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Press conference -- dead or alive?

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  • djsmith16
    I m in a new position and a new city. Although I ve worked in PR for a number of years, it s been a while since I ve done much media work. The agency I m
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 20, 2006
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      I'm in a new position and a new city. Although I've worked in PR for a
      number of years, it's been a while since I've done much media work.
      The agency I'm working with is wanting to schedule a press conference
      to announce a new inititive. I'm wondering if that is still a viable
      option for attracting coverage, especially in a mid-size metro market.
      Obviously, I know the president does it as do police, etc., but what
      about other agencies and for something that isn't already on the radar
      screen?

      Anyone had experience with this and how has it worked?
    • Ned Barnett
      Press releases are viable when you have theater to go with it - the unveiling of a long-awaited new product, the announcement (with subsequent Q&A) of a new
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 4, 2006
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        Press releases are viable when you have "theater" to go with it - the
        unveiling of a long-awaited new product, the announcement (with
        subsequent Q&A) of a new executive or official, etc.

        However, for run-of-the-mill announcements, fuggidabowtit (at least
        in my opinion)

        Ned

        At 12:38 PM 4/4/2006, you wrote:
        >I'm in a new position and a new city. Although I've worked in PR for a
        >number of years, it's been a while since I've done much media work.
        >The agency I'm working with is wanting to schedule a press conference
        >to announce a new inititive. I'm wondering if that is still a viable
        >option for attracting coverage, especially in a mid-size metro market.
        >Obviously, I know the president does it as do police, etc., but what
        >about other agencies and for something that isn't already on the radar
        >screen?
        >
        >Anyone had experience with this and how has it worked?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >



        Ned Barnett, APR
        Marketing/PR Fellow, AHA

        Barnett Marketing Communications
        Exceptional Marcom Services for Exceptional Clients

        420 N. Nellis Blvd., A3 - 276 - Las Vegas, NV 89110
        Phone: 702-696-1200 * FAX: 702-696-1211
        ned@... - http://www.barnettmarcom.com

        Barnett on PR: http://barnettmarcom.blogspot.com/
        Barnett on Marketing: http://barnettonmarketing.blogspot.com/
        Barnett on Book Promotion/Marketing/Publishing:
        http://barnettonpublishing.blogspot.com/

        BMC - A Sound Investment in Exceptional Success

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Mike Driehorst
        Generally, yes, news conferences to have a place. Personally, I d only do a news conference if there is big enough news. Usually, I d prefer one-on-one editor
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 5, 2006
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          Generally, yes, news conferences to have a place. Personally, I'd only
          do a news conference if there is big enough news.

          Usually, I'd prefer one-on-one editor interviews. That way each can
          feel they are getting "exclusive" treatment, and personal attention.
          However, those can be difficult to schedule in a single day if you are
          looking for one big announcement.

          Mike
          _____________________________
          Michael Driehorst
          Media Relations Manager
          The Lauerer Markin Group Inc.
          Maumee, OH 43537 U.S.A.
          +419.887-6811 (direct)
          +1.800.535.3212 (ext. 396)
          miked@...
          AIM: mcdriehorst / Y!M: miked918

          --- In prbytes@yahoogroups.com, "djsmith16" <dmoseley@...> wrote:
          >
          > I'm in a new position and a new city. Although I've worked in PR for a
          > number of years, it's been a while since I've done much media work.
          > The agency I'm working with is wanting to schedule a press conference
          > to announce a new inititive. I'm wondering if that is still a viable
          > option for attracting coverage, especially in a mid-size metro market.
          > Obviously, I know the president does it as do police, etc., but what
          > about other agencies and for something that isn't already on the radar
          > screen?
          >
          > Anyone had experience with this and how has it worked?
          >
        • kezia_jauron
          There s not much information here to go on, such as what type of announcement it is, so it s hard for me to answer. In general I think a press conference is
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 5, 2006
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            There's not much information here to go on, such as what type of
            announcement it is, so it's hard for me to answer. In general I think a
            press conference is called for only for really time-sensitive, really
            big news.

            Still, a press conference shouldn't replace one-on-one briefings with
            key journalists. Be aware it will do nothing to build relationships, in
            fact the opposite may even be true. You run the risk of
            communicating 'you aren't important enough for us to give you this
            story personally.'

            It can also backfire if journalists see all their competition in one
            room. They may figure that if everyone else is already covering this
            story, why should I bother?

