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FUND RAISING PHILANTHROPY: Targeting Target For the Salvation of Salvation

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  • David P. Dillard
    FUND RAISING PHILANTHROPY: Targeting Target For the Salvation of Salvation Thursday, November 25, 2004 Target bans Salvation Army bells Angry Seattle customer
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 28, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      FUND RAISING PHILANTHROPY: Targeting Target For the Salvation of Salvation

      Thursday, November 25, 2004
      Target bans Salvation Army bells
      Angry Seattle customer tries to organize boycott of national retailer
      By JOHN IWASAKI
      SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTER
      <http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/201103_salvation25.html>

      The store with the red bull's-eye won't have red kettles outside its doors
      this holiday season.

      Target stores no longer allow Salvation Army bell ringers to solicit for
      charity, a decision that prompted a Seattle customer to send an e-mail to
      more than 100 acquaintances yesterday, urging a boycott of the national
      retailer.

      The Salvation Army raised nearly $200,000 outside Target stores in
      Washington during the 2003 holiday season, more than at any other venue.
      Nationally, the bell ringers collected about $9 million at Target.

      "The Salvation Army is a wonderful organization that helps millions of
      people annually," said Nathan Kaiser, who started the e-mail campaign. "I
      hope that my decision and others will drive Target to reconsider."

      The Minneapolis-based chain, which has 31 stores in Washington, allowed
      the bell ringers for more than 10 years. Target made the Salvation Army
      the exception to its no-solicitation policy because the red kettle drive
      occurred only during the holidays.

      But in January, Target informed the Christian organization that it would
      no longer permit the bell ringers.

      "We have had an increasing number of solicitation inquiries from
      non-profit and other groups," said Paula Greear, a corporate spokeswoman.
      "To be fair and consistent across the board, we're making the
      no-solicitation policy firm."

      <snip>

      The money helps poor people and families, providing meals and groceries,
      helping with utility bills and buying toys for youths at Christmas.

      The organization served 105,000 people in the state during last year's
      holiday season, said Jena Hubbard, spokeswoman for the organization's
      Northwest Division, which includes Washington.

      ----------------------------------------

      Target bans Salvation Army ringers
      Agency could lose a chunk of change
      By Patrick Howington
      phowington@...
      The Courier-Journal
      <http://www.courier-journal.com/business/
      news2004/11/26/D1-salvation26-5158.html>

      A shorter URL for the above link:

      <http://snipurl.com/axsf>

      Dillon West, 11, doesn't understand why Target Corp. won't let the
      Salvation Army place bell ringers outside its stores this Christmas.

      "I don't see why they're not doing that, because it's really not taking
      away any of (their) business," the Fern Creek sixth-grader and Boy Scout
      said in an interview. He also wrote a letter to The Courier-Journal.

      The Salvation Army needs the money to provide food and shelter for people,
      said Dillon, whose Sunday School class sometimes goes to downtown
      Louisville to serve food to the homeless.

      The Salvation Army probably couldn't find a better spokesman for its
      position, but it will have to do without the money Target shoppers usually
      drop in its kettles. And that's a lot of change.

      Collections from four Louisville Target stores last year totaled about
      $70,000 about one-fourth of all kettle donations in the Louisville area.

      "So we're looking at a pretty significant loss without those stores," said
      Lt. Col. Charles White. He is the Salvation Army's divisional commander
      for Kentucky and Tennessee, whose office is in Louisville.

      ----------------------------------------

      Posted on Sun, Nov. 28, 2004
      BELLS ARE THE SOUND OF HIS LIFE'S WORK
      Rock Hill man became Salvation Army officer in '51, and he still rings
      ASHLEY BARRON
      Staff Writer
      <http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/news/local/
      states/south_carolina/counties/york/10287552.htm?1c>

      A shorter URL for the above link:

      <http://snipurl.com/axsh>

      Hearing the Salvation Army bells ringing means different things to
      different people. For many, the bells signal the start of the holiday
      season, not the one that begins in the malls before Halloween. For some,
      they're an opportunity to share from their own blessings.

      For Maj. Robert Butler of Rock Hill, the bells have meant his livelihood
      for more than 50 years.

      "Each corps unit has to be self-supporting, and support divisional and
      territorial headquarters. At different times in the past, you weren't
      guaranteed an allowance," said Butler, 81, who began working for the
      Salvation Army after completing two-year officer training school in
      Atlanta in 1951. "We did weekly solicitation, not just at Christmas time,
      because we couldn't generate enough income. It was pretty hard. The
      country was just leveling off at that time."

      Butler's wife, Genevieve, also holds the rank of major. Before retiring in
      1988, the couple worked as a unit, leading Sunday worship service, raising
      money and evangelizing. He was in charge of the local corps when they
      moved to Rock Hill in 1980.

