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Re: Would somebody let me know what I need to do to improve this setup.

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  • DTNX Postmaster
    ... [snip] ... Compare this to ours; == $ /usr/sbin/postconf -nf |grep message_size_limit message_size_limit = 31457280 == And the default;
    Message 1 of 16 , Aug 6, 2013
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      On Aug 7, 2013, at 02:32, John Allen <john@...> wrote:

      > root@bilbo:~# postconf -nf

      [snip]

      > message_size_limit = 34359738368

      Compare this to ours;

      ==
      $ /usr/sbin/postconf -nf |grep message_size_limit
      message_size_limit = 31457280
      ==

      And the default;

      http://www.postfix.org/postconf.5.html#message_size_limit

      Is there any particular reason you need to accept messages 32 GB in size?

      Mvg,
      Joni
    • DTNX Postmaster
      ... [snip] ... http://www.postfix.org/postconf.5.html#smtp_tls_cert_file Are you sure you need those there? Have a look at your own config, and look up every
      Message 2 of 16 , Aug 6, 2013
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        On Aug 7, 2013, at 02:32, John Allen <john@...> wrote:

        > root@bilbo:~# postconf -nf

        [snip]

        > smtp_tls_cert_file = /root/ssl/certs/KLaM_Mail.pem
        > smtp_tls_key_file = /root/ssl/private/KLaM_Mail.key

        http://www.postfix.org/postconf.5.html#smtp_tls_cert_file

        Are you sure you need those there?

        Have a look at your own config, and look up every setting in the
        documentation. Ask yourself if there are good reasons you are
        overriding the default, and whether your custom setting still makes
        sense given the recommendations from the documentation.

        Mvg,
        Joni
      • John Allen
        ... Yes. We support a business that designs and manufactures packaging and displays. The sort of thing you might see in the aisle of a supermarket or store
        Message 3 of 16 , Aug 7, 2013
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          On 07/08/2013 1:49 AM, DTNX Postmaster wrote:
          > On Aug 7, 2013, at 02:32, John Allen <john@...> wrote:
          >
          >> root@bilbo:~# postconf -nf
          > [snip]
          >
          >> message_size_limit = 34359738368
          > Compare this to ours;
          >
          > ==
          > $ /usr/sbin/postconf -nf |grep message_size_limit
          > message_size_limit = 31457280
          > ==
          >
          > And the default;
          >
          > http://www.postfix.org/postconf.5.html#message_size_limit
          >
          > Is there any particular reason you need to accept messages 32 GB in size?
          >
          > Mvg,
          > Joni
          >
          Yes. We support a business that designs and manufactures packaging and
          displays. The sort of thing you might see in the aisle of a supermarket
          or store selling gum, personal care products. The graphics, art work
          and design of these need to be sent to the people involved. We have
          looked into using services like Dropbox but the problem with all of
          these is copyright. Our customers legal eagles have advise against such
          services as they may compromise their copyright on anything stored on
          such services.

