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Re: [prbytes] What's your style?

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  • Richard B Barger ABC APR
    - Internet - intranet - email (because it s simpler, takes less space [who cares?], and is readily understood and not often confused) - e-anythingelse -
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 28, 2007
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      - Internet
      - intranet
      - email (because it's simpler, takes less space [who cares?], and is
      readily understood and not often confused)
      - e-anythingelse
      - internal caps on URLs, where it will make them better-understood:
      Rich@..., Rich@..., eWorldWire.com
      - bullet points
      - "chunking"
      - Don't forget page titles and tags and other searchable, behind-the-scenes
      text or instructions

      Of course, if it's to be published in AP or elsewhere, their style wins
      over mine. The idea is coverage, not my ego.

      That's the top-of-the-head short list, Mike.

      Cheers!

      Rich Barger, ABC, APR
      The Words Guy
      http://www.CornerBarPR.com

      ---

      Michael Driehorst wrote:

      > I'm putting together an Internet term styleguide for my company, and am
      > curious as to what you typically use.
      >
      > Such as do you capitalize Internet? (Wired magazine doesn't.)
      >
      > What about e-mail v E-mail v email?
      >
      > What are some of the more common terms you use, and why do you use them
      > that way?
      >
      > I'm mostly using Dictionary.com for sources. Also looking at
      > Webopedia.com. Any other good, credible sources?
      >
      > Mike
      >
      > Mike Driehorst
      > Messaging Strategist
      >
      > H A N S O N I N C .
      > Maumee, Ohio 43537
    • kezia_jauron
      Wired Style (there s an actual book) was the bible back in the day - meaning 10 years ago or so - but I find a lot of it outdated now. I still capitalize
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 28, 2007
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        "Wired Style" (there's an actual book) was the bible back in the day -
        meaning 10 years ago or so - but I find a lot of it outdated now.

        I still capitalize "Internet" and even "Web" and " 'Net " if I use
        those. "Web site" is two words. There's no hyphen in "email."

        A common one for some of my clients is the distinction of "online,"
        meaning on the Internet, versus "on-line" - meaning available and
        operational, or the opposite of off-line. Ordinarily I'd prefer no
        hyphen in "offline" but I find that it's logical if I'm using both
        terms, such as "servers can be on- or off-line."

        There are a couple of acronyms that are a mix of upper- and lower-case
        letters, and that's odd. "VoIP" is one of them (voice over Internet
        protocol) and that spawned "SoIP" (storage over IP). The initial i in
        "iSCSI" is not capitalized, even if it starts a sentence. Then there's
        unofficial but widely used versions of longer terms, such as "GigE"
        for "Gigabit Ethernet."

        As far as abbreviations and acronyms, it often depends on the audience
        for the particular press release or whatnot. Some terms are so common
        among the 150-200 editors and analysts we work with that it's
        pointless and irritating (maybe even insulting) to spell something
        out. So I don't bother writing out "Network-Attached Storage" even
        once in a document, even though it would be stylistically proper; I
        say "NAS" every time. In the Internet arena, I assume nobody bothers
        to spell out "Hypertext Markup Language" any more either. But a term
        that isn't widely used and understood among our crowd would justify
        it: "Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act" - i.e. HIPAA.

        Speeds and feeds are sometimes a matter of debate. When I mention
        capacity, I always spell out "megabytes," "terabytes," etc. on first
        reference, and abbreviate it thereafter (MB, TB). I don't use an 's'
        with the abbreviation and I make sure there's a space between the
        number and the abbreviation: "10 TB," not "10TB" or "10 TBs." For
        performance, I also spell out "megabytes per second" and abbreviate
        thereafter to "MB/sec."

        I've droned on long enough, so I'll close by saying I write for about
        12 different tech companies, and they do have some individual
        preferences and quirks, e-mail versus email has been one of them. I'm
        happy to say the hyphen does seem to be going away at this point!

