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6278RE: [prbytes] A PR Disaster Unfolding

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  • Ned Barnett
    Jun 28, 2014
    • 0 Attachment
      We'll have to disagree. I don't feel that hospitals have the right to
      arbitrarily deprive free citizens of the ability to use legal products.


      And I've studied the research, and vanishingly-few former hospital patients
      continued their enforced abstinence once they were free to resume legal
      behavior, free from "big brother" and the PC police, which have made smoking
      a defacto crime (but, apparently, only smoking tobacco).



      I have never smoked, so I'm not defending a right I feel personally
      threatened by its loss - but I believe that when any of us are forcibly
      denied a right without due process, then we're all diminished. And "deprived
      of a right?" How about "Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness?"



      All My Best


      Ned



      Ned Barnett, APR

      Marketing & PR Fellow, American Hospital Association

      Barnett Marketing Communications

      420 N. Nellis Blvd., A3-276 - Las Vegas NV 89110

      702-561-1167 - cell/text

      www.barnettmarcom.com <http://www.barnettmarcom.com/> - twitter @nedbarnett

      http://pr-marketing2point0.blogspot.com/



      05-6-16 BMC Logo



      From: prbytes@yahoogroups.com [mailto:prbytes@yahoogroups.com]
      Sent: Saturday, June 28, 2014 7:42 PM
      To: prbytes@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [prbytes] A PR Disaster Unfolding





      For once, Ned, I need to humbly disagree with you.



      Nonsmoking Policies do NOT equal Political Correctness, an Equation you
      assume.



      Rather, what we know is...

      (1) Smoking is the only product we know that when used as designed is
      designed to kill people and / or shorten their lives.

      (2) People exposed to second hand smoke suffer an increased risk of
      health issues from smoking. For non-smokers, forced exposure to second hand
      smoke certainly is unpleasant. (Although I've never ever smoked in my life,
      not even dope, I grew up with both parents who smoked. And, as a young
      reporter, I worked in those smoke filled newsrooms from 18-30!)

      (3) Cognitive Dissonance is an inevitable result of Hospitals /
      HealthCare -- which are designed to help restore our health, for the most
      part -- to tell us it's perfectly OK and purposely expose friends, family,
      medical staff, nursing staff, even orderlies who must clean up the rooms to
      second hand smoke.

      (4) Rather than assuming / generalizing that all smokers deprived of
      smoking in a hospital setting immediately RETURN TO THEIR SMOKING, frankly,
      my guess is that some see the Hospital setting as an Intervention from God,
      forcing many of them -- who really would rather quit the addiction -- into a
      necessary Smoking Cessation that can open the door out of their addiction.



      I read a great OpEd this week that basically argued that the push to
      legalize Dope grants an imprimateur of correctness to drug usage like that.
      So even if someone can substantiate the claim that it's no more harmful than
      booze -- which I do not concede -- nevertheless, we don't need to open that
      door. Decriminalization, yes, I'm cool with that. Legalization -- y'all come
      and toke up! -- nope, that's a step down the wrong path.



      I do have a strong Libertarian bent, stronger than most, perhaps not as
      strong as yours. You and I, Ned, I think see the Issues du Jour close to
      90-95% similarly. This one stops us from being 100%!



      Sam

      Samuel L Waltz Jr, APR, Fellow PRSA

      Strategic Counselor, Trusted Adviser & Advocate

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      From: prbytes@yahoogroups.com <prbytes@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of 'Ned
      Barnett' ned@... [prbytes] <prbytes@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, June 28, 2014 10:20 PM
      To: prbytes@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [prbytes] A PR Disaster Unfolding





      To me, the problem is one of basic liberty and respect for the individual.
      The last hospital I worked at while smoking was still allowed had laminar
      flow rooms (with overpressure) so the smoke wouldn't go out of the room
      (instead, it was forced out of the building), so no one was hurt by the
      alleged risk of second-hand smoke. But once political correctness
      overwhelmed common sense, they began forcing addicted patients into
      withdrawal for the "crime" of being admitted to a hospital (sometimes
      against their will or without their permission, as in the case of accident
      victims or others brought in by ambulance). The results, as Duncan noted,
      involved patients on the street, smoking - or, as I saw in hospitals after
      the changeover, patients self-discharging themselves because the agony of
      withdrawal was more than they could bear, regardless of short-term health
      risks.

      This was obvious folly - no matter that people were forced to go cold-turkey
      (and not even offered a patch or nicotine gum for the withdrawal), as soon
      as they were out, they'd revert to habit. So it wasn't getting people free
      from addiction - just making an already frightening and uncomfortable
      hospital stay even worse.

