Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Air Tap, no relation to Spinal Tap

Expand Messages
  • Chris Green
    In this months Fine Homebuilding offerings online, there s a blog article about a device named Air Tap, from a company named AirGenerate. Rather than try to
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 15, 2009
      In this months' Fine Homebuilding offerings online, there's a blog article about a device named Air Tap, from a company named AirGenerate.


      Rather than try to explain it myself, I'll just reprint FH's text: Quote:

      "If you have an electric water heater, you can disconnect the heating elements because you won’t need them. And if your water heater is gas-fired, you can shut off the gas supply. This module will heat water more efficiently than your old gas or electric water heater.

      How does it work? A compressor in the unit extracts heat from the surrounding air and uses it to heat the water. The compressor runs on electricity, but according to the manufacturer’s Web site, it only uses a very small amount of electricity. So technically speaking, the heat is free—in a manner of speaking.

      Not only that, it will produce as much usable cool air as a small window-mounted AC unit. Once the unit extracts the heat from the air, it distributes cooled air, which can be ducted into a floor register. Because it’s replacing warm air with cool air, it acts as a dehumidifier as well."

      End of quote. Source:

      http://www.finehomebuilding.com/item/9114/get-free-hot-water-ac-and-dry-air

      Okay, so we're discussing a gizmo which sucks the heat out of the household air to pre-heat the DHW.
      And cools and dehumidifies the house while doing so. I think this option merits some looking into if you live somewhere where cooling ( and drying the air... ) buildings are a major requirement.

      AirGenerate link:
      http://www.airgenerate.com/

      On one of the pages at this website, the manufacturer states:

      "If it takes four units of energy to heat water, AirTap™ utilizes one unit from an electric outlet, and three units from the surrounding air, reducing your energy consumption by about 2.5 times that of your current water heater.

      To put into perspective, AirTap™ uses less power than an 8-cup coffee machine to run the compressor, and its energy consumption level is equivalent to keeping two coffee machines on for a day."

      Right....IF this is an accurate generalization, this puts the device into a range where it can be run off solar power provided by some of the smaller panels available.

      Even without that option, the idea of putting the heat energy you remove from the air to work, instead of just dumping it outside, is a pretty good one.

      I notice this system is approved by the USGBC, among others.

      I don't have any experience with this system-- I just learned about it-- and would be interested in hearing from any listmembers who have used or experienced it.


      Cheers,

      Chris Green.







      __________________________________________________________________
      Be smarter than spam. See how smart SpamGuard is at giving junk email the boot with the All-new Yahoo! Mail. Click on Options in Mail and switch to New Mail today or register for free at http://mail.yahoo.ca
    • Roger Benham
      Hello People, By the sound of it, does it matter if it was inside or out? If it works by using a temperature reduction, would it matter if it was inside or
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 15, 2009
        Hello People,



        By the sound of it, does it matter if it was inside or out? If it works by using a temperature reduction, would it matter if it was inside or out? If it was outside, you could have valve the heat in during Winter and out during Summer. Cool air when you need it in Summer, and presumably the device works better in the Summer heat..?



        To: practical-sbc@yahoogroups.com
        From: hjwiersma@...
        Date: Thu, 15 Oct 2009 06:29:34 -0400
        Subject: RE: [practical-sbc] Air Tap, no relation to Spinal Tap





        Hi Chris

        The Air Tap sounds great for the summer months and especially in my old damp
        basement. It winter time, however, we would need to make up the heat lost.
        What is the noise level from the compressor and finally the cost of the
        unit?

        Henry

        _____

        From: practical-sbc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:practical-sbc@yahoogroups.com]
        On Behalf Of Chris Green
        Sent: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 5:02 AM
        To: SB-r-us; Practical SBC
        Subject: [practical-sbc] Air Tap, no relation to Spinal Tap

        In this months' Fine Homebuilding offerings online, there's a blog article
        about a device named Air Tap, from a company named AirGenerate.

        Rather than try to explain it myself, I'll just reprint FH's text: Quote:

        "If you have an electric water heater, you can disconnect the heating
        elements because you won't need them. And if your water heater is gas-fired,
        you can shut off the gas supply. This module will heat water more
        efficiently than your old gas or electric water heater.

        How does it work? A compressor in the unit extracts heat from the
        surrounding air and uses it to heat the water. The compressor runs on
        electricity, but according to the manufacturer's Web site, it only uses a
        very small amount of electricity. So technically speaking, the heat is
        free-in a manner of speaking.

