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Re: Is it possible to manually copy files in incoming directory?

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  • Wietse Venema
    ... If moving files between different file systems (directories under different mount points), Postfix should be stopped otherwise it may read a queue file
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 9, 2013
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      Viktor Dukhovni:
      > On Wed, Oct 09, 2013 at 06:09:31PM +0200, Bernardo Pons wrote:
      >
      > > If, for some reason, the files containing messages present in the incoming
      > > directory had to be moved to a temp directory, is it possible to copy them
      > > back to the incoming directory in order to be re-queued by Postfix?
      >
      > The details depend on what you mean by "moved to". Can you give
      > a precise description of what was done to the original "incoming"
      > queue files:
      >
      > - which queue files were selected for relocation?
      >
      > - how were they relocated ?
      >
      > - where did they end up (directory in the same filesystem or
      > different filesystem)?
      >
      > - were file permission bits preserved?
      >
      > - were the leaf file names preserved?
      >
      > If the target filesystem is the same as the original, and the
      > incoming files were simply renamed (keeping the same inode,
      > permissions, and leaf file name) into a holding directory on the
      > same filesystem, you can simply rename(2) them back into "incoming/".
      >
      > [ I sometimes use: perl -e 'rename(@ARGV);' "$src" "$dst", to make sure
      > I'm doing a rename and not a copy. The mv(1) command will on many
      > systems perform a copy and unlink when moving files across filesystems. ]

      If moving files between different file systems (directories under
      different mount points), Postfix should be stopped otherwise it may
      read a queue file before it is complete.

      Wietse
    • Bernardo Pons
      Well, rather than moved, all files into the incoming directory were copied to a different folder in the same filesystem. So the files, and thus the inodes, are
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 9, 2013
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        Well, rather than moved, all files into the incoming directory were copied to a different folder in the same filesystem. 
        So the files, and thus the inodes, are different from the originals. The filenames are preserved.
        The ownership was set back to the original (user and group running Postfix)
        Permissions for these files are the originals (rwx------). 
        Postfix service was stopped before.


        2013/10/9 Wietse Venema <wietse@...>
        Viktor Dukhovni:
        > On Wed, Oct 09, 2013 at 06:09:31PM +0200, Bernardo Pons wrote:
        >
        > > If, for some reason, the files containing messages present in the incoming
        > > directory had to be moved to a temp directory, is it possible to copy them
        > > back to the incoming directory in order to be re-queued by Postfix?
        >
        > The details depend on what you mean by "moved to".  Can you give
        > a precise description of what was done to the original "incoming"
        > queue files:
        >
        >     - which queue files were selected for relocation?
        >
        >     - how were they relocated ?
        >
        >     - where did they end up (directory in the same filesystem or
        >       different filesystem)?
        >
        >     - were file permission bits preserved?
        >
        >     - were the leaf file names preserved?
        >
        > If the target filesystem is the same as the original, and the
        > incoming files were simply renamed (keeping the same inode,
        > permissions, and leaf file name) into a holding directory on the
        > same filesystem, you can simply rename(2) them back into "incoming/".
        >
        > [ I sometimes use: perl -e 'rename(@ARGV);' "$src" "$dst", to make sure
        >   I'm doing a rename and not a copy.  The mv(1) command will on many
        >   systems perform a copy and unlink when moving files across filesystems. ]

        If moving files between different file systems (directories under
        different mount points), Postfix should be stopped otherwise it may
        read a queue file before it is complete.

                Wietse



        --
        -- 
        Bernardo Pons
      • Wietse Venema
        ... Good. Also stop Postfix before copying/moving/whatever the files into place. I suggest placing them into the maildrop directory. Before starting postfix,
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 9, 2013
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          Bernardo Pons:
          > Well, rather than moved, all files into the incoming directory were copied
          > to a different folder in the same filesystem.
          > So the files, and thus the inodes, are different from the originals. The
          > filenames are preserved.
          > The ownership was set back to the original (user and group running Postfix)
          > Permissions for these files are the originals (rwx------).
          > Postfix service was stopped before.

          Good. Also stop Postfix before copying/moving/whatever the files
          into place. I suggest placing them into the maildrop directory.
          Before starting postfix, run the postsuper command until it stops
          reporting file name changes.