      "I had my first contact with the Salvation Army back in 1948," Butler
      said. "My brother was a Salvation Army officer before me.

      "I started bell-ringing when I was in school in 1950. As cadets, we had to
      get out at Christmas. I started then and never stopped."

      He still volunteers. Friday, he was ringing the bell at Kmart.

      ----------------------------------------

      Salvation Army Predicts $9 Million Less Collected
      Website Mentioned On NewsChannel 15
      <http://www.wane.com/Global/story.asp?S=2619764&nav=0RYbTaNE>

      (California-Matt McCutcheon-November 27, 2004) The Salvation Army says
      theyll see 9 million dollars less this holiday season.

      The not-for-profit Christian organization says a recent bell-ringer ban
      will make for less money collected during their annual kettle drive.

      Target stores nationwide banned the bell ringers from soliciting on their
      property.

      ----------------------------------------

      Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2004
      Protests Ring Out After Target Bans Salvation Army

      Some consumers and advocacy groups are upset that retailers including
      Target have banned the Salvation Army's Christmas tradition of
      bell-ringing volunteers who solicit donations for the poor.

      The bans have touched off controversy among retailers. Some top sellers
      seem to be catering to the charity to win over consumers ticked off at
      other stores for kicking the bell-ringers off their property.

      "The Salvation Army has a remarkable history of providing year-round
      service to families, and Big Lots is proud to continue our tradition of
      helping with their fundraising goals," this Columbus, Ohio, retailer said
      in a statement after Target's announcement it would ban the charity.

      They were followed by auto parts chain AutoZone and the nation's No. 3
      bookseller chain, Books-A-Million Inc., the Boston Globe reported. BJ's
      Wholesale Club Inc. has also stepped in to help by allowing the kettles at
      its stores.

      The nation's No. 1 retailer, Wal-Mart, has also welcomed the bell-ringers,
      but with restrictions: They must stand outside stores and are limited to
      14 days, the Globe said.

      The bans by Target, Best Buy, Home Depot and others come amid the
      Salvation Army's 113th year of doing what it can to fend for the poor and
      unfortunate.

      Shoppers "are coming here for a reason, and the reason is not for
      solicitation of any kind by a third party," said Steve Mullen, a spokesman
      for Circuit City.

      However, that chain of consumer electronics and appliance stores
      apparently did an about-face. The Salvation Army said in a statement that
      "its prayers have been answered by Circuit City, Michaels and
      Books-A-Million. Wal-Mart and Kmart will still allow the Salvation Army
      outside their stores this year."

      Target's decision "was a huge shock and a huge source of discouragement
      for us," Lt. David Grindle, a spokesman for the charity, told Fox News
      Channel.

      <snip>

      It's unclear whether the kettle-kicking retailers dislike the Salvation
      Army or are merely acting out of concern for customers. What is clear is
      that not all customers like their decisions.

      "It's a disgrace," South Boston resident Phyllis McElaney told the Globe.
      "The bell ringers remind you of the meaning of Christmas, that it's about
      love, caring, and giving."

      "Call it a safe bet - maybe even a bright-red, bull's-eye, fashionable,
      smartly priced bet - that American life has become too corporate or
      complex when Target banishes the Salvation Army's bell ringers,"
      Indianapolis Star columnist Ruth Holladay wrote.

      ----------------------------------------

      Letter: Target Grinches Salvation Army
      Thursday, November 18, 2004
      Melrose Free Press
      <http://www2.townonline.com/melrose/opinion/view.bg?articleid=128353>

      Upon hearing the news that the Target stores are banning the appearance of
      the Salvation Army outside their stores this Christmas season, I was even
      more convinced of the strong effort to eradicate any form of seeing or
      thinking off what is of God during the Christmas season. And that the war
      against God is in the fast lane. The move akin to that of the board of our
      own Senior Center.

      I spoke with an authority at Target's headquarters for an explanation
      of this move on their part and I was told they don't want any
      "solicitation" taking place. Consequently, I was not impressed. One
      wonders what mentality some of these decision makers feel they are talking
      to, when asked for an explanation for the reason of their move.

      The Salvation Army does not go through the stores approaching
      customers or employees verbally asking for a donation. The Salvation Army
      does not approach passers-by on any ground they occupy. They simply ring a
      bell as a reminder and serve as a representation of what the Christmas
      season is all about: Love, giving to the poor and not forgetting the less
      fortunate. For years they have made their welcomed presence to all of us
      publicly. For years we have enjoyed seeing them and being reminded of a
      special generous heart at work. They have never been faulted for creating
      a disturbance or unlawful solicitation. And for a Target representative
      try to give "solicitation" as a so-called "explanation" for this move, to
      any thinking person, is nothing but a "lame excuse" for joining the war
      against God and/or religion going on in this country.

