Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: crack and joint filling

Expand Messages
  • hankcarrcell
    We used Farrow and Ball Estate Emulsion on all of our walls. It works very well over structolite and setting type drywall compound. Why do you think that milk
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 21, 2011
      We used Farrow and Ball Estate Emulsion on all of our walls. It works very well over structolite and setting type drywall compound.

      Why do you think that milk paint won't stick to drywall compound? Have you tried it? There are a number of different types of compounds with different formulations that might work for you. The setting type compounds, SR90 and FS90, SR45 and FS45, and even faster versions might work though they are a bit of a pill to work with.

      Shortcuts to filling cracks are rarely shortcuts at all. Do it right or you're going to have to do it over again, and again, and again.

      We tried plaster of paris on our exterior cracks with EcoHouse paint over it with less than good results. The cracks on the outside of our house are much smaller than those on the inside so they're not presenting an immediate danger. I'll get to them at some point.

      Hank.




      --- In practical-sbc@yahoogroups.com, "Donna" <orleansdonna@...> wrote:
      >
      > I remember viewing this years ago. Thanks for the reminder. But my plaster walls are hand rubbed and I hope to paint them with milk paint which just flakes off drywall goo, and the drywalled walls and ceiling are all painted as I thought I might be just caulking the interior joints. My knees are week thinking about taping and mudding but if that's the only option...
      >
      > How have you repaired any exterior cracks or have you?
      >
      >
      > --- In practical-sbc@yahoogroups.com, "hankcarrcell" <hank@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I use 90 minute drywall compound and fibreglass mesh drywall tape. I've done all of the drywall to plaster joints this way and used the same method to repair cracks in the plaster on the inside of the straw bale wall.
      > >
      > > I fix cracks once and have not had one re-crack in 8 years. Yes, the folks on the other lists will tell you that while it has been 8 years failure is imminent and at any moment these cracks will reopen so widely that it will create a rift in the universe that will suck out entire house inside out, I'm not losing any sleep at night.
      > >
      > > Here's a video that I posted a while ago. The sounds sucks and I do the entire thing in my PJs because I was sick and tired of the BS on the other SB lists about how cement plasters constantly crack and how long it takes to fix them. This video is in real time, in a crack under a window in the kid's bedroom, and is completely invisible to this day. I can post a picture if anyone is sceptical and wants proof.
      > >
      > > I hope this helps.
      > >
      > > http://www.dna.ca/sbportal/fixing-a-crack.shtml
      > >
      > > Hank.
      > >
      > > http://www.facebook.com/hank.carr
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In practical-sbc@yahoogroups.com, "Donna" <orleansdonna@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Where would one find current methods of crack filling and joint sealing techniques? I need to seal the joints between drywall and plaster all through-out the interior and need advice on product selection. Also, have recurring cracks on the plaster so my sanded and non-sanded grout attempts have not worked out. Really would like to get at this, but need some advice.
      > > > Thanks in advance.
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Ben Polley
      Hi all, I think that Dean s description of Camel s Back s crackfill procedure is correct. We do much the same with only a couple of differences: * instad of a
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 24, 2011
        Hi all,

        I think that Dean's description of Camel's Back's crackfill procedure
        is correct. We do much the same with only a couple of differences:

        * instad of a can opener, we use a grout removal tool (Ricard's brand
        available at Cdn Tire for <$10). This tool creates a groove that is
        only about 1/8" wide with the sides of the opening being 90 degrees to
        wall face/surface. In our experience, this has provided enough depth
        and surface adhesion/friction to keep the filler intact and immobile
        even through changing seasonal and daily temperatures.

        * we use polymer enhanced grout for exterior walls - sanded grout for
        grainy sponge finished walls and unsanded grout for more polished,
        trowel finished walls. We also used Type N (haven't tried Type S,
        which is ordinarily a below grade, more cementitious product but can't
        imagine any issue with it...Hank's suggestion of wetting the
        subsurface first is important for bonding/curing with these products)
        high bond cement-lime for years, but found that after a couple of
        seasons in some isolated instances it began to crumble and fall from
        the groove we created. With a few years of testing/applications, we
        have not seen the same issue with the grout.