          Wietse
          >
          > 2013/10/9 Wietse Venema <wietse@...>
          >
          > > Viktor Dukhovni:
          > > > On Wed, Oct 09, 2013 at 06:09:31PM +0200, Bernardo Pons wrote:
          > > >
          > > > > If, for some reason, the files containing messages present in the
          > > incoming
          > > > > directory had to be moved to a temp directory, is it possible to copy
          > > them
          > > > > back to the incoming directory in order to be re-queued by Postfix?
          > > >
          > > > The details depend on what you mean by "moved to". Can you give
          > > > a precise description of what was done to the original "incoming"
          > > > queue files:
          > > >
          > > > - which queue files were selected for relocation?
          > > >
          > > > - how were they relocated ?
          > > >
          > > > - where did they end up (directory in the same filesystem or
          > > > different filesystem)?
          > > >
          > > > - were file permission bits preserved?
          > > >
          > > > - were the leaf file names preserved?
          > > >
          > > > If the target filesystem is the same as the original, and the
          > > > incoming files were simply renamed (keeping the same inode,
          > > > permissions, and leaf file name) into a holding directory on the
          > > > same filesystem, you can simply rename(2) them back into "incoming/".
          > > >
          > > > [ I sometimes use: perl -e 'rename(@ARGV);' "$src" "$dst", to make sure
          > > > I'm doing a rename and not a copy. The mv(1) command will on many
          > > > systems perform a copy and unlink when moving files across
          > > filesystems. ]
          > >
          > > If moving files between different file systems (directories under
          > > different mount points), Postfix should be stopped otherwise it may
          > > read a queue file before it is complete.
          > >
          > > Wietse
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > --
          > Bernardo Pons
        • Bernardo Pons
          It worked! Thank you Wietse & Viktor for your help. Great piece of software Postfix! 2013/10/9 Wietse Venema ... -- -- Bernardo Pons
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 9, 2013
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            It worked!
            Thank you Wietse & Viktor for your help.
            Great piece of software Postfix!


            2013/10/9 Wietse Venema <wietse@...>
            Bernardo Pons:
            > Well, rather than moved, all files into the incoming directory were copied
            > to a different folder in the same filesystem.
            > So the files, and thus the inodes, are different from the originals. The
            > filenames are preserved.
            > The ownership was set back to the original (user and group running Postfix)
            > Permissions for these files are the originals (rwx------).
            > Postfix service was stopped before.

            Good. Also stop Postfix before copying/moving/whatever the files
            into place. I suggest placing them into the maildrop directory.
            Before starting postfix, run the postsuper command until it stops
            reporting file name changes.

                    Wietse
            >
            > 2013/10/9 Wietse Venema <wietse@...>
            >
            > > Viktor Dukhovni:
            > > > On Wed, Oct 09, 2013 at 06:09:31PM +0200, Bernardo Pons wrote:
            > > >
            > > > > If, for some reason, the files containing messages present in the
            > > incoming
            > > > > directory had to be moved to a temp directory, is it possible to copy
            > > them
            > > > > back to the incoming directory in order to be re-queued by Postfix?
            > > >
            > > > The details depend on what you mean by "moved to".  Can you give
            > > > a precise description of what was done to the original "incoming"
            > > > queue files:
            > > >
            > > >     - which queue files were selected for relocation?
            > > >
            > > >     - how were they relocated ?
            > > >
            > > >     - where did they end up (directory in the same filesystem or
            > > >       different filesystem)?
            > > >
            > > >     - were file permission bits preserved?
            > > >
            > > >     - were the leaf file names preserved?
            > > >
            > > > If the target filesystem is the same as the original, and the
            > > > incoming files were simply renamed (keeping the same inode,
            > > > permissions, and leaf file name) into a holding directory on the
            > > > same filesystem, you can simply rename(2) them back into "incoming/".
            > > >
            > > > [ I sometimes use: perl -e 'rename(@ARGV);' "$src" "$dst", to make sure
            > > >   I'm doing a rename and not a copy.  The mv(1) command will on many
            > > >   systems perform a copy and unlink when moving files across
            > > filesystems. ]
            > >
            > > If moving files between different file systems (directories under
            > > different mount points), Postfix should be stopped otherwise it may
            > > read a queue file before it is complete.
            > >
            > >         Wietse
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            > --
            > --
            > Bernardo Pons



            --
            -- 
            Bernardo Pons
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