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6283RE: [prbytes] Re: [PRMindshare] Tattoos and the military - a PR-driven move ...

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  • Ned Barnett
    Jul 14, 2014
      Stephen



      I share your general views about tattoos – I don’t get them, and as you
      note, so many people who have tattoos have a mélange of different tats
      overlapping and confusing any given message.



      But these people aren’t all mindless, and they aren’t inherently cowardly or
      anti-patriotic – which brings the issue of the military blocking those who
      have them. Perhaps it’s important for the military to present a certain
      image, but … look at the Navy SEALS who fought and died so heroically in
      Afghanistan (clearly, those men were not mindless – just look at the
      training they went through, and the mental focus needed to survive it) … now
      tell me that they should NOT be welcome in the military, merely because of
      their tats.



      Is this a good PR move by the Army? I’m finding it harder and harder to
      believe. We need the best men and women in the service, “best” based on
      their commitment, patriotism and raw ability, not based on their lack of
      tattoos.



      All My Best


      Ned



      Ned Barnett, APR

      Marketing & PR Fellow, American Hospital Association

      Barnett Marketing Communications

      420 N. Nellis Blvd., A3-276 - Las Vegas NV 89110

      702-561-1167 - cell/text

      www.barnettmarcom.com <http://www.barnettmarcom.com/> - twitter @nedbarnett

      http://pr-marketing2point0.blogspot.com/



      05-6-16 BMC Logo



      From: prbytes@yahoogroups.com [mailto:prbytes@yahoogroups.com]
      Sent: Monday, July 14, 2014 9:31 AM
      To: PRMindshare@yahoogroups.com; prbytes@yahoogroups.com;
      prquorum@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [prbytes] Re: [PRMindshare] Tattoos and the military - a PR-driven
      move ...





      IMO -- It's a fad that has turned into a trend that borders on the senseless
      and bizarre. Tatoos are expensive, painful, nearly permanent, the colors
      fade, and most are illegible at a glance (and who wants to stare?). When
      more than one is placed in close proximity with others on the same body
      part, the clutter only obfuscates whatever message the bearer (barer? =) )
      intended. The outcome, again IMO, is merely a distasteful morass of ink that
      serves no useful purpose other than to convey a not-so-subtle message that
      those who wear them lack a mind of their own.

      If the military services elect to establish regulations governing the number
      and locations of tattoos on the "employees" they hire, perhaps they are onto
      something. It may have to do with mindless egos that follow the equally
      mindless crowd, spend money unwisely, and lack sensibility. Hmmm. Now that I
      think of it, perhaps the military forces are wrong: These may be the kinds
      of robots that will best follow orders to get those same body parts blown
      off in the name of "peace."

      Let the sanity begin.

      Stephen
      STEPHEN RAFE

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: 'Ned Barnett' ned@... [PRMindshare]
      To: PRMindshare@yahoogroups.com ; prbytes@yahoogroups.com ;
      prquorum@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, July 14, 2014 7:16 AM
      Subject: [PRMindshare] Tattoos and the military - a PR-driven move ...

      Now, as someone past 60, I don't "get" the current rage in lavish and often
      grotesque body ink that seems to attract so many Americans in their 20s, 30s
      and even 40s. I don't find it attractive, and I'd be hard-pressed to want to
      hire someone (at least for a responsible, meet-the-public corporate
      position) who had visible-when-dressed-for-work tattoos. But that's really
      beside the point - the issue isn't tattoos, but a PR move (for good or ill)
      made by the US military.

      I mention this because I just saw the incredibly powerful movie, Lone
      Survivor. For those interested in military heroism, this true story is at
      least as powerful as the invasion scene in "Private Ryan" and every bit as
      impactful as "Black Hawk Down," and I can't recommend it highly enough,
      especially since it is based very closely on the book written by that "Lone
      Survivor," Marcus Luttrell. I mention this because, at the end of the movie,
      it showed photos of the real men who'd fought and died on that Afghan
      mountain (or, in one case, survived). These remarkably well-trained Navy
      SEALS are among the world's best warriors, and one of America's true
      national assets. Yet in the photos of the casualties - and the survivor
      (singular) - it was clear that at least all of these remarkably brave
      enlisted men and non-coms - men who risked or gave their lives - had tattoos
      that would disqualify them from enlisting today, at least in the Army.

      And I wondered.

      What price "PR?"

      All My Best

      Ned

      Ned Barnett, APR

      Marketing & PR Fellow, American Hospital Association

      Barnett Marketing Communications

      420 N. Nellis Blvd., A3-276 - Las Vegas NV 89110

      702-561-1167 - cell/text

      www.barnettmarcom.com - twitter @nedbarnett

      http://pr-marketing2point0.blogspot.com/

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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