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impact of new gTLDs

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  • Akihiro Koike
    Dear All, We are a registry operator of new generic top-level domain(gTLD). Therefore we are interested in the impact of new gTLDs. I d like your thoughts on
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 15, 2014
      Dear All,

      We are a registry operator of new generic top-level domain(gTLD).
      Therefore we are interested in the impact of new gTLDs.
      I'd like your thoughts on what kind of impact the appearance of new
      gTLDs has on software implementation.

      Best regards.

      --
      Akihiro
    • Viktor Dukhovni
      ... My personal view is that from a purely Postfix perspective, these have little impact. Provided nobody expects to receive email at a gTLD domain rather
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 15, 2014
        On Mon, Jun 16, 2014 at 10:29:03AM +0900, Akihiro Koike wrote:

        > We are a registry operator of new generic top-level domain(gTLD).
        > Therefore we are interested in the impact of new gTLDs.
        > I'd like your thoughts on what kind of impact the appearance of new
        > gTLDs has on software implementation.

        My personal view is that from a purely Postfix perspective, these
        have little impact. Provided nobody expects to receive email at
        a gTLD domain rather than a sub-domain:

        Won't work:

        user@example

        Will work:

        user@...

        From a policy perspective, I remain opposed to the introduction of
        ad-hoc gTLDs that are not simply native-language IDNA variants of
        existing ccTLDs. However, such opposition is rather academic at
        this point, the boat has sailed.

        --
        Viktor.
      • Erwan David
        ... I do not know whether there is a email server there, but dk. has a A record, thus user@dk might be a valid email address...
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 16, 2014
          Le 16/06/2014 04:02, Viktor Dukhovni a écrit :
          > On Mon, Jun 16, 2014 at 10:29:03AM +0900, Akihiro Koike wrote:
          >
          >> We are a registry operator of new generic top-level domain(gTLD).
          >> Therefore we are interested in the impact of new gTLDs.
          >> I'd like your thoughts on what kind of impact the appearance of new
          >> gTLDs has on software implementation.
          > My personal view is that from a purely Postfix perspective, these
          > have little impact. Provided nobody expects to receive email at
          > a gTLD domain rather than a sub-domain:
          >
          > Won't work:
          >
          > user@example
          >

          I do not know whether there is a email server there, but dk. has a A
          record, thus user@dk might be a valid email address...
        • Viktor Dukhovni
          ... Though technically valid, it is in practice unusable. Almost all senders will rewrite this to . Getting the whole world to
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 16, 2014
            On Mon, Jun 16, 2014 at 09:12:18AM +0200, Erwan David wrote:

            > I do not know whether there is a email server there, but dk. has a A
            > record, thus user@dk might be a valid email address...

            Though "technically" valid, it is in practice unusable. Almost
            all senders will rewrite this to <user@dk.$senders_domain>. Getting
            the whole world to disable short hostnames is a quixotic exercise.

            --
            Viktor.
            >
          • DTNX Postmaster
            ... IMHO, adding A or MX records in a root zone testifies to a lack of understanding of DNS as an interconnected system. One just really shouldn t, even though
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 16, 2014
              On 16 Jun 2014, at 17:22, Viktor Dukhovni <postfix-users@...> wrote:

              > On Mon, Jun 16, 2014 at 09:12:18AM +0200, Erwan David wrote:
              >
              >> I do not know whether there is a email server there, but dk. has a A
              >> record, thus user@dk might be a valid email address...
              >
              > Though "technically" valid, it is in practice unusable. Almost
              > all senders will rewrite this to <user@dk.$senders_domain>. Getting
              > the whole world to disable short hostnames is a quixotic exercise.

              IMHO, adding A or MX records in a root zone testifies to a lack of
              understanding of DNS as an interconnected system. One just really
              shouldn't, even though it is technically correct.

              Saw this last week, as another example, a list of TLDs with MX records
              defined;

              https://gist.github.com/ddol/1445736

              And then there's user confusion;

              http://dk.

              While the above works for me, I reckon that quite a few users will
              perceive this as incomplete, like someone forgot to add 'com' at the
              end.

              In other words, if you do run a TLD of any kind, do us all a favour,
              and admit that it's unlikely that it'll ever go beyond a neat trick
              that few people will understand.

              Just leave them out of your root zone.

              Mvg,
              Joni
            • Wietse Venema
              ... It s not just a problem with email. ssh appends the domain, web browsers append the domain, just to name a few. That said, you can disable such behavior
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 16, 2014
                Viktor Dukhovni:
                > On Mon, Jun 16, 2014 at 09:12:18AM +0200, Erwan David wrote:
                >
                > > I do not know whether there is a email server there, but dk. has a A
                > > record, thus user@dk might be a valid email address...
                >
                > Though "technically" valid, it is in practice unusable. Almost
                > all senders will rewrite this to <user@dk.$senders_domain>. Getting
                > the whole world to disable short hostnames is a quixotic exercise.

                It's not just a problem with email. ssh appends the domain,
                web browsers append the domain, just to name a few.

                That said, you can disable such behavior with Postfix 2.8 and later:

                /etc/postfix/main.cf:
                append_dot_mydomain = 0
                # The following is the default:
                # smtp_dns_resolver_options =

                For Postfix there is no need to meddle with res_defnames or res_dnsrch
                options in /etc/resolv.conf, because Postfix already ignores those.

                Wietse
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