        Cheers,
        Kezia

        --- In prbytes@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Driehorst" <miked918@...> wrote:
        >
        > I'm putting together an Internet term styleguide for my company, and
        > am curious as to what you typically use.
        >
        > Such as do you capitalize Internet? (Wired magazine doesn't.)
        >
        > What about e-mail v E-mail v email?
        >
        > What are some of the more common terms you use, and why do you use
        > them that way?
        >
        > I'm mostly using Dictionary.com for sources. Also looking at
        > Webopedia.com. Any other good, credible sources?
        >
        > Mike
        >
        > Mike Driehorst
        > Messaging Strategist
        >
        > H A N S O N I N C .
        > Maumee, Ohio 43537
        >
      • kezia_jauron
        ... As in e-tail, e-photo (though i-photo was big for a minute) ... ...because it usually is just a corporate ego branding thing, and doesn t aid
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 2, 2007
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          I agree with Rich on these:

          > - intranet
          > - e-anything else

          As in e-tail, e-photo (though i-photo was big for a minute)

          I disagree on this:

          > - internal caps on URLs, where it will make them better-understood:
          > Rich@..., Rich@..., eWorldWire.com

          ...because it usually is just a corporate ego branding thing, and
          doesn't aid understanding. On this I tend to lose to client preference.

          And I agree that AP Style, if applicable, takes precedence.
        • David P. Dillard
          First of all, I would like to complement Kezia Jauron on an informative, useful and well written post, my tip of the hat on this effort. Perhaps tangential,
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 2, 2007
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            First of all, I would like to complement Kezia Jauron on an informative,
            useful and well written post, my tip of the hat on this effort.

            Perhaps tangential, but important as more and more of the sources we refer
            to are electronic is the issue of citing and identifying online sources of
            a variety of kinds. These Net-Gold posts point to sources that assist
            with these kinds of sources in terms of describing and citing them.


            WRITING AND WRITERS: CITATION FORMAT: FOOTNOTES ENDNOTES BIBLIOGRAPHY :
            WRITING AND WRITERS CITATION FORMAT ONLINE ELECTRONIC INTERNET DATABASE:
            Resources for Documenting Electronic Sources
            <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Net-Gold/message/15662>


            WRITING AND WRITERS: CITATION FORMAT: FOOTNOTES ENDNOTES BIBLIOGRAPHY :
            WRITING AND WRITERS CITATION FORMAT ONLINE ELECTRONIC INTERNET DATABASE:
            Citation Styles Online
            <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Net-Gold/message/15661>


            WRITING AND WRITERS: STYLE AND WRITING MANUALS:
            Citing Internet And Print Resources
            <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Net-Gold/message/15269>


            WRITING AND WRITERS; STYLE AND WRITING MANUALS; Using American
            Psychological Association (APA) Format
            <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Net-Gold/message/9705>
            <http://www.apastyle.org/elecref.html>


            LAW : LEGAL CITATIONS STYLE MANUALS : WRITING AND WRITERS: STYLE AND
            WRITING MANUALS: Handbooks and Guides to Legal Citation Format and
            Techniques: A Selection of Sources on the Internet and in Print
            <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Net-Gold/message/9261>


            EDUCATION: RESOURCES : INTERNET: RESOURCES : REFERENCE: RESOURCES: Key
            Reference and Internet Guides in Net-Gold
            <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Net-Gold/message/7792>


            REFERENCE: TOOLS: HANDBOOKS: General Handbooks and Websites on the
            Internet Providing Facts and Information: A Selection of Resources
            <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Net-Gold/message/7706>


            WRITING AND WRITERS: RHETORIC AND SKILLS :
            WRITING AND WRITERS: STYLE AND WRITING MANUALS:
            Helping Your Students to Do the Write Thing
            <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Net-Gold/message/3129>


            This post may also be of interest to the information seekers on this
            discussion group.


            REFERENCE: ENCYCLOPEDIAS :
            REFERENCE: ONLINE REFERENCE SOURCES AND TOOLS :
            WIKIS:
            Look Who's Using Wikipedia
            <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Net-Gold/message/17254>


            These sources may also be of interest in regard to rhetoric in the
            electronic environments.