        * for interior wall surfaces we generally just use drywall joint
        compound and rarely do we do more than work this in to the
        pre-existing crack - no opening the crack further with the grout
        removal tool we use on exterior wall faces.

        For both interior and exterior crack fills, we try to only fill the
        crack as the filler materials usually have a slightly different
        texture than the wall face, which then can show up through the finish
        paint. That said, this strategy can sometimes lead to very slight
        hairline cracks becoming visible again over time. On the interior, a
        remedy/prevention for this would be to mud and tape the joint as
        demonstrated by Hank.

        With respect to the joint between a drywall surface and plaster, we
        either will mud and tape the joint (our preferred method though it
        requires that the plaster be very level/consistent) with a taper that
        we heavily sand back to about 2" from the corner (to minimize the
        inconsistent finish textures as noted above). Alternatively we use
        DAP Alex Plus interior caulking at the joint. This caulking will
        accept the silicate paint finish we most often use on the plastered
        surfaces as well as being suitable for clay paints, latex paints and
        (I think) milk/casein paints.

        Cheers,
        Ben Polley


        Quoting Dean Reeds <dean@...>:

        > Agreed - getting cracks filled is the important part. Determining the BEST
        > way to do it is better done with a pint in-hand after the cracks are sealed!
        >
        > This is what I took away from Camel's Back - I'm sure some stuff is off the
        > mark a bit, perhaps they will be able to chime in and set things straight:
        >
        > I used the sharp triangle end of a can opener (
        > http://kitchens-utensils.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/can-opener.jpg ) to
        > scrape out a 'V' in the crack, then dusted it, sprayed it with water from a
        > spray bottle so water covered the whole surface of the crack and the
        > surrounding area. Then I used a small putty knife (or my gloved hand) to
        > work Type-S with sand into the crack and the immediate surrounding area,
        > trying to leave it close to flush with as little extra plaster as possible.
        > Then after about 30 minutes I brushed it down to try and get the same
        > texture. The plaster that is in the crack will dry/cure? a lot slower than
        > the thin layer on the existing wall face, so it basically brushes off
        > leaving things generally flush.
        >
        > I don't want to give the impression that the cracks blend in perfectly and
        > disappear, but it's definitely an improvement. We'll see what it looks like
        > once the paint dries.
        >
        > One additional tip (lesson learned) - practice on the cracks that will be
        > seen the least - save the front entrance way til last since regardless of
        > how you choose to the fill the cracks, you'll be better at it on your last
        > one than on your first attempt.
        >
        > Hope this helps,
        > Dean
        >
        > On Fri, Oct 21, 2011 at 2:44 PM, hankcarrcell <hank@...> wrote:
        >
        >> **
        >>
        >>
        >> Don't get me wrong...I'm not suggesting that the method that I used is the
        >> right one. It worked for me and I'm happy with it. All I'm saying is that
        >> there is no easy way to fill cracks and gaps. You just have to do it well
        >> the first time so that you don't have to do it again.
        >>
        >> Type S seems like a good answer. Did you wet the cracks before putting in
        >> th Type S? did you add sand or just use it straight?
        >>
        >> Hank.
        >>
        >>
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
      • Donna
        Thanks one and all for those responses. I have attempted a couple of crack fills and it hasn t been pretty. I imagine once painted they will show, but that s
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 25, 2011
          Thanks one and all for those responses. I have attempted a couple of crack fills and it hasn't been pretty. I imagine once painted they will show, but that's life. I need to go back in though, as they have reopened, so this time I'll try the drywall compound.
          Happy to hear there is a caulk that can be used at the wall and stucco intersections.
          Thanks again.