          OT: It is the same advice and reasoning they gave against using public
          cloud services, some of whose terms of service essentially strip the
          user of all copyright ownership.
        • John Allen
          ... I am not sure. One of the problems we have is that a many of our clients work force are road warriors . While SASL allows us to confirm who is calling it
          Message 4 of 16 , Aug 7, 2013
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            On 07/08/2013 2:09 AM, DTNX Postmaster wrote:
            > On Aug 7, 2013, at 02:32, John Allen <john@...> wrote:
            >
            >> root@bilbo:~# postconf -nf
            > [snip]
            >
            >> smtp_tls_cert_file = /root/ssl/certs/KLaM_Mail.pem
            >> smtp_tls_key_file = /root/ssl/private/KLaM_Mail.key
            > http://www.postfix.org/postconf.5.html#smtp_tls_cert_file
            >
            > Are you sure you need those there?
            >
            > Have a look at your own config, and look up every setting in the
            > documentation. Ask yourself if there are good reasons you are
            > overriding the default, and whether your custom setting still makes
            > sense given the recommendations from the documentation.
            >
            > Mvg,
            > Joni
            >
            I am not sure. One of the problems we have is that a many of our clients
            work force are "road warriors". While SASL allows us to confirm who is
            calling it does not protect the content from snooping, whereas TLS does.
            As some of the Far eastern countries are not averse to pilfering ideas
            we think this is worth while. However, suggestions for alternatives are
            welcome.
          • Mikael Bak
            ... I don t recall email being the only alternative to public cloud file storage solutions. Set up a file server of you own and keep copyrights in house. 32GB
            Message 5 of 16 , Aug 7, 2013
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              On 08/07/2013 12:03 PM, John Allen wrote:
              >> Is there any particular reason you need to accept messages 32 GB in size?
              >>
              >>
              > Yes. We support a business that designs and manufactures packaging and
              > displays. The sort of thing you might see in the aisle of a supermarket
              > or store selling gum, personal care products. The graphics, art work
              > and design of these need to be sent to the people involved. We have
              > looked into using services like Dropbox but the problem with all of
              > these is copyright. Our customers legal eagles have advise against such
              > services as they may compromise their copyright on anything stored on
              > such services.
              >
              > OT: It is the same advice and reasoning they gave against using public
              > cloud services, some of whose terms of service essentially strip the
              > user of all copyright ownership.
              >
              >

              I don't recall email being the only alternative to public cloud file
              storage solutions.

              Set up a file server of you own and keep copyrights in house.
              32GB sized email messages is a mistake IMO.

              Mikael
            • DTNX Postmaster
              ... Have you read the documentation? I don t think you have. The smtp_tls_cert_file setting is for outgoing connections only, as in, your server sending to
              Message 6 of 16 , Aug 7, 2013
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                On Aug 7, 2013, at 12:15, John Allen <john@...> wrote:

                > On 07/08/2013 2:09 AM, DTNX Postmaster wrote:
                >> On Aug 7, 2013, at 02:32, John Allen <john@...> wrote:
                >>
                >>> root@bilbo:~# postconf -nf
                >> [snip]
                >>
                >>> smtp_tls_cert_file = /root/ssl/certs/KLaM_Mail.pem
                >>> smtp_tls_key_file = /root/ssl/private/KLaM_Mail.key
                >> http://www.postfix.org/postconf.5.html#smtp_tls_cert_file
                >>
                >> Are you sure you need those there?
                >>
                >> Have a look at your own config, and look up every setting in the
                >> documentation. Ask yourself if there are good reasons you are
                >> overriding the default, and whether your custom setting still makes
                >> sense given the recommendations from the documentation.
                >>
                > I am not sure. One of the problems we have is that a many of our clients work force are "road warriors". While SASL allows us to confirm who is calling it does not protect the content from snooping, whereas TLS does. As some of the Far eastern countries are not averse to pilfering ideas we think this is worth while. However, suggestions for alternatives are welcome.

                Have you read the documentation? I don't think you have. The
                'smtp_tls_cert_file' setting is for outgoing connections only, as in,
                your server sending to other servers.

                Has nothing to do with road warriors, and unless you have an upstream
                relay that requires a client certificate to send mail, you should
                probably stick with the recommended defaults.

                Mvg,
                Joni
              • Thomas Harold
                ... Or implement a version control system (such as subversion) that communicates over HTTPS or SSH. We find it works better for road-warriors because only the
                Message 7 of 16 , Aug 7, 2013
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                  On 8/7/2013 7:09 AM, Mikael Bak wrote:
                  >
                  > I don't recall email being the only alternative to public cloud file
                  > storage solutions.
                  >
                  > Set up a file server of you own and keep copyrights in house.
                  > 32GB sized email messages is a mistake IMO.
                  >

                  Or implement a version control system (such as subversion) that
                  communicates over HTTPS or SSH. We find it works better for
                  road-warriors because only the file differences get transmitted and
                  faster because they're working on local copies of the files.
                • DTNX Postmaster
                  ... And they are regularly sending you files, via e-mail, up to 32 GB in size? Attachments that are larger than, say, 1 GB? Does the sending mail server allow
                  Message 8 of 16 , Aug 7, 2013
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                    On Aug 7, 2013, at 12:03, John Allen <john@...> wrote:

                    > On 07/08/2013 1:49 AM, DTNX Postmaster wrote:
                    >> On Aug 7, 2013, at 02:32, John Allen <john@...> wrote:
                    >>
                    >>> root@bilbo:~# postconf -nf
                    >> [snip]
                    >>
                    >>> message_size_limit = 34359738368
                    >> Compare this to ours;
                    >>
                    >> ==
                    >> $ /usr/sbin/postconf -nf |grep message_size_limit
                    >> message_size_limit = 31457280
                    >> ==
                    >>
                    >> And the default;
                    >>
                    >> http://www.postfix.org/postconf.5.html#message_size_limit
                    >>
                    >> Is there any particular reason you need to accept messages 32 GB in size?
                    >>
                    > Yes. We support a business that designs and manufactures packaging and displays. The sort of thing you might see in the aisle of a supermarket or store selling gum, personal care products. The graphics, art work and design of these need to be sent to the people involved. We have looked into using services like Dropbox but the problem with all of these is copyright. Our customers legal eagles have advise against such services as they may compromise their copyright on anything stored on such services.
                    >
                    > OT: It is the same advice and reasoning they gave against using public cloud services, some of whose terms of service essentially strip the user of all copyright ownership.

                    And they are regularly sending you files, via e-mail, up to 32 GB in
                    size? Attachments that are larger than, say, 1 GB? Does the sending
                    mail server allow attachments that big in outgoing mail? Does your
                    queue directory reside on a partition that has that much room?

                    When have you last grepped through your logs to look at the actual
                    sizes of the messages that are coming in? What is the largest message
                    size you have received in, say, the last four weeks?

                    I find it all a wee bit hard to believe. You see, we also support
                    similar businesses, and have for many years. For large files, they are
                    uploaded over SFTP, and downloaded via same, or HTTP. And increasingly,
                    they are using WeTransfer for this. Check their terms, several of our
                    clients have abandoned their local file transfer setups for it.

                    But please, stop abusing e-mail for this. It's insane, and a disaster
                    waiting to happen.

                    Mvg,
                    Joni
                  • Patrick Lists
                    On 08/07/2013 12:03 PM, John Allen wrote: [snip] ... Maybe look into an on-premise dropbox alternative: http://owncloud.org/ Regards, Patrick
                    Message 9 of 16 , Aug 7, 2013
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                      On 08/07/2013 12:03 PM, John Allen wrote:
                      [snip]
                      > Yes. We support a business that designs and manufactures packaging and
                      > displays. The sort of thing you might see in the aisle of a supermarket
                      > or store selling gum, personal care products. The graphics, art work
                      > and design of these need to be sent to the people involved. We have
                      > looked into using services like Dropbox but the problem with all of
                      > these is copyright. Our customers legal eagles have advise against such
                      > services as they may compromise their copyright on anything stored on
                      > such services.
                      >
                      > OT: It is the same advice and reasoning they gave against using public
                      > cloud services, some of whose terms of service essentially strip the
                      > user of all copyright ownership.

                      Maybe look into an on-premise dropbox alternative: http://owncloud.org/

                      Regards,
                      Patrick
                    • LuKreme
                      ... Or something like ShareFile. (I ve never used ShareFile, only heard of it).
                      Message 10 of 16 , Aug 7, 2013
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                        On 07 Aug 2013, at 06:37 , Patrick Lists <postfix-list@...> wrote:

                        > On 08/07/2013 12:03 PM, John Allen wrote:
                        > [snip]
                        >> Yes. We support a business that designs and manufactures packaging and
                        >> displays. The sort of thing you might see in the aisle of a supermarket
                        >> or store selling gum, personal care products. The graphics, art work
                        >> and design of these need to be sent to the people involved. We have
                        >> looked into using services like Dropbox but the problem with all of
                        >> these is copyright. Our customers legal eagles have advise against such
                        >> services as they may compromise their copyright on anything stored on
                        >> such services.
                        >>
                        >> OT: It is the same advice and reasoning they gave against using public
                        >> cloud services, some of whose terms of service essentially strip the
                        >> user of all copyright ownership.
                        >
                        > Maybe look into an on-premise dropbox alternative: http://owncloud.org/

                        Or something like ShareFile.

