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Re: mail delivery to Inbox , not to spam

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  • lists@rhsoft.net
    ... you as sender are not the one who decides what at the destination happens with a message and by whatever rules messages are flagged as spam
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 11, 2013
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      Am 11.09.2013 10:51, schrieb Vishal Agarwal:
      > How can I be sure that the email send through my server to anybody should
      > delivered to recipients inbox; not to the spam folder. Where all the
      > default settings are used in recipient inbox.

      you as sender are not the one who decides what
      at the destination happens with a message and
      by whatever rules messages are flagged as spam
    • Vishal Agarwal
      That s true. I wanted to know; that besides the special rules from any recipient server; is there some way to get the message delivered to the users inbox ?
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 11, 2013
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        That's true.
        I wanted to know; that besides the special rules from any recipient  server; is there some way to get the message delivered to the users inbox ?

        Regards,



        On Wed, Sep 11, 2013 at 2:26 PM, Paul Hoffman <paul@...> wrote:
        On Wed, Sep 11, 2013 at 02:21:54PM +0530, Vishal Agarwal wrote:
        > How can I be sure that the email send through my server to anybody should
        > delivered to recipients inbox; not  to the spam folder. Where all the
        > default settings are used in recipient inbox.

        You can't be sure.  Ever.  The receiving SMTP server says "I accept that
        message" but can then do absolutely anything it wants -- throw the
        message away, bounce it, forward it to the CIA, etc.

        Paul.

        --
        Paul Hoffman <paul@...>
        Systems Librarian
        Fenway Libraries Online
        c/o Wentworth Institute of Technology
        550 Huntington Ave.
        Boston, MA 02115
        (617) 442-2384 (FLO main number)

      • /dev/rob0
        Top-posting fixed. Please don t top-post here. Thank you. ... There are no such settings. And as such, this really is off-topic here. You could bring it to
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 11, 2013
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          Top-posting fixed. Please don't top-post here. Thank you.

          On Wed, Sep 11, 2013 at 03:08:16PM +0530, Vishal Agarwal wrote:
          > On Wed, Sep 11, 2013 at 2:26 PM, Paul Hoffman <paul@...> wrote:
          > > On Wed, Sep 11, 2013 at 02:21:54PM +0530, Vishal Agarwal wrote:
          > > > How can I be sure that the email send through my server to
          > > > to anybody should delivered to recipients inbox; not to the
          > > > spam folder. Where all the default settings are used in
          > > > recipient inbox.

          There are no such settings. And as such, this really is off-topic
          here. You could bring it to SDLU <http://spammers.dontlike.us>, a
          mailing list for discussion of spam and related issues, and be on
          topic. (Disclaimer: I am a SDLU moderator.)

          > > You can't be sure. Ever. The receiving SMTP server says
          > > "I accept that message" but can then do absolutely anything
          > > it wants -- throw the message away, bounce it, forward it
          > > to the CIA, etc.
          > >
          > That's true.
          > I wanted to know; that besides the special rules from any
          > recipient server; is there some way to get the message
          > delivered to the users inbox ?

          You can follow best practices and possibly improve your chances.
          First and foremost: do NOT send ANY spam. Send only to confirmed
          addresses, diligently prune your list of rejects. No repurposing
          lists; only send what the recipient signed up to get.

          http://www.rhyolite.com/anti-spam/that-which-we-dont.html is an
          amusing look at a long list of spammers' excuses. Are yours on it?
          Bad sign, if so. It means you're doing something wrong.

          Second: buy your connectivity from a reputable provider which is not
          listed on any major spam DNSBLs. Look them up at Spamhaus. Do they
          have longterm unresolved issues?

          Third: ensure that your sending host has valid FCrDNS (forward-
          confirmed reverse DNS): your IP address should resolve to
          $myhostname, which in turn should resolve to your IP address.

          Fourth: remove yourself from Spamhaus PBL if applicable. Sign up at
          DNSWL.org's whitelist service.

          If any of this does not make sense to you, I strongly suggest that
          you should not send bulk mail directly. Hire an ESP like Sendgrid,
          Mailchimp, or Constant Contact. They can quickly clean up your list
          and get mail into the recipient's inbox. Assuming that there is
          revenue at stake in your sending, spend a bit of it.
          --
          http://rob0.nodns4.us/ -- system administration and consulting
          Offlist GMX mail is seen only if "/dev/rob0" is in the Subject:
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