        Not only that, it will produce as much usable cool air as a small
        window-mounted AC unit. Once the unit extracts the heat from the air, it
        distributes cooled air, which can be ducted into a floor register. Because
        it's replacing warm air with cool air, it acts as a dehumidifier as well."

        End of quote. Source:

        http://www.finehome
        <http://www.finehomebuilding.com/item/9114/get-free-hot-water-ac-and-dry-air
        > building.com/item/9114/get-free-hot-water-ac-and-dry-air

        Okay, so we're discussing a gizmo which sucks the heat out of the household
        air to pre-heat the DHW.
        And cools and dehumidifies the house while doing so. I think this option
        merits some looking into if you live somewhere where cooling ( and drying
        the air... ) buildings are a major requirement.

        AirGenerate link:
        http://www.airgener <http://www.airgenerate.com/> ate.com/

        On one of the pages at this website, the manufacturer states:

        "If it takes four units of energy to heat water, AirTapT utilizes one unit
        from an electric outlet, and three units from the surrounding air, reducing
        your energy consumption by about 2.5 times that of your current water
        heater.

        To put into perspective, AirTapT uses less power than an 8-cup coffee
        machine to run the compressor, and its energy consumption level is
        equivalent to keeping two coffee machines on for a day."

        Right....IF this is an accurate generalization, this puts the device into a
        range where it can be run off solar power provided by some of the smaller
        panels available.

        Even without that option, the idea of putting the heat energy you remove
        from the air to work, instead of just dumping it outside, is a pretty good
        one.

        I notice this system is approved by the USGBC, among others.

        I don't have any experience with this system-- I just learned about it-- and
        would be interested in hearing from any listmembers who have used or
        experienced it.

        Cheers,

        Chris Green.

        __________________________________________________________
        Be smarter than spam. See how smart SpamGuard is at giving junk email the
        boot with the All-new Yahoo! Mail. Click on Options in Mail and switch to
        New Mail today or register for free at http://mail. <http://mail.yahoo.ca>
        yahoo.ca

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]









        _________________________________________________________________
        Use Hotmail to send and receive mail from your different email accounts.
        http://clk.atdmt.com/UKM/go/167688463/direct/01/

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Chris Green
        ... I don t know how noisy the unit is- probably not very, but I can t say for certain since I just learned about this. The unit costs $699 US, according to
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 15, 2009
          --- On Thu, 10/15/09, hjwiersma@... <hjwiersma@...> wrote:

          > Hi Chris
          >

          > The Air Tap sounds great for the summer months and
          > especially in my old damp
          > basement. It winter time, however, we would need to make up
          > the heat lost.
          > What is the noise level from the compressor and finally the
          > cost of the
          > unit? 

          I don't know how noisy the unit is- probably not very, but I can't say for certain since I just learned about this. The unit costs $699 US, according to their price list, with an optional shroud to direct the cool air where you want it costing about $70- $75. Shipping and installation will add to that, of course.

          Cheers,

          Chris Green.



          __________________________________________________________________
          Yahoo! Canada Toolbar: Search from anywhere on the web, and bookmark your favourite sites. Download it now
          http://ca.toolbar.yahoo.com
        • nzsven
          I live in New Zealand where heat pumps are very common. It seems the Airtap is a heat pump which is being used to heat domestic hot water. Heatpumps can work
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 16, 2009
            I live in New Zealand where heat pumps are very common. It seems the Airtap is a heat pump which is being used to heat domestic hot water.

            Heatpumps can work inside and can be quite noisy, this may be a good quiet one....

            Heatpumps can work outside but as the temperature drops, so does the efficiency. Generally if the temperature drops far below freezing the advantages are lost so use outside during a Canadian winter is probably not an option. Some heatpump manufacturers say their units work to -15C, good for NZ but may not be so good in CA.

            Heatpumps in above freezing conditions can give between three and four times the efficiency of a conventional electric heating system.

            Sven Johnston
            Sol Design Ltd.
          • Leslea
            This sounds like a good idea... I m just wondering if such a system would be a supplemental system to a regular hot water tank... Ie: if you could run it on
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 16, 2009
              This sounds like a good idea... I'm just wondering if such a system would be a supplemental system to a regular hot water tank... Ie: if you could run it on heat pump during the hot months, then back to gas or electric during the cold months?