            If it has to be done this way, in addition to prebriefing your best
            targets, I assume you will want to call people to invite them. If it's
            urgent enough to hold a press conference, then it's urgent enough to
            make phone calls - and send all the who/what/wheres by email afterward
            (as in minutes afterward). With these calls and emails, I would try to
            give as much information up front as possible. They should practically
            have the story written by the time they walk in the door. Still, your
            top reporters should have access to information or sources that you
            don't give everyone so they still believe you like them best.

            And to smooth the feathers of journalists who are still annoyed that
            you made them leave their desks for _this_, have a nice spread of food.
            Hummus and baba ghannouj with pita bread triangles and fancy olives
            works almost any time of day for almost everyone's wacky diet.



            --- In prbytes@yahoogroups.com, "djsmith16" <dmoseley@...> wrote:
            >
            > I'm in a new position and a new city. Although I've worked in PR for
            a
            > number of years, it's been a while since I've done much media work.
            > The agency I'm working with is wanting to schedule a press conference
            > to announce a new inititive. I'm wondering if that is still a viable
            > option for attracting coverage, especially in a mid-size metro
            market.
            > Obviously, I know the president does it as do police, etc., but what
            > about other agencies and for something that isn't already on the
            radar
            > screen?
            >
            > Anyone had experience with this and how has it worked?
            >
          • alvin.hattal
            These days--and for a long time now--news conferences are appropriate only if no other vehicle will do the job. Reporters have enough to do and have long been
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 5, 2006
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              These days--and for a long time now--news conferences are appropriate only
              if no other vehicle will do the job. Reporters have enough to do and have
              long been fed up with their overuse and disappointing reasons. Best not to
              irritate them by summoning them with unnecessary ones.

              Alvin Hattal
              al@...
              www.hattal.com
              V: 425-576-1950



              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "djsmith16" <dmoseley@...>
              To: <prbytes@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Monday, March 20, 2006 8:59 AM
              Subject: [prbytes] Press conference -- dead or alive?


              > I'm in a new position and a new city. Although I've worked in PR for a
              > number of years, it's been a while since I've done much media work.
              > The agency I'm working with is wanting to schedule a press conference
              > to announce a new inititive. I'm wondering if that is still a viable
              > option for attracting coverage, especially in a mid-size metro market.
              > Obviously, I know the president does it as do police, etc., but what
              > about other agencies and for something that isn't already on the radar
              > screen?
              >
              > Anyone had experience with this and how has it worked?
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • Duncan
              I agree with Alvin that we have to be careful about calling news conferences these days. But it really does depend on whether your announcement is important
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 6, 2006
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                I agree with Alvin that we have to be careful about calling news conferences
                these days. But it really does depend on whether your announcement is
                important enough. You didn't mention what this initiative is. If it's
                something that's going to create what would relatively be a large number of
                jobs, it very well could be worth a news conference. But as a rule CEOs and
                other clients are notorious for thinking the media will find their news as
                interesting as they themselves do. It's a subjective thing though, so if you
                aren't sure, this is where time building good relationships with the media
                pays off. Contact a reporter or two you have good rapport with and simply
                ask. Say, "Look, you understand the media better than I do, so I need some
                advice - Is this worth a news conference?" They'll be flattered you asked,
                and will give you an honest answer.

                Duncan

                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: prbytes@yahoogroups.com [mailto:prbytes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                > Of alvin.hattal
                > Sent: Wednesday, April 05, 2006 10:08 PM
                > To: prbytes@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [prbytes] Press conference -- dead or alive?
                >
                > These days--and for a long time now--news conferences are appropriate only
                > if no other vehicle will do the job. Reporters have enough to do and have
                > long been fed up with their overuse and disappointing reasons. Best not to
                > irritate them by summoning them with unnecessary ones.
                >
                > Alvin Hattal
                > al@...
                > www.hattal.com
                > V: 425-576-1950
                >
                >
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: "djsmith16" <dmoseley@...>
                > To: <prbytes@yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Monday, March 20, 2006 8:59 AM
                > Subject: [prbytes] Press conference -- dead or alive?
                >
                >
                > > I'm in a new position and a new city. Although I've worked in PR for a
                > > number of years, it's been a while since I've done much media work.
                > > The agency I'm working with is wanting to schedule a press conference
                > > to announce a new inititive. I'm wondering if that is still a viable
                > > option for attracting coverage, especially in a mid-size metro market.
                > > Obviously, I know the president does it as do police, etc., but what
                > > about other agencies and for something that isn't already on the radar
                > > screen?
                > >
                > > Anyone had experience with this and how has it worked?
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
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