      All My Best

      Ned

      Ned Barnett, APR

      Marketing & PR Fellow, American Hospital Association

      Barnett Marketing Communications

      420 N. Nellis Blvd., A3-276 - Las Vegas NV 89110

      702-561-1167 - cell/text

      www.barnettmarcom.com <http://www.barnettmarcom.com/> - twitter @nedbarnett

      http://pr-marketing2point0.blogspot.com/

      05-6-16 BMC Logo

      From: prbytes@yahoogroups.com [mailto:prbytes@yahoogroups.com]
      Sent: Saturday, June 28, 2014 3:01 PM
      To: prbytes@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [prbytes] A PR Disaster Unfolding

      Our hospitals banned smoking years ago. First inside the building, so
      patients with their intravenous polls at their side could be found outside
      the hospital doors. Then it was banned on hospital properly, so patients in
      their gowns and their medicine polls are now out by the road smoking, just
      off hospital property. I think the thinking is that allowing patients easy
      access to smoking was counterproductive. Different attitude I guess.

      Duncan Matheson

      BissettMatheson Communications

      506-457-1627(O)

      506-447-2388(mobile)
      duncan@...
      Twitter: @DuncanFMatheson
      www.bissettmatheson.com

      On Jun 27, 2014, at 7:12 PM, 'Ned Barnett' ned@... [prbytes]
      <prbytes@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      Duncan - there is another factor besides competition (which is what puts
      food on my dinner table). There is an increasing nanny-state attitude in
      hospitals. For instance, they have banned smoking so patients with a tobacco
      addiction are forced into withdrawal while in the hospital - against their
      will, and with really awful medical side-effects. I've know of patients who
      checked out AMA (against medical advice) because the withdrawal is so
      agonizing. This is not in the patient's interest, but "momma knows best"

      I'm no smoker, but I always opposed this policy as counterproductive, and so
      it has proved to be. So I can see the same mindset at work in this new
      policy

      All My Best

      Ned

      Ned Barnett, APR

      Marketing & PR Fellow, American Hospital Association

      Barnett Marketing Communications

      420 N. Nellis Blvd., A3-276 - Las Vegas NV 89110

      702-561-1167 - cell/text

      <http://www.barnettmarcom.com/> www.barnettmarcom.com <
      <http://www.barnettmarcom.com/> http://www.barnettmarcom.com/> - twitter
      @nedbarnett

      <http://pr-marketing2point0.blogspot.com/>
      http://pr-marketing2point0.blogspot.com/

      05-6-16 BMC Logo

      From: <mailto:prbytes@yahoogroups.com> prbytes@yahoogroups.com [
      <mailto:prbytes@yahoogroups.com> mailto:prbytes@yahoogroups.com]
      Sent: Friday, June 27, 2014 7:56 AM
      To: <mailto:prbytes@yahoogroups.com> prbytes@yahoogroups.com
      Cc: <mailto:prmindshare@yahoogroups.com> prmindshare@yahoogroups.com;
      <mailto:prquorum@yahoogroups.com> prquorum@yahoogroups.com;
      <mailto:SmallPRAgencyPros@yahoogroups.com>
      SmallPRAgencyPros@yahoogroups.com; Jube Dankworth
      Subject: Re: [prbytes] A PR Disaster Unfolding

      Ah, that is foreign to us. Our hospitals, not being private or profit
      motived, don't compete for business. Their challenge is to opposite -
      overcrowding - the pressure is to move people out, because they need the
      beds for even sicker people.

      Duncan Matheson

      BissettMatheson Communications

      506-457-1627(O)

      506-447-2388(mobile)
      <mailto:duncan@...> duncan@...
      Twitter: @DuncanFMatheson
      <http://www.bissettmatheson.com/> www.bissettmatheson.com

      On Jun 27, 2014, at 11:47 AM, Edna Kaplan <mailto:kaplan@...>
      kaplan@... [prbytes]
      < <mailto:prbytes@yahoogroups.com> prbytes@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      It sounds from Ned's post as if it's the hospitals themselves initiating the
      health advice, which is a whole new unwelcome development. U.S. hospitals
      do have new incentives to keep patients well. The Affordable Care Act will
      not pay for hospital readmissions for some conditions, so they think they
      need to find ways to keep patients from gorging on Twinkies or sunbathing.
      The Carolina hospitals are taking it too far. I hope there's a huge outcry
      that puts a quick stop to it. Bring on the crisis!