          --- In practical-sbc@yahoogroups.com, Ben Polley <ben@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi all,
          >
          > I think that Dean's description of Camel's Back's crackfill procedure
          > is correct. We do much the same with only a couple of differences:
          >
          > * instad of a can opener, we use a grout removal tool (Ricard's brand
          > available at Cdn Tire for <$10). This tool creates a groove that is
          > only about 1/8" wide with the sides of the opening being 90 degrees to
          > wall face/surface. In our experience, this has provided enough depth
          > and surface adhesion/friction to keep the filler intact and immobile
          > even through changing seasonal and daily temperatures.
          >
          > * we use polymer enhanced grout for exterior walls - sanded grout for
          > grainy sponge finished walls and unsanded grout for more polished,
          > trowel finished walls. We also used Type N (haven't tried Type S,
          > which is ordinarily a below grade, more cementitious product but can't
          > imagine any issue with it...Hank's suggestion of wetting the
          > subsurface first is important for bonding/curing with these products)
          > high bond cement-lime for years, but found that after a couple of
          > seasons in some isolated instances it began to crumble and fall from
          > the groove we created. With a few years of testing/applications, we
          > have not seen the same issue with the grout.
          >
          > * for interior wall surfaces we generally just use drywall joint
          > compound and rarely do we do more than work this in to the
          > pre-existing crack - no opening the crack further with the grout
          > removal tool we use on exterior wall faces.
          >
          > For both interior and exterior crack fills, we try to only fill the
          > crack as the filler materials usually have a slightly different
          > texture than the wall face, which then can show up through the finish
          > paint. That said, this strategy can sometimes lead to very slight
          > hairline cracks becoming visible again over time. On the interior, a
          > remedy/prevention for this would be to mud and tape the joint as
          > demonstrated by Hank.
          >
          > With respect to the joint between a drywall surface and plaster, we
          > either will mud and tape the joint (our preferred method though it
          > requires that the plaster be very level/consistent) with a taper that
          > we heavily sand back to about 2" from the corner (to minimize the
          > inconsistent finish textures as noted above). Alternatively we use
          > DAP Alex Plus interior caulking at the joint. This caulking will
          > accept the silicate paint finish we most often use on the plastered
          > surfaces as well as being suitable for clay paints, latex paints and
          > (I think) milk/casein paints.
          >
          > Cheers,
          > Ben Polley
          >
          >
          > Quoting Dean Reeds <dean@...>:
          >
          > > Agreed - getting cracks filled is the important part. Determining the BEST
          > > way to do it is better done with a pint in-hand after the cracks are sealed!
          > >
          > > This is what I took away from Camel's Back - I'm sure some stuff is off the
          > > mark a bit, perhaps they will be able to chime in and set things straight:
          > >
          > > I used the sharp triangle end of a can opener (
          > > http://kitchens-utensils.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/can-opener.jpg ) to
          > > scrape out a 'V' in the crack, then dusted it, sprayed it with water from a
          > > spray bottle so water covered the whole surface of the crack and the
          > > surrounding area. Then I used a small putty knife (or my gloved hand) to
          > > work Type-S with sand into the crack and the immediate surrounding area,
          > > trying to leave it close to flush with as little extra plaster as possible.
          > > Then after about 30 minutes I brushed it down to try and get the same
          > > texture. The plaster that is in the crack will dry/cure? a lot slower than
          > > the thin layer on the existing wall face, so it basically brushes off
          > > leaving things generally flush.
          > >
          > > I don't want to give the impression that the cracks blend in perfectly and
          > > disappear, but it's definitely an improvement. We'll see what it looks like
          > > once the paint dries.
          > >
          > > One additional tip (lesson learned) - practice on the cracks that will be
          > > seen the least - save the front entrance way til last since regardless of
          > > how you choose to the fill the cracks, you'll be better at it on your last
          > > one than on your first attempt.
          > >
          > > Hope this helps,
          > > Dean
          > >
          > > On Fri, Oct 21, 2011 at 2:44 PM, hankcarrcell <hank@...> wrote:
          > >
          > >> **
          > >>
          > >>
          > >> Don't get me wrong...I'm not suggesting that the method that I used is the
          > >> right one. It worked for me and I'm happy with it. All I'm saying is that
          > >> there is no easy way to fill cracks and gaps. You just have to do it well
          > >> the first time so that you don't have to do it again.
          > >>
          > >> Type S seems like a good answer. Did you wet the cracks before putting in
          > >> th Type S? did you add sand or just use it straight?
          > >>
          > >> Hank.
          > >>
          > >>
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          >
        • Donna
          I was at a sb home where the folks had painted milk-paint over drywall and it just flaked off, but I don t know if the walls had been primed or not. They just
          Message 4 of 10 , Nov 3, 2011
            I was at a sb home where the folks had painted milk-paint over drywall and it just flaked off, but I don't know if the walls had been primed or not. They just advised that I don't attempt it.