              Leslea


              --- On Wed, 9/16/09, nzsven <nzsven@...> wrote:
              >
              > I live in New Zealand where heat
              > pumps are very common.  It seems the Airtap is a heat
              > pump which is being used to heat domestic hot water.
              >
              > Heatpumps can work inside and can be quite noisy, this may
              > be a good quiet one....
              >
              > Heatpumps can work outside but as the temperature drops, so
              > does the efficiency.  Generally if the temperature
              > drops far below freezing the advantages are lost so use
              > outside during a Canadian winter is probably not an
              > option.  Some heatpump manufacturers say their units
              > work to -15C, good for NZ but may not be so good in CA.
              >
              > Heatpumps in above freezing conditions can give between
              > three and four times the efficiency of a conventional
              > electric heating system.
              >
              > Sven Johnston
              > Sol Design Ltd.


              __________________________________________________________________
              Make your browsing faster, safer, and easier with the new Internet Explorer® 8. Optimized for Yahoo! Get it Now for Free! at http://downloads.yahoo.com/ca/internetexplorer/
            • hjwiersma@airnet.ca
              Hi Chris The Air Tap sounds great for the summer months and especially in my old damp basement. It winter time, however, we would need to make up the heat
              Message 6 of 6 , Oct 15, 2009
                Hi Chris



                The Air Tap sounds great for the summer months and especially in my old damp
                basement. It winter time, however, we would need to make up the heat lost.
                What is the noise level from the compressor and finally the cost of the
                unit?



                Henry



                _____

                From: practical-sbc@yahoogroups.com [mailto:practical-sbc@yahoogroups.com]
                On Behalf Of Chris Green
                Sent: Tuesday, September 15, 2009 5:02 AM
                To: SB-r-us; Practical SBC
                Subject: [practical-sbc] Air Tap, no relation to Spinal Tap





                In this months' Fine Homebuilding offerings online, there's a blog article
                about a device named Air Tap, from a company named AirGenerate.


                Rather than try to explain it myself, I'll just reprint FH's text: Quote:

                "If you have an electric water heater, you can disconnect the heating
                elements because you won't need them. And if your water heater is gas-fired,
                you can shut off the gas supply. This module will heat water more
                efficiently than your old gas or electric water heater.

                How does it work? A compressor in the unit extracts heat from the
                surrounding air and uses it to heat the water. The compressor runs on
                electricity, but according to the manufacturer's Web site, it only uses a
                very small amount of electricity. So technically speaking, the heat is
                free-in a manner of speaking.

                Not only that, it will produce as much usable cool air as a small
                window-mounted AC unit. Once the unit extracts the heat from the air, it
                distributes cooled air, which can be ducted into a floor register. Because
                it's replacing warm air with cool air, it acts as a dehumidifier as well."

                End of quote. Source:

                http://www.finehome
                <http://www.finehomebuilding.com/item/9114/get-free-hot-water-ac-and-dry-air
                > building.com/item/9114/get-free-hot-water-ac-and-dry-air

                Okay, so we're discussing a gizmo which sucks the heat out of the household
                air to pre-heat the DHW.
                And cools and dehumidifies the house while doing so. I think this option
                merits some looking into if you live somewhere where cooling ( and drying
                the air... ) buildings are a major requirement.

                AirGenerate link:
                http://www.airgener <http://www.airgenerate.com/> ate.com/

                On one of the pages at this website, the manufacturer states:

                "If it takes four units of energy to heat water, AirTapT utilizes one unit
                from an electric outlet, and three units from the surrounding air, reducing
                your energy consumption by about 2.5 times that of your current water
                heater.

                To put into perspective, AirTapT uses less power than an 8-cup coffee
                machine to run the compressor, and its energy consumption level is
                equivalent to keeping two coffee machines on for a day."

                Right....IF this is an accurate generalization, this puts the device into a
                range where it can be run off solar power provided by some of the smaller
                panels available.

                Even without that option, the idea of putting the heat energy you remove
                from the air to work, instead of just dumping it outside, is a pretty good
                one.

                I notice this system is approved by the USGBC, among others.

                I don't have any experience with this system-- I just learned about it-- and
                would be interested in hearing from any listmembers who have used or
                experienced it.

                Cheers,

                Chris Green.


                __________________________________________________________
                Be smarter than spam. See how smart SpamGuard is at giving junk email the
                boot with the All-new Yahoo! Mail. Click on Options in Mail and switch to
                New Mail today or register for free at http://mail. <http://mail.yahoo.ca>
                yahoo.ca





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.