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Limited a limiting name?

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  • Ned Barnett
    Does anybody here share (or disagree) with my thought that Limited in a company or brand name is somehow limiting (in connotation, not denotation)? I have
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 31, 2005
      Does anybody here share (or disagree) with my thought that "Limited" in a
      company or brand name is somehow "limiting" (in connotation, not denotation)?

      I have a proto-client who wants to brand a service "Limited" and I'm
      telling him I think that will play well in the US (he's from Canada, where
      IMO "Limited" is far more common, and with a far lower level of "negative"
      connotation). We can't agree, so I'm looking to be validated or set straight.

      Any insights?

      Ned



      Ned Barnett, APR
      Marketing/PR Fellow, AHA

      Barnett Marketing Communications
      Exceptional Marcom Services for Exceptional Clients

      420 N. Nellis Blvd., A3 - 276 - Las Vegas, NV 89110
      Phone: 702-696-1200 * FAX: 702-696-1211
      ned@... - http://www.barnettmarcom.com

      Barnett on PR: http://barnettmarcom.blogspot.com/
      Barnett on Marketing: http://barnettonmarketing.blogspot.com/
      Barnett on Book Promotion/Marketing/Publishing:
      http://barnettonpublishing.blogspot.com/

      BMC - A Sound Investment in Exceptional Success

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Shediac Communications Ltd
      Dear Ned, et al: The word Limited is used in Asia, the Commonwealth and in most countries outside of North America (albeit I ve noted many Canadians firms
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 2, 2006
        Dear Ned, et al:

        The word "Limited" is used in Asia, the Commonwealth and in most
        countries outside of North America (albeit I've noted many Canadians
        firms also use "Limited" or "Ltd" rather than "Inc"). In some ways,
        the word opens avenues to creativity. For example, I named an
        associate company of mine (a modeling agency) Models (Un) Limited.

        --- Original Message ---

        From: "Ned Barnett" <ned@...>
        To:
        <PRMindshare@yahoogroups.com> <prquorum@yahoogroups.com> <prbytes@ya
        hoogroups.com>
        Cc:
        Sent: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 14:03:21 -0800
        Subject: [prbytes] Limited a limiting name?

        Does anybody here share (or disagree) with my thought that
        "Limited" in a company or brand name is somehow "limiting" (in
        connotation, not denotation)?

        I have a proto-client who wants to brand a service "Limited" and
        I'm telling him I think that will play well in the US (he's from
        Canada, where IMO "Limited" is far more common, and with a far
        lower level of "negative" connotation). We can't agree, so I'm
        looking to be validated or set straight.

        Any insights?

        Ned Barnett, APR
        Marketing/PR Fellow, AHA
      • Shediac Communications Ltd
        Dear Ned, et al: The word Limited is used throughout Asia, current and past Commonwealth countries, the Middle East and in most other countries outside of
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 2, 2006
          Dear Ned, et al:

          The word "Limited" is used throughout Asia, current and past
          Commonwealth countries, the Middle East and in most other countries
          outside of North America (albeit I've noted many Canadians firms
          also use "Limited" or "Ltd" rather than "Inc").

          In some ways, the word opens avenues to creativity. For example, I
          named an associate company of mine (a modeling agency) Models (Un)
          Limited.

          Frank Mark Shediac
          Hong Kong Goodwill Ambassador (1999-2006)
          CEO, Shediac Communications Ltd--Founded in Hong Kong June 1976
          Cell: (852) 6056 6271
          mailto:fshediac@...


          --- Original Message ---

          From: "Ned Barnett" <ned@...>
          To:
          <PRMindshare@yahoogroups.com> <prquorum@yahoogroups.com> <prbytes@ya
          hoogroups.com>
          Cc:
          Sent: Sat, 31 Dec 2005 14:03:21 -0800
          Subject: [prbytes] Limited a limiting name?

          Does anybody here share (or disagree) with my thought that
          "Limited" in a company or brand name is somehow "limiting" (in
          connotation, not denotation)?

          I have a proto-client who wants to brand a service "Limited" and
          I'm telling him I think that will play well in the US (he's from
          Canada, where IMO "Limited" is far more common, and with a far
          lower level of "negative" connotation). We can't agree, so I'm
          looking to be validated or set straight.

          Any insights?

          Ned Barnett, APR
          Marketing/PR Fellow, AHA
        • kezia_jauron
          For what it s worth, I agree with you, Ned. The implication is that the company is immature or fly-by-night. If a client is an Ltd. (really an LLC or LLP,
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 4, 2006
            For what it's worth, I agree with you, Ned. The implication is that
            the company is immature or fly-by-night.

            If a client is an Ltd. (really an LLC or LLP, generally) versus a
            Corp. or Inc., I advise them to drop the term from their press
            materials unless there's a legality involved.

            But Brits and wannabe Brits don't always share that opinion - for
            this I blame Johnny Lydon and his apres-Pistols band Public Image
            Ltd.




            --- In prbytes@yahoogroups.com, Ned Barnett <ned@b...> wrote:
            >
            > Does anybody here share (or disagree) with my thought
            that "Limited" in a
            > company or brand name is somehow "limiting" (in connotation, not
            denotation)?
            >
            > I have a proto-client who wants to brand a service "Limited" and
            I'm
            > telling him I think that will play well in the US (he's from
            Canada, where
            > IMO "Limited" is far more common, and with a far lower level
            of "negative"
            > connotation). We can't agree, so I'm looking to be validated or
            set straight.
            >
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