      ----------------------------------------

      Target bans Salvation Army bell ringers
      Updated: 11/12/2004 5:46 PM
      By: Bridget Blythe
      <http://www.capitalnews9.com/content/
      your_news/capital_region/default.asp?ArID=103988>

      A shorter URL for the above link:

      <http://snipurl.com/axsq>

      ----------------------------------------

      CHARITY
      Targets Salvation Army Ban Unpopular with Some Shoppers
      By Wendy Griffith
      CBN News Sr. Reporter
      <http://www.cbn.com/CBNNews/News/041119a.asp>

      For many, the Salvation Army bell-ringers are simply a part of the
      Christmas season. Last year, the Army's red kettle campaign raised about
      90 million dollars nationwide to help the poor. Target stores helped raise
      nine million of that or 10 percent, by allowing the bell ringers to stand
      outside its entrances.

      The sidewalks outside Target stores will be a little quieter this year. No
      bells ringing, no Merry Christmas or God bless you. No, this year, Target
      is banning the Salvation Army bell-ringers from all of its more than 1,300
      stores nationwide.

      Target's decision is pretty unpopular with some shoppers.

      Shopper Jeffrey Trimm said, "I thought it was wrong because the Salvation
      Army is a good cause. They take care of lots of people. I won't be
      supporting Target this year."

      Another shopper, Barbara Whitmore, asked, "What's Christmas without the
      bell-ringers?"

      There is even a Web site called BanTarget.org, urging people to ban their
      wallets from Targets cash registers for banning the bell-ringers.

      ----------------------------------------

      Posted on Thu, Nov. 11, 2004
      Target silences Salvation Army bells
      KARLA D. SHORES
      Knight Ridder Tribune Business News
      <http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/business/10150324.htm>

      Target held out for several years, allowing only The Salvation Army to
      collect donations in front of its stores despite the company's
      no-solicitation policy. But this Christmas, the No. 2 U.S. discount
      retailer will no longer allow the once ubiquitous Salvation Army bell
      ringers just outside its automatic doors. The company is closing its 1,313
      stores to the 139-year-old nonprofit Christian organization.

      ----------------------------------------

      CULTURE DIGEST: Target stores reject Salvation Army kettles; Spiritual
      collegians have better emotional health; More teens having plastic
      surgery; Study: Ramadan practices changing
      Nov 4, 2004
      By Erin Curry
      BP News
      <http://www.sbcbaptistpress.org/bpnews.asp?ID=19479>

      NASHVILLE, Tenn. (BP)--The Salvation Army could lose nearly $10 million in
      donations this Christmas season after Target stores nationwide decided not
      to allow the annual fundraiser on their property.

      ----------------------------------------

      Salvation Army Looks To Small Businesses
      Nov 27, 2004 5:13 pm US/Central
      WCCO.com
      <http://wcco.com/localnews/local_story_332181716.html>

      Rochester, Minn. (AP) Salvation Army bellringers in Rochester are looking
      to small, local businesses this holiday season after being shut out of
      Target stores.

      <snip>

      Some of the businesses are allowing the bellringers and their countertop
      kettles at the establishments. Others are making donations to the
      Salvation Army with the sale of specific products.

      ----------------------------------------

      News
      Salvation Army bells ring again
      The Daily Reflector
      <http://www.reflector.com/news/newsfd/auto/feed/news/
      2004/11/26/1101531408.18121.7652.0846.html;
      COXnetJSessionID=Bpk1gfCgc9O9MmJdAb1nVV6UzRAACY4gLNbKSdvMUvxKSa2BX19H!-
      806845150?urac=n&urvf=11016531096990.929108359686523>

      A shorter URL for the above link:

      <http://snipurl.com/axsz>

      Although the Salvation Army will no longer have bell ringers at Target due
      to the retailer's enforcement of its no solicitation policy, the group
      found a new location at K & W Cafeteria at the Carolina East Mall. Other
      locations include Belk, Proffitt's, J.C. Penney, Kmart and Wal-Mart.

      At the kick-off for the kettle campaign, a representative from Krispy
      Kreme Doughnuts handed out coupons to all contributors for one free glazed
      doughnut. The coupons will be available every Saturday of the campaign
      through Dec. 18.

      "We want to encourage donations to the Salvation Army Bell Ringers
      Campaign this holiday season," Amanda Tilley said, market manager of
      Krispy Kreme. "Giving a coupon for a free doughnut is Krispy Kreme's way
      of thanking the community for supporting our local Salvation Army
      chapters."

