get right (such
        as adopting the agency's approach to writing press releases) but which need
        more work - incorporate here ways that s/he can enhance these lesser
        strengths (go to a seminar, participate in a self-study, etc.)



        . Risk factors - areas the employee needs to FIX RIGHT NOW in order
        to not become surplus to the organization (the habit of coming in a
        half-hour late every day, for instance, or dressing inappropriately for
        client meetings) . if there are, in fact, real "risk factors" that could
        cost this employee his/her job, I suggest you set up weekly or bi-weekly
        review meetings - don't wait for the six-month review



        . Discuss where s/he wants to be, within the company, in six months
        and a year from now (then work with them to develop an action plan to get
        them from where they are to where they want to be



        Do not give the employee this bullet-point list - this is your "cheat-sheet"
        to make sure the review goes well. If you want to give the employee
        something in writing, do it after the fact (after you see how the review
        goes) and give them only those things you want/need them to have - such as
        the action-plan with steps to improve their performance and prepare them for
        the "next level" but without the negative critiques. You do not want to put
        that in writing, as it will only be used against you.



        You might think I'm going overboard, but this is the voice of experience.
        For your cheat-sheet (the points noted above), do not write it on the
        computer - do a hand-written punch-list strictly for your own use, then
        shred it after the meeting. Believe me, if an employee quits (or is fired)
        and sues, you'll be glad you don't have discoverable records. Big employers
        are set up to handle this - they have legal-approved forms and
        records-retention policies - but you don't, so keep it verbal until after
        the review session, when you write a summary of information the employee
        needs to improve his/her performance, without any negative in-writing
        critique.



        Hope this helps


        Ned



        Ned Barnett, APR

        Fellow in PR and Marketing, AHA



        Barnett Marketing Communications

        420 N. Nellis Blvd., A3-276

        Las Vegas, NV 89110

        702-696-1200

        <mailto:ned@...> ned@...

        <http://www.barnettmarcom.com> http://www.barnettmarcom.com



        From: prbytes@yahoogroups.com [mailto:prbytes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        Denise Baker
        Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2008 12:54 PM
        To: prbytes@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [prbytes] Employee Review Materials Needed



        Ned --

        Thanks for the question. We are smaller than 25 employees. Can you make
        recommendations about what would work better?

        Thanks in advance.

        Denise
        Director, Client Services
        Clary Communications
        www.clarycommunications.com
        http://www.linkedin.com/in/denisebaker

        On Tue, Apr 1, 2008 at 3:49 PM, Ned Barnett <ned@...
        <mailto:ned%40barnettmarcom.com> > wrote:

        > How large is your agency? Your process sound great for a larger
        > organization (50-plus employees) but a bit formalized if you're 25 or
        > fewer
        > employees.
        >
        > Ned Barnett, APR
        >
        > Fellow in PR and Marketing, AHA
        >
        > Barnett Marketing Communications
        >
        > 420 N. Nellis Blvd., A3-276
        >
        > Las Vegas, NV 89110
        >
        > 702-696-1200
        >
        > <mailto:ned@... <mailto:ned%40barnettmarcom.com>
        <ned%40barnettmarcom.com>>
        > ned@... <mailto:ned%40barnettmarcom.com>
        <ned%40barnettmarcom.com>
        >
        > <http://www.barnettmarcom.com> http://www.barnettmarcom.com
        >
        > From: prbytes@yahoogroups.com <mailto:prbytes%40yahoogroups.com>
        <prbytes%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:
        > prbytes@yahoogroups.com <mailto:prbytes%40yahoogroups.com>
        <prbytes%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf Of
        > Denise Baker
        > Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2008 11:51 AM
        > To: prbytes@yahoogroups.com <mailto:prbytes%40yahoogroups.com>
        <prbytes%40yahoogroups.com>
        > Subject: [prbytes] Employee Review Materials Needed
        >
        >
        > I hope a few people can help me. I am Director, Client Services with a
        > public relations firm. I am a new manager with one employee. This
        > employee's
        > three-month review is coming up and I want to develop a streamlined,
        > effective review process. My goals would be to:
        >
        > * solicit feedback on the employee's performance from others in the
        > company
        > who work with this employee (this information will be worked into the
        > review)
        > * give positive and negative feedback based on work over past three months
        > * develop a list of improvement areas/goals for the six-month review
        > * develop a way to track improvement
        >
        > Does anyone have any forms or other materials that worked well during
        > performance reviews? Either materials that you have used or that someone
        > used for your reviews. Feel free to e-mail any items to me off-list.
        >
        > Also, if you would like to give me feedback on what to do or not to do
        > during the review, I'm open to all comments!
        >
        > Thanks in advance -- I really appreciate the help!
        >
        > Denise
        > Director, Client Services
        > Clary Communications
        > www.clarycommunications.com
        > http://www.linkedin.com/in/denisebaker





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • kezia_jauron
        You can probably access performance review forms on the internet - and they re sold at Staples, etc. Filling out a form and having the employee sign it is
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 2, 2008
          You can probably access performance review forms on the internet - and
          they're sold at Staples, etc.

          Filling out a form and having the employee sign it is good. It shows
          that they were made aware of what it contains and they understand it.

          In the interest of transparency, I would send your request for
          feedback to coworkers in an email and have them respond likewise in an
          email. This paper trail should be helpful, not harmful, if it's done
          in an aboveboard and professional manner. I assume your coworkers know
          not to use inflammatory language or hate speech, in an email or
          elsewhere. (Pardon me for not having sympathy for the "poor
          corporation that got sued.")

          I understand wanting to protect the company from being sued by an
          employee, but I have a bigger issue with there being one person (you)
          responsible for assimilating verbal comments of all the others. A
          paper trail will also help you organize your thoughts, and protect you
          in case the employee develops a problem with you!

          You can have everyone relevant fill out a review form, then you
          compile it into one.

          Finally, I disagree about the "where do you see yourself" in six
          months, etc. That's not up to the employee, and that could provide
          false hope. Unless you have some hippie mentoring program in place,
          it's not your job to develop them professionally outside of the
          suggestions you're already giving them for their current position.
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