      Edna Kaplan
      President | KOGS Communication LLC
      221 Essex St., Suite 41 | Salem, MA 01970
      __________________________________________________________
      781.639.1910 | mobile: 617.974.8659| @healthPREdna |
      <http://www.kogspr.com/> www.kogspr.com
      < <http://www.kogspr.com/> http://www.kogspr.com/>

      On Jun 27, 2014, at 10:16 AM, Duncan Matheson
      <mailto:duncan@...> duncan@...
      [prbytes] wrote:

      Thanks for the clarification. I can certainly see where the insurers need
      access, of course, but I was confused on who else gets to see them. here in
      Canada, there's nobody else allowed that access. IT sounds, by your last
      paragraph, that the US is not all that different. So am I right to assume
      the fuss is about the insurers trying to benefit from that access, to target
      messages that are in their financial interest, which is keeping you from
      making a claim. So for example if they know from your health records that
      you have a bad heart, and they see from data mining that you have taken to
      buying Twinkies by the case, that they send you an email or letter or
      something telling you that's not a good idea. Is that more or less it?

      Duncan Matheson

      BissettMatheson Communications

      506-457-1627(O)

      506-447-2388(mobile)
      <mailto:duncan@...> duncan@...
      Twitter: @DuncanFMatheson
      <http://www.bissettmatheson.com/> www.bissettmatheson.com <
      <http://www.bissettmatheson.com/> http://www.bissettmatheson.com/>

      On Jun 27, 2014, at 11:03 AM, Edna Kaplan <mailto:kaplan@...>
      kaplan@... [prbytes]
      < <mailto:prbytes@yahoogroups.com> prbytes@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      Duncan,

      It was the health insurer, Blue Cross, who called me, not the hospital. In
      the U.S. insurers, by virtue of paying hospitals and doctors, have access to
      health records of those they insure. They have say over whether the claim
      gets paid - or not.

      As well, a recent new ruling allows data mining companies access to Medicare
      claims information after a spunky little woman-run company in the South sued
      the government. I'm hoping that doesn't include patients personal
      information beyond basic demographics. Medicare, a national program,
      insures those 65+ and people with disabilities. Medicare Part A pays
      hospitals. Medicare Part B pays doctors, but not fully. Consequently, many
      Medicare patients have supplementary insurance from one of many private
      health insurers or, if they qualify financially Medicaid. So here in the
      U.S. our health records are open to many.

      Hospitals, until now, have been vigilant about patient health records.
      There have been many incidents where unauthorized hospital personnel peeked
      at health records of the rich and famous treated at their hospital - and
      been fired for the breach. As for legality, we do have HIPPA laws to
      protect patient privacy. I work mainly with medical device and life
      sciences companies and when doing stories never ask for a patient name until
      the patient has signed a consent.

      - Edna

      Edna Kaplan
      President | KOGS Communication LLC
      221 Essex St., Suite 41 | Salem, MA 01970
      __________________________________________________________
      781.639.1910 | mobile: 617.974.8659| @healthPREdna |
      <http://www.kogspr.com/> www.kogspr.com
      < <http://www.kogspr.com/> http://www.kogspr.com/>

      On Jun 27, 2014, at 9:26 AM, Duncan Matheson
      <mailto:duncan@...> duncan@...
      [prbytes] wrote:

      Interesting developments from a potential crisis communications/ crisis
      management POV. But I'm a little confused. Ned says it is based on
      information from data miners but Edna suggests it is coming from hospital
      records. Maybe the rules are different in the United States, but here in
      Canada, there's a huge difference. Data mining is here to stay and while big
      brotherish for sure, it's not illegal, but crossing over into accessing
      hospital records is criminal. In the U.S. have they gone that far? And if
      so, is that not a criminal offence in your country?

      Duncan Matheson

      BissettMatheson Communications

      506-457-1627(O)

      506-447-2388(mobile)
      <mailto:duncan@...> duncan@...
      Twitter: @DuncanFMatheson
      <http://www.bissettmatheson.com/> www.bissettmatheson.com <
      <http://www.bissettmatheson.com/> http://www.bissettmatheson.com/>

      On Jun 27, 2014, at 10:15 AM, Edna Kaplan <mailto:kaplan@...>
      kaplan@... [prbytes]
      < <mailto:prbytes@yahoogroups.com> prbytes@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      What are they smoking in those hospital marketing departments? I too have
      worked with hospitals but not as extensively as Ned. Still, it's well known
      - even by the idiots in the Carolinas hospital system - that consumers, aka
      hospital patients, are already skittish about privacy of their health
      records, and justifiably so. I was furious when I received a call from
      BC/BS a couple of years ago about my "arthritis." I had mentioned some knee
      pain to my doctor during a physical and he said it might be arthritis from
      years of running, skiing and otherwise stressing my misaligned knees. OK,
      maybe I do have some arthritis but it's still in the "can be ignored" stage.
      I felt completely violated by that call, and so will many of the people
      whose private lives and choices are being called into question by big
      brother. It's been a while but that call still galls me.