      Along with the bell ringing, the Salvation Army started its annual Angel
      Tree of local families in need. The Salvation Army has 780 families in
      need of Christmas gifts. Each family has an average of four children per
      household, which is about 3,000 kids.

      ----------------------------------------
      ----------------------------------------

      The complete articles may be read at the URLs provided for each.

      The Salvation Army National Headquarters
      <http://www.salvationarmyusa.org/>

      Target Corporation
      Contact Us
      <http://www.targetcorp.com/targetcorp_group/contactus/contact.jhtml>


      Sincerely,
      David Dillard
      Temple University
      (215) 204 - 4584
      jwne@...
      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/net-gold>
      <http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/ringleaders/davidd.html>
      <http://www.kovacs.com/medref-l/medref-l.html>
      <http://listserv.temple.edu/archives/net-gold.html>
      <http://www.LIFEofFlorida.org>
      World Business Community Advisor
      <http://www.WorldBusinessCommunity.org>
    • Jube
      okay, David, what comments are you adding to this? I think if people give extra money to the Salvation Army, let say . . the money they would have spent at
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 28, 2004
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        okay, David, what comments are you adding to this? I think if people
        give extra money to the Salvation Army, let say . . the money they would
        have spent at Target. . . it would really send a message. I was part
        of the group that helped to take down KMart, and belive me once shoppers
        change stores because of a cause like this, they don't go back. What
        are your reasonings for sending this?

        Blessings,· ´¨¨)) -:¦:-
        ¸.·´ .·´¨¨))
        ((¸¸.·´ .·´ -:¦:-Jube
        -:¦:- ((¸¸.·´*
        http://www.NetMediaConsultants.com
        Practical Public Relations
        On and Off the Net


        David P. Dillard wrote:

        >
        >
        >FUND RAISING PHILANTHROPY: Targeting Target For the Salvation of Salvation
        >
        >Thursday, November 25, 2004
        >Target bans Salvation Army bells
        >Angry Seattle customer tries to organize boycott of national retailer
        >By JOHN IWASAKI
        >SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTER
        ><http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/201103_salvation25.html>
        >
        >The store with the red bull's-eye won't have red kettles outside its doors
        >this holiday season.
        >
        >----------------------------------------
        >
        >The complete articles may be read at the URLs provided for each.
        >
        >The Salvation Army National Headquarters
        ><http://www.salvationarmyusa.org/>
        >
        >Target Corporation
        >Contact Us
        ><http://www.targetcorp.com/targetcorp_group/contactus/contact.jhtml>
        >
        >
        >Sincerely,
        >David Dillard
        >Temple University
        >(215) 204 - 4584
        >jwne@...
        ><http://groups.yahoo.com/group/net-gold>
        ><http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/ringleaders/davidd.html>
        ><http://www.kovacs.com/medref-l/medref-l.html>
        ><http://listserv.temple.edu/archives/net-gold.html>
        ><http://www.LIFEofFlorida.org>
        >World Business Community Advisor
        ><http://www.WorldBusinessCommunity.org>
        >
        >
        >
      • David P. Dillard
        This in my mind is a very interesting example of a public relations issue in regard to which Target has made a strong and in some quarters very unpopular
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 30, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          This in my mind is a very interesting example of a public relations issue
          in regard to which Target has made a strong and in some quarters very
          unpopular decision. By sharing a diversity of press coverage regarding
          this action by Target, one can see a decision and its impact on the
          business with the public, journalists and its customer base. I think that
          corporate actions that have strong implications for public relations are
          important learning laboratories for those who are interested in or
          practice in the area of public relations.


          Sincerely,
          David Dillard
          Temple University
          (215) 204 - 4584
          jwne@...
          <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/net-gold>
          <http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/ringleaders/davidd.html>
          <http://www.kovacs.com/medref-l/medref-l.html>
          <http://listserv.temple.edu/archives/net-gold.html>
          <http://www.LIFEofFlorida.org>
          World Business Community Advisor
          <http://www.WorldBusinessCommunity.org>


          On Sun, 28 Nov 2004, Jube wrote:

          > okay, David, what comments are you adding to this? I think if people
          > give extra money to the Salvation Army, let say . . the money they would
          > have spent at Target. . . it would really send a message. I was part
          > of the group that helped to take down KMart, and belive me once shoppers
          > change stores because of a cause like this, they don't go back. What
          > are your reasonings for sending this?