            Reinventing Rhetoric: The Classical Canon in the Computer Age
            <http://www.cas.usf.edu/english/walker/papers/rhetoric.html>


            The Composition Links
            <http://www.cod.edu/academic/acadprog/tranprog/engl_com/composit.htm>


            Basics: A Rhetoric and Handbook
            <http://www.mhhe.com/socscience/english/basics/chapterlinks.htm>



            Sincerely,
            David Dillard
            Temple University
            (215) 204 - 4584
            jwne@...
            Net-Gold
            <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/net-gold>
            <http://listserv.temple.edu/archives/net-gold.html>
            <http://groups.google.com/group/net-gold?hl=en>
            <http://net-gold.mailspaces.com/>
            General Internet & Print Resources
            <http://library.temple.edu/articles/subject_guides/general.jsp>
            <http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/ringleaders/davidd.html>
            Digital Divide Network
            <http://www.digitaldivide.net/profile/jwne>
            Educator-Gold
            <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Educator-Gold/>
            K12ADMINLIFE
            <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/K12AdminLIFE/>


            =========================================


            On Wed, 28 Feb 2007, kezia_jauron wrote:

            > "Wired Style" (there's an actual book) was the bible back in the day -
            > meaning 10 years ago or so - but I find a lot of it outdated now.

            > I still capitalize "Internet" and even "Web" and " 'Net " if I use
            > those. "Web site" is two words. There's no hyphen in "email."

            > A common one for some of my clients is the distinction of "online,"
            > meaning on the Internet, versus "on-line" - meaning available and
            > operational, or the opposite of off-line. Ordinarily I'd prefer no
            > hyphen in "offline" but I find that it's logical if I'm using both
            > terms, such as "servers can be on- or off-line."

            > There are a couple of acronyms that are a mix of upper- and lower-case
            > letters, and that's odd. "VoIP" is one of them (voice over Internet
            > protocol) and that spawned "SoIP" (storage over IP). The initial i in
            > "iSCSI" is not capitalized, even if it starts a sentence. Then there's
            > unofficial but widely used versions of longer terms, such as "GigE"
            > for "Gigabit Ethernet."

            > As far as abbreviations and acronyms, it often depends on the audience
            > for the particular press release or whatnot. Some terms are so common
            > among the 150-200 editors and analysts we work with that it's
            > pointless and irritating (maybe even insulting) to spell something
            > out. So I don't bother writing out "Network-Attached Storage" even
            > once in a document, even though it would be stylistically proper; I
            > say "NAS" every time. In the Internet arena, I assume nobody bothers
            > to spell out "Hypertext Markup Language" any more either. But a term
            > that isn't widely used and understood among our crowd would justify
            > it: "Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act" - i.e. HIPAA.

            > Speeds and feeds are sometimes a matter of debate. When I mention
            > capacity, I always spell out "megabytes," "terabytes," etc. on first
            > reference, and abbreviate it thereafter (MB, TB). I don't use an 's'
            > with the abbreviation and I make sure there's a space between the
            > number and the abbreviation: "10 TB," not "10TB" or "10 TBs." For
            > performance, I also spell out "megabytes per second" and abbreviate
            > thereafter to "MB/sec."

            > I've droned on long enough, so I'll close by saying I write for about
            > 12 different tech companies, and they do have some individual
            > preferences and quirks, e-mail versus email has been one of them. I'm
            > happy to say the hyphen does seem to be going away at this point!

            > Cheers,
            > Kezia

            > --- In prbytes@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Driehorst" <miked918@...> wrote:

            > > I'm putting together an Internet term styleguide for my company, and
            > > am curious as to what you typically use.

            > > Such as do you capitalize Internet? (Wired magazine doesn't.)
            > > What about e-mail v E-mail v email?
            > > What are some of the more common terms you use, and why do you use
            > > them that way?
            > > I'm mostly using Dictionary.com for sources. Also looking at
            > > Webopedia.com. Any other good, credible sources?

            > > Mike

            > > Mike Driehorst
            > > Messaging Strategist

            > > H A N S O N I N C .
            > > Maumee, Ohio 43537
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