                        (I've never used ShareFile, only heard of it).

                        <http://www.sharefile.com/?aid=24499555820&src=google&kw=sharefile&gclid=CNKL3smz67gCFelAMgod6VYAFw>

                        --
                        Ah we're lonely, we're romantic / and the cider's laced with acid / and
                        the Holy Spirit's crying, Where's the beef? / And the moon is swimming
                        naked / and the summer night is fragrant / with a mighty expectation of
                        relief
                      • John Allen
                        ... We have already setup a webdav system for saving large attachments, the in house users are supposed to use this for internal mail. This still leaves the
                        Message 11 of 16 , Aug 7, 2013
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                          On 07/08/2013 8:25 AM, DTNX Postmaster wrote:
                          > On Aug 7, 2013, at 12:03, John Allen <john@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >> On 07/08/2013 1:49 AM, DTNX Postmaster wrote:
                          >>> On Aug 7, 2013, at 02:32, John Allen <john@...> wrote:
                          >>>
                          >>>> root@bilbo:~# postconf -nf
                          >>> [snip]
                          >>>
                          >>>> message_size_limit = 34359738368
                          >>> Compare this to ours;
                          >>>
                          >>> ==
                          >>> $ /usr/sbin/postconf -nf |grep message_size_limit
                          >>> message_size_limit = 31457280
                          >>> ==
                          >>>
                          >>> And the default;
                          >>>
                          >>> http://www.postfix.org/postconf.5.html#message_size_limit
                          >>>
                          >>> Is there any particular reason you need to accept messages 32 GB in size?
                          >>>
                          >> Yes. We support a business that designs and manufactures packaging and displays. The sort of thing you might see in the aisle of a supermarket or store selling gum, personal care products. The graphics, art work and design of these need to be sent to the people involved. We have looked into using services like Dropbox but the problem with all of these is copyright. Our customers legal eagles have advise against such services as they may compromise their copyright on anything stored on such services.
                          >>
                          >> OT: It is the same advice and reasoning they gave against using public cloud services, some of whose terms of service essentially strip the user of all copyright ownership.
                          > And they are regularly sending you files, via e-mail, up to 32 GB in
                          > size? Attachments that are larger than, say, 1 GB? Does the sending
                          > mail server allow attachments that big in outgoing mail? Does your
                          > queue directory reside on a partition that has that much room?
                          >
                          > When have you last grepped through your logs to look at the actual
                          > sizes of the messages that are coming in? What is the largest message
                          > size you have received in, say, the last four weeks?
                          >
                          > I find it all a wee bit hard to believe. You see, we also support
                          > similar businesses, and have for many years. For large files, they are
                          > uploaded over SFTP, and downloaded via same, or HTTP. And increasingly,
                          > they are using WeTransfer for this. Check their terms, several of our
                          > clients have abandoned their local file transfer setups for it.
                          >
                          > But please, stop abusing e-mail for this. It's insane, and a disaster
                          > waiting to happen.
                          >
                          > Mvg,
                          > Joni
                          We have already setup a webdav system for saving large attachments, the
                          in house users are supposed to use this for internal mail.
                          This still leaves the problem of contractors and suppliers. The problem
                          here is how to isolate them from each other and the whole from the
                          outsider.
                        • DTNX Postmaster
                          ... It is a solved problem, has been for years. For example, a SFTP or FTPS server; contractors and suppliers each get their own login and are locked into
                          Message 12 of 16 , Aug 7, 2013
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                            On Aug 7, 2013, at 16:32, John Allen <john@...> wrote:

                            >>>> Is there any particular reason you need to accept messages 32 GB in size?
                            >>>>
                            >>> Yes. We support a business that designs and manufactures packaging and displays. The sort of thing you might see in the aisle of a supermarket or store selling gum, personal care products. The graphics, art work and design of these need to be sent to the people involved. We have looked into using services like Dropbox but the problem with all of these is copyright. Our customers legal eagles have advise against such services as they may compromise their copyright on anything stored on such services.
                            >>>
                            >>> OT: It is the same advice and reasoning they gave against using public cloud services, some of whose terms of service essentially strip the user of all copyright ownership.
                            >> And they are regularly sending you files, via e-mail, up to 32 GB in
                            >> size? Attachments that are larger than, say, 1 GB? Does the sending
                            >> mail server allow attachments that big in outgoing mail? Does your
                            >> queue directory reside on a partition that has that much room?
                            >>
                            >> When have you last grepped through your logs to look at the actual
                            >> sizes of the messages that are coming in? What is the largest message
                            >> size you have received in, say, the last four weeks?
                            >>
                            >> I find it all a wee bit hard to believe. You see, we also support
                            >> similar businesses, and have for many years. For large files, they are
                            >> uploaded over SFTP, and downloaded via same, or HTTP. And increasingly,
                            >> they are using WeTransfer for this. Check their terms, several of our
                            >> clients have abandoned their local file transfer setups for it.
                            >>
                            >> But please, stop abusing e-mail for this. It's insane, and a disaster
                            >> waiting to happen.
                            >
                            > We have already setup a webdav system for saving large attachments, the in house users are supposed to use this for internal mail.
                            > This still leaves the problem of contractors and suppliers. The problem here is how to isolate them from each other and the whole from the outsider.

                            It is a solved problem, has been for years. For example, a SFTP or FTPS
                            server; contractors and suppliers each get their own login and are
                            locked into their home directory. They only see their own files, no one
                            else's.

                            Or you use one of the several options out there in terms of web based
                            project management and whatnot, such as activeCollab, or one of the
                            suggestions made here on the list. Each user only has access to
                            relevant projects, and you have the advantage of storing file metadata
                            such as description, comments, versioning and so on.

                            And at the very least, review your logs for the actual sizes of
                            incoming messages, and see what usage dictates. I have a hunch it is
                            going to be much lower than your current limit.

                            Mvg,
                            Joni
                          • Sam Flint
                            Try ownCloud, it provides webdav and sharing. ... -- Sam Flint flintfam.org/~swflint
                            Message 13 of 16 , Aug 9, 2013
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                              Try ownCloud, it provides webdav and sharing.

                              On Wed, Aug 7, 2013 at 10:17 AM, DTNX Postmaster <postmaster@...> wrote:
                              > On Aug 7, 2013, at 16:32, John Allen <john@...> wrote:
                              >
                              >>>>> Is there any particular reason you need to accept messages 32 GB in size?
                              >>>>>
                              >>>> Yes. We support a business that designs and manufactures packaging and displays. The sort of thing you might see in the aisle of a supermarket or store selling gum, personal care products. The graphics, art work and design of these need to be sent to the people involved. We have looked into using services like Dropbox but the problem with all of these is copyright. Our customers legal eagles have advise against such services as they may compromise their copyright on anything stored on such services.
                              >>>>
                              >>>> OT: It is the same advice and reasoning they gave against using public cloud services, some of whose terms of service essentially strip the user of all copyright ownership.
                              >>> And they are regularly sending you files, via e-mail, up to 32 GB in
                              >>> size? Attachments that are larger than, say, 1 GB? Does the sending
                              >>> mail server allow attachments that big in outgoing mail? Does your
                              >>> queue directory reside on a partition that has that much room?
                              >>>
                              >>> When have you last grepped through your logs to look at the actual
                              >>> sizes of the messages that are coming in? What is the largest message
                              >>> size you have received in, say, the last four weeks?
                              >>>
                              >>> I find it all a wee bit hard to believe. You see, we also support
                              >>> similar businesses, and have for many years. For large files, they are
                              >>> uploaded over SFTP, and downloaded via same, or HTTP. And increasingly,
                              >>> they are using WeTransfer for this. Check their terms, several of our
                              >>> clients have abandoned their local file transfer setups for it.
                              >>>
                              >>> But please, stop abusing e-mail for this. It's insane, and a disaster
                              >>> waiting to happen.
                              >>
                              >> We have already setup a webdav system for saving large attachments, the in house users are supposed to use this for internal mail.
                              >> This still leaves the problem of contractors and suppliers. The problem here is how to isolate them from each other and the whole from the outsider.
                              >
                              > It is a solved problem, has been for years. For example, a SFTP or FTPS
                              > server; contractors and suppliers each get their own login and are
                              > locked into their home directory. They only see their own files, no one
                              > else's.
                              >
                              > Or you use one of the several options out there in terms of web based
                              > project management and whatnot, such as activeCollab, or one of the
                              > suggestions made here on the list. Each user only has access to
                              > relevant projects, and you have the advantage of storing file metadata
                              > such as description, comments, versioning and so on.
                              >
                              > And at the very least, review your logs for the actual sizes of
                              > incoming messages, and see what usage dictates. I have a hunch it is
                              > going to be much lower than your current limit.
                              >
                              > Mvg,
                              > Joni
                              >