          > Blessings,· ´¨¨)) -:¦:-
          > ¸.·´ .·´¨¨))
          > ((¸¸.·´ .·´ -:¦:-Jube
          > -:¦:- ((¸¸.·´*
          > http://www.NetMediaConsultants.com
          > Practical Public Relations
          > On and Off the Net

          > David P. Dillard wrote:

          > >FUND RAISING PHILANTHROPY: Targeting Target For the Salvation of Salvation
          > >
          > >Thursday, November 25, 2004
          > >Target bans Salvation Army bells
          > >Angry Seattle customer tries to organize boycott of national retailer
          > >By JOHN IWASAKI
          > >SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTER
          > ><http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/201103_salvation25.html>

          > >The store with the red bull's-eye won't have red kettles outside its doors
          > >this holiday season.

          > >----------------------------------------

          > >The complete articles may be read at the URLs provided for each.

          > >The Salvation Army National Headquarters
          > ><http://www.salvationarmyusa.org/>

          > >Target Corporation
          > >Contact Us
          > ><http://www.targetcorp.com/targetcorp_group/contactus/contact.jhtml>


          > >Sincerely,
          > >David Dillard
          > >Temple University
          > >(215) 204 - 4584
          > >jwne@...
          > ><http://groups.yahoo.com/group/net-gold>
          > ><http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/ringleaders/davidd.html>
          > ><http://www.kovacs.com/medref-l/medref-l.html>
          > ><http://listserv.temple.edu/archives/net-gold.html>
          > ><http://www.LIFEofFlorida.org>
          > >World Business Community Advisor
          > ><http://www.WorldBusinessCommunity.org>
        • Ned Barnett
          Fund-raising for non-profits is a major thrust of my business. Anybody needing specific ideas, please drop me a line. Ned
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 30, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            Fund-raising for non-profits is a major thrust of my business. Anybody
            needing specific ideas, please drop me a line.

            Ned

            At 06:53 AM 11/28/2004, you wrote:



            >FUND RAISING PHILANTHROPY: Targeting Target For the Salvation of Salvation
            >
            >Thursday, November 25, 2004
            >Target bans Salvation Army bells
            >Angry Seattle customer tries to organize boycott of national retailer
            >By JOHN IWASAKI
            >SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER REPORTER
            ><<http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/201103_salvation25.html>http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/201103_salvation25.html>
            >
            >The store with the red bull's-eye won't have red kettles outside its doors
            >this holiday season.
            >
            >Target stores no longer allow Salvation Army bell ringers to solicit for
            >charity, a decision that prompted a Seattle customer to send an e-mail to
            >more than 100 acquaintances yesterday, urging a boycott of the national
            >retailer.
            >
            >The Salvation Army raised nearly $200,000 outside Target stores in
            >Washington during the 2003 holiday season, more than at any other venue.
            >Nationally, the bell ringers collected about $9 million at Target.
            >
            >"The Salvation Army is a wonderful organization that helps millions of
            >people annually," said Nathan Kaiser, who started the e-mail campaign. "I
            >hope that my decision and others will drive Target to reconsider."
            >
            >The Minneapolis-based chain, which has 31 stores in Washington, allowed
            >the bell ringers for more than 10 years. Target made the Salvation Army
            >the exception to its no-solicitation policy because the red kettle drive
            >occurred only during the holidays.
            >
            >But in January, Target informed the Christian organization that it would
            >no longer permit the bell ringers.
            >
            >"We have had an increasing number of solicitation inquiries from
            >non-profit and other groups," said Paula Greear, a corporate spokeswoman.
            >"To be fair and consistent across the board, we're making the
            >no-solicitation policy firm."
            >
            ><snip>
            >
            >The money helps poor people and families, providing meals and groceries,
            >helping with utility bills and buying toys for youths at Christmas.
            >
            >The organization served 105,000 people in the state during last year's
            >holiday season, said Jena Hubbard, spokeswoman for the organization's
            >Northwest Division, which includes Washington.
            >
            >----------------------------------------
            >
            >Target bans Salvation Army ringers
            >Agency could lose a chunk of change
            >By Patrick Howington
            >phowington@...
            >The Courier-Journal
            ><<http://www.courier-journal.com/business/>http://www.courier-journal.com/business/
            >news2004/11/26/D1-salvation26-5158.html>
            >
            >A shorter URL for the above link:
            >
            ><<http://snipurl.com/axsf>http://snipurl.com/axsf>
            >
            >Dillon West, 11, doesn't understand why Target Corp. won't let the
            >Salvation Army place bell ringers outside its stores this Christmas.
            >
            >"I don't see why they're not doing that, because it's really not taking
            >away any of (their) business," the Fern Creek sixth-grader and Boy Scout
            >said in an interview. He also wrote a letter to The Courier-Journal.
            >
            >The Salvation Army needs the money to provide food and shelter for people,
            >said Dillon, whose Sunday School class sometimes goes to downtown
            >Louisville to serve food to the homeless.
            >
            >The Salvation Army probably couldn't find a better spokesman for its
            >position, but it will have to do without the money Target shoppers usually
            >drop in its kettles. And that's a lot of change.
            >
            >Collections from four Louisville Target stores last year totaled about
            >$70,000 about one-fourth of all kettle donations in the Louisville area.
            >
            >"So we're looking at a pretty significant loss without those stores," said
            >Lt. Col. Charles White. He is the Salvation Army's divisional commander
            >for Kentucky and Tennessee, whose office is in Louisville.
            >
            >----------------------------------------
            >
            >Posted on Sun, Nov. 28, 2004
            >BELLS ARE THE SOUND OF HIS LIFE'S WORK
            >Rock Hill man became Salvation Army officer in '51, and he still rings
            >ASHLEY BARRON
            >Staff Writer
            ><<http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/news/local/>http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/news/local/
            >states/south_carolina/counties/york/10287552.htm?1c>
            >
            >A shorter URL for the above link:
            >
            ><<http://snipurl.com/axsh>http://snipurl.com/axsh>
            >
            >Hearing the Salvation Army bells ringing means different things to
            >different people. For many, the bells signal the start of the holiday
            >season, not the one that begins in the malls before Halloween. For some,
            >they're an opportunity to share from their own blessings.
            >
            >For Maj. Robert Butler of Rock Hill, the bells have meant his livelihood
            >for more than 50 years.
            >
            >"Each corps unit has to be self-supporting, and support divisional and
            >territorial headquarters. At different times in the past, you weren't
            >guaranteed an allowance," said Butler, 81, who began working for the
            >Salvation Army after completing two-year officer training school in
            >Atlanta in 1951. "We did weekly solicitation, not just at Christmas time,
            >because we couldn't generate enough income. It was pretty hard. The
            >country was just leveling off at that time."
            >
            >Butler's wife, Genevieve, also holds the rank of major. Before retiring in
            >1988, the couple worked as a unit, leading Sunday worship service, raising
            >money and evangelizing. He was in charge of the local corps when they
            >moved to Rock Hill in 1980.
            >
            >"I had my first contact with the Salvation Army back in 1948," Butler
            >said. "My brother was a Salvation Army officer before me.
            >
            >"I started bell-ringing when I was in school in 1950. As cadets, we had to
            >get out at Christmas. I started then and never stopped."
            >
            >He still volunteers. Friday, he was ringing the bell at Kmart.
            >
            >----------------------------------------
            >