      - Edna

      Edna Kaplan
      President | KOGS Communication LLC
      221 Essex St., Suite 41 | Salem, MA 01970
      __________________________________________________________
      781.639.1910 | mobile: 617.974.8659| @healthPREdna |
      <http://www.kogspr.com/> www.kogspr.com
      < <http://www.kogspr.com/> http://www.kogspr.com/>

      On Jun 26, 2014, at 11:37 PM, 'Ned Barnett' <mailto:ned@...>
      ned@... [prbytes]
      wrote:

      As many of you know, I've worked with hospitals and healthcare providers
      since '77, and have written books about hospital PR (I'm also an AHA
      "Fellow" in PR and Marketing). I think I have a fair handle on the kinds of
      things that portend a PR disaster.

      I've just learned about one - a new one - and I've got to wonder what the
      (ahem)-for-brains decision-makers are thinking.

      Here's the deal. The largest hospital company in the Carolinas (which is
      doin this for 2,000,000 people), plus one more hospital system in
      Pennsylvania are both now buying data on people who've been patients -
      getting details of their purchases from data brokers. Then they're
      "advising" these people when they're making personal choices that run
      counter to their best health interests - from smoking or eating Twinkies to
      "forgetting" to renew their gym/fitness center membership.

      Now they do this through their doctors, but the word is already out that the
      hospitals are doing this. If I was a recipient of one of those calls, I'd
      "lose" my doctor and never go to that hospital, ever again. Plus I'd tell
      everyone I know that "Big Brother" has finally arrived - 30 years, late, but
      it's now 1984.

      To show this isn't political, I found reports from Bloomberg (left) and Fox
      News (right) that both "view with alarm" what's going on.

      <
      <http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-06-26/hospitals-soon-see-donuts-to-cigar
      <http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-06-26/hospitals-soon-see-donuts-to-cigar
      %0b>
      >
      http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-06-26/hospitals-soon-see-donuts-to-cigar
      e>

      <http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-06-26/hospitals-soon-see-donuts-to-cigar
      <http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-06-26/hospitals-soon-see-donuts-to-cigar
      %0be>
      e>
      http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-06-26/hospitals-soon-see-donuts-to-cigare
      tte-charges-for-health.html

      <
      <http://foxnewsinsider.com/2014/06/26/creepy-hospitals-using-data-brokers-co
      <http://foxnewsinsider.com/2014/06/26/creepy-hospitals-using-data-brokers-co
      %0b>
      >
      http://foxnewsinsider.com/2014/06/26/creepy-hospitals-using-data-brokers-co
      l>

      <http://foxnewsinsider.com/2014/06/26/creepy-hospitals-using-data-brokers-co
      <http://foxnewsinsider.com/2014/06/26/creepy-hospitals-using-data-brokers-co
      %0bl>
      l>
      http://foxnewsinsider.com/2014/06/26/creepy-hospitals-using-data-brokers-col
      lect-info-about-patients

      Does anybody agree (or disagree) that this is a monumental PR blunder of the
      first order of magnitude, one that's sure to bite those hospitals where they
      sit?

      All My Best

      Ned

      Ned Barnett, APR

      Marketing & PR Fellow, American Hospital Association

      Barnett Marketing Communications

      420 N. Nellis Blvd., A3-276 - Las Vegas NV 89110

      702-561-1167 - cell/text

      < < <http://www.barnettmarcom.com/> http://www.barnettmarcom.com/>
      <http://www.barnettmarcom.com/> http://www.barnettmarcom.com/>
      < <http://www.barnettmarcom.com/> http://www.barnettmarcom.com/>
      <http://www.barnettmarcom.com/> www.barnettmarcom.com - twitter @nedbarnett

      < < <http://pr-marketing2point0.blogspot.com/>
      http://pr-marketing2point0.blogspot.com/>
      <http://pr-marketing2point0.blogspot.com/>
      http://pr-marketing2point0.blogspot.com/>
      < <http://pr-marketing2point0.blogspot.com/>
      http://pr-marketing2point0.blogspot.com/>
      <http://pr-marketing2point0.blogspot.com/>
      http://pr-marketing2point0.blogspot.com/

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