            So the F&B Emulsion will be ok on the cement lime plaster? Thats great news.
            Thanks again.
            --- In practical-sbc@yahoogroups.com, "hankcarrcell" <hank@...> wrote:
            >
            > We used Farrow and Ball Estate Emulsion on all of our walls. It works very well over structolite and setting type drywall compound.
            >
            > Why do you think that milk paint won't stick to drywall compound? Have you tried it? There are a number of different types of compounds with different formulations that might work for you. The setting type compounds, SR90 and FS90, SR45 and FS45, and even faster versions might work though they are a bit of a pill to work with.
            >
            > Shortcuts to filling cracks are rarely shortcuts at all. Do it right or you're going to have to do it over again, and again, and again.
            >
            > We tried plaster of paris on our exterior cracks with EcoHouse paint over it with less than good results. The cracks on the outside of our house are much smaller than those on the inside so they're not presenting an immediate danger. I'll get to them at some point.
            >
            > Hank.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In practical-sbc@yahoogroups.com, "Donna" <orleansdonna@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I remember viewing this years ago. Thanks for the reminder. But my plaster walls are hand rubbed and I hope to paint them with milk paint which just flakes off drywall goo, and the drywalled walls and ceiling are all painted as I thought I might be just caulking the interior joints. My knees are week thinking about taping and mudding but if that's the only option...
            > >
            > > How have you repaired any exterior cracks or have you?
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In practical-sbc@yahoogroups.com, "hankcarrcell" <hank@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > I use 90 minute drywall compound and fibreglass mesh drywall tape. I've done all of the drywall to plaster joints this way and used the same method to repair cracks in the plaster on the inside of the straw bale wall.
            > > >
            > > > I fix cracks once and have not had one re-crack in 8 years. Yes, the folks on the other lists will tell you that while it has been 8 years failure is imminent and at any moment these cracks will reopen so widely that it will create a rift in the universe that will suck out entire house inside out, I'm not losing any sleep at night.
            > > >
            > > > Here's a video that I posted a while ago. The sounds sucks and I do the entire thing in my PJs because I was sick and tired of the BS on the other SB lists about how cement plasters constantly crack and how long it takes to fix them. This video is in real time, in a crack under a window in the kid's bedroom, and is completely invisible to this day. I can post a picture if anyone is sceptical and wants proof.
            > > >
            > > > I hope this helps.
            > > >
            > > > http://www.dna.ca/sbportal/fixing-a-crack.shtml
            > > >
            > > > Hank.
            > > >
            > > > http://www.facebook.com/hank.carr
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > --- In practical-sbc@yahoogroups.com, "Donna" <orleansdonna@> wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > Where would one find current methods of crack filling and joint sealing techniques? I need to seal the joints between drywall and plaster all through-out the interior and need advice on product selection. Also, have recurring cracks on the plaster so my sanded and non-sanded grout attempts have not worked out. Really would like to get at this, but need some advice.
            > > > > Thanks in advance.
            > > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.