            >Salvation Army Predicts $9 Million Less Collected
            >Website Mentioned On NewsChannel 15
            ><<http://www.wane.com/Global/story.asp?S=2619764&nav=0RYbTaNE>http://www.wane.com/Global/story.asp?S=2619764&nav=0RYbTaNE>
            >
            >(California-Matt McCutcheon-November 27, 2004) The Salvation Army says
            >theyll see 9 million dollars less this holiday season.
            >
            >The not-for-profit Christian organization says a recent bell-ringer ban
            >will make for less money collected during their annual kettle drive.
            >
            >Target stores nationwide banned the bell ringers from soliciting on their
            >property.
            >
            >----------------------------------------
            >
            >Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2004
            >Protests Ring Out After Target Bans Salvation Army
            >
            >Some consumers and advocacy groups are upset that retailers including
            >Target have banned the Salvation Army's Christmas tradition of
            >bell-ringing volunteers who solicit donations for the poor.
            >
            >The bans have touched off controversy among retailers. Some top sellers
            >seem to be catering to the charity to win over consumers ticked off at
            >other stores for kicking the bell-ringers off their property.
            >
            >"The Salvation Army has a remarkable history of providing year-round
            >service to families, and Big Lots is proud to continue our tradition of
            >helping with their fundraising goals," this Columbus, Ohio, retailer said
            >in a statement after Target's announcement it would ban the charity.
            >
            >They were followed by auto parts chain AutoZone and the nation's No. 3
            >bookseller chain, Books-A-Million Inc., the Boston Globe reported. BJ's
            >Wholesale Club Inc. has also stepped in to help by allowing the kettles at
            >its stores.
            >
            >The nation's No. 1 retailer, Wal-Mart, has also welcomed the bell-ringers,
            >but with restrictions: They must stand outside stores and are limited to
            >14 days, the Globe said.
            >
            >The bans by Target, Best Buy, Home Depot and others come amid the
            >Salvation Army's 113th year of doing what it can to fend for the poor and
            >unfortunate.
            >
            >Shoppers "are coming here for a reason, and the reason is not for
            >solicitation of any kind by a third party," said Steve Mullen, a spokesman
            >for Circuit City.
            >
            >However, that chain of consumer electronics and appliance stores
            >apparently did an about-face. The Salvation Army said in a statement that
            >"its prayers have been answered by Circuit City, Michaels and
            >Books-A-Million. Wal-Mart and Kmart will still allow the Salvation Army
            >outside their stores this year."
            >
            >Target's decision "was a huge shock and a huge source of discouragement
            >for us," Lt. David Grindle, a spokesman for the charity, told Fox News
            >Channel.
            >
            ><snip>
            >
            >It's unclear whether the kettle-kicking retailers dislike the Salvation
            >Army or are merely acting out of concern for customers. What is clear is
            >that not all customers like their decisions.
            >
            >"It's a disgrace," South Boston resident Phyllis McElaney told the Globe.
            >"The bell ringers remind you of the meaning of Christmas, that it's about
            >love, caring, and giving."
            >
            >"Call it a safe bet - maybe even a bright-red, bull's-eye, fashionable,
            >smartly priced bet - that American life has become too corporate or
            >complex when Target banishes the Salvation Army's bell ringers,"
            >Indianapolis Star columnist Ruth Holladay wrote.
            >
            >----------------------------------------
            >
            >Letter: Target Grinches Salvation Army
            >Thursday, November 18, 2004
            >Melrose Free Press
            ><<http://www2.townonline.com/melrose/opinion/view.bg?articleid=128353>http://www2.townonline.com/melrose/opinion/view.bg?articleid=128353>
            >
            >Upon hearing the news that the Target stores are banning the appearance of
            >the Salvation Army outside their stores this Christmas season, I was even
            >more convinced of the strong effort to eradicate any form of seeing or
            >thinking off what is of God during the Christmas season. And that the war
            >against God is in the fast lane. The move akin to that of the board of our
            >own Senior Center.
            >
            > I spoke with an authority at Target's headquarters for an explanation
            >of this move on their part and I was told they don't want any
            >"solicitation" taking place. Consequently, I was not impressed. One
            >wonders what mentality some of these decision makers feel they are talking
            >to, when asked for an explanation for the reason of their move.
            >
            > The Salvation Army does not go through the stores approaching
            >customers or employees verbally asking for a donation. The Salvation Army
            >does not approach passers-by on any ground they occupy. They simply ring a
            >bell as a reminder and serve as a representation of what the Christmas
            >season is all about: Love, giving to the poor and not forgetting the less
            >fortunate. For years they have made their welcomed presence to all of us
            >publicly. For years we have enjoyed seeing them and being reminded of a
            >special generous heart at work. They have never been faulted for creating
            >a disturbance or unlawful solicitation. And for a Target representative
            >try to give "solicitation" as a so-called "explanation" for this move, to
            >any thinking person, is nothing but a "lame excuse" for joining the war
            >against God and/or religion going on in this country.
            >
            >----------------------------------------
            >
            >Target bans Salvation Army bell ringers
            >Updated: 11/12/2004 5:46 PM
            >By: Bridget Blythe
            ><<http://www.capitalnews9.com/content/>http://www.capitalnews9.com/content/
            >your_news/capital_region/default.asp?ArID=103988>
            >
            >A shorter URL for the above link:
            >
            ><<http://snipurl.com/axsq>http://snipurl.com/axsq>
            >
            >----------------------------------------
            >
            >CHARITY
            >Targets Salvation Army Ban Unpopular with Some Shoppers
            >By Wendy Griffith
            >CBN News Sr. Reporter
            ><<http://www.cbn.com/CBNNews/News/041119a.asp>http://www.cbn.com/CBNNews/News/041119a.asp>
            >
            >For many, the Salvation Army bell-ringers are simply a part of the
            >Christmas season. Last year, the Army's red kettle campaign raised about
            >90 million dollars nationwide to help the poor. Target stores helped raise
            >nine million of that or 10 percent, by allowing the bell ringers to stand
            >outside its entrances.
            >
            >The sidewalks outside Target stores will be a little quieter this year. No
            >bells ringing, no Merry Christmas or God bless you. No, this year, Target
            >is banning the Salvation Army bell-ringers from all of its more than 1,300
            >stores nationwide.
            >
            >Target's decision is pretty unpopular with some shoppers.
            >
            >Shopper Jeffrey Trimm said, "I thought it was wrong because the Salvation
            >Army is a good cause. They take care of lots of people. I won't be
            >supporting Target this year."
            >
            >Another shopper, Barbara Whitmore, asked, "What's Christmas without the
            >bell-ringers?"
            >
            >There is even a Web site called BanTarget.org, urging people to ban their
            >wallets from Targets cash registers for banning the bell-ringers.
            >
            >----------------------------------------
            >
            >Posted on Thu, Nov. 11, 2004
            >Target silences Salvation Army bells
            >KARLA D. SHORES
            >Knight Ridder Tribune Business News
            ><<http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/business/10150324.htm>http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/business/10150324.htm>
            >
            >Target held out for several years, allowing only The Salvation Army to
            >collect donations in front of its stores despite the company's
            >no-solicitation policy. But this Christmas, the No. 2 U.S. discount
            >retailer will no longer allow the once ubiquitous Salvation Army bell
            >ringers just outside its automatic doors. The company is closing its 1,313
            >stores to the 139-year-old nonprofit Christian organization.
            >
            >----------------------------------------
            >
            >CULTURE DIGEST: Target stores reject Salvation Army kettles; Spiritual
            >collegians have better emotional health; More teens having plastic
            >surgery; Study: Ramadan practices changing
            >Nov 4, 2004
            >By Erin Curry
            >BP News
            ><<http://www.sbcbaptistpress.org/bpnews.asp?ID=19479>http://www.sbcbaptistpress.org/bpnews.asp?ID=19479>
            >
            >NASHVILLE, Tenn. (BP)--The Salvation Army could lose nearly $10 million in
            >donations this Christmas season after Target stores nationwide decided not
            >to allow the annual fundraiser on their property.
            >
            >----------------------------------------
            >
            >Salvation Army Looks To Small Businesses
            >Nov 27, 2004 5:13 pm US/Central
            >WCCO.com
            ><<http://wcco.com/localnews/local_story_332181716.html>http://wcco.com/localnews/local_story_332181716.html>
            >
            >Rochester, Minn. (AP) Salvation Army bellringers in Rochester are looking
            >to small, local businesses this holiday season after being shut out of
            >Target stores.
            >
            ><snip>
            >
            >Some of the businesses are allowing the bellringers and their countertop
            >kettles at the establishments. Others are making donations to the
            >Salvation Army with the sale of specific products.
            >
            >----------------------------------------
            >
            >News
            >Salvation Army bells ring again
            >The Daily Reflector
            ><<http://www.reflector.com/news/newsfd/auto/feed/news/>http://www.reflector.com/news/newsfd/auto/feed/news/
            >2004/11/26/1101531408.18121.7652.0846.html;
            >COXnetJSessionID=Bpk1gfCgc9O9MmJdAb1nVV6UzRAACY4gLNbKSdvMUvxKSa2BX19H!-
            >806845150?urac=n&urvf=11016531096990.929108359686523>
            >
            >A shorter URL for the above link:
            >
            ><<http://snipurl.com/axsz>http://snipurl.com/axsz>
            >
            >Although the Salvation Army will no longer have bell ringers at Target due
            >to the retailer's enforcement of its no solicitation policy, the group
            >found a new location at K & W Cafeteria at the Carolina East Mall. Other
            >locations include Belk, Proffitt's, J.C. Penney, Kmart and Wal-Mart.
            >
            >At the kick-off for the kettle campaign, a representative from Krispy
            >Kreme Doughnuts handed out coupons to all contributors for one free glazed
            >doughnut. The coupons will be available every Saturday of the campaign
            >through Dec. 18.
            >
            >"We want to encourage donations to the Salvation Army Bell Ringers
            >Campaign this holiday season," Amanda Tilley said, market manager of
            >Krispy Kreme. "Giving a coupon for a free doughnut is Krispy Kreme's way
            >of thanking the community for supporting our local Salvation Army
            >chapters."
            >
            >Along with the bell ringing, the Salvation Army started its annual Angel
            >Tree of local families in need. The Salvation Army has 780 families in
            >need of Christmas gifts. Each family has an average of four children per
            >household, which is about 3,000 kids.
            >
            >----------------------------------------
            >----------------------------------------
            >
            >The complete articles may be read at the URLs provided for each.
            >
            >The Salvation Army National Headquarters
            ><<http://www.salvationarmyusa.org/>http://www.salvationarmyusa.org/>
            >
            >Target Corporation
            >Contact Us
            ><<http://www.targetcorp.com/targetcorp_group/contactus/contact.jhtml>http://www.targetcorp.com/targetcorp_group/contactus/contact.jhtml>
            >
            >
            >Sincerely,
            >David Dillard
            >Temple University
            >(215) 204 - 4584
            >jwne@...
            ><<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/net-gold>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/net-gold>
            ><http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/ringleaders/davidd.html>
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            ><<http://www.LIFEofFlorida.org>http://www.LIFEofFlorida.org>
            >World Business Community Advisor
            ><<http://www.WorldBusinessCommunity.org>http://www.WorldBusinessCommunity.org>
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
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