                              --
                              Sam Flint
                              flintfam.org/~swflint
                            • John Hudak
                              So the real issue is a concern that one of the customers may gain access to files from another one of your customers and steal some copyright info? So the
                              Message 14 of 16 , Aug 9, 2013
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                                So the real issue is a concern that one of the customers may gain access to files from another one of your customers and steal some copyright info?

                                So the legal folks want 'proof' that orgs like Dropbox have protections in place to avoid the theft of copyright info?  I doubt that any org will give out that guarantee - but maybe there are....

                                If data confidentiality is the issue, the use of ownCloud in your organization is going to put that burden of proof on your shoulders, so you will have to deal with all the technical and legal issues.

                                Why not use the best encryption techniques available e.g. 256 bit AES encryption (?)  to secure the data?



                                On Fri, Aug 9, 2013 at 10:53 AM, Sam Flint <harmonicnm7h@...> wrote:
                                Try ownCloud, it provides webdav and sharing.

                                On Wed, Aug 7, 2013 at 10:17 AM, DTNX Postmaster <postmaster@...> wrote:
                                > On Aug 7, 2013, at 16:32, John Allen <john@...> wrote:
                                >
                                >>>>> Is there any particular reason you need to accept messages 32 GB in size?
                                >>>>>
                                >>>> Yes. We support a business that designs and manufactures packaging and displays. The sort of thing you might see in the aisle of a supermarket or store selling gum, personal care products.  The graphics, art work and design of these need to be sent to the people involved. We have looked into using services like Dropbox but the problem with all of these is copyright. Our customers legal eagles have advise against such services as they may compromise their copyright on anything stored on such services.
                                >>>>
                                >>>> OT: It is the same advice and reasoning they gave against using public cloud services, some of whose terms of service essentially strip the user of all copyright ownership.
                                >>> And they are regularly sending you files, via e-mail, up to 32 GB in
                                >>> size? Attachments that are larger than, say, 1 GB? Does the sending
                                >>> mail server allow attachments that big in outgoing mail? Does your
                                >>> queue directory reside on a partition that has that much room?
                                >>>
                                >>> When have you last grepped through your logs to look at the actual
                                >>> sizes of the messages that are coming in? What is the largest message
                                >>> size you have received in, say, the last four weeks?
                                >>>
                                >>> I find it all a wee bit hard to believe. You see, we also support
                                >>> similar businesses, and have for many years. For large files, they are
                                >>> uploaded over SFTP, and downloaded via same, or HTTP. And increasingly,
                                >>> they are using WeTransfer for this. Check their terms, several of our
                                >>> clients have abandoned their local file transfer setups for it.
                                >>>
                                >>> But please, stop abusing e-mail for this. It's insane, and a disaster
                                >>> waiting to happen.
                                >>
                                >> We have already setup a webdav system for saving large attachments, the in house users are supposed to use this for internal mail.
                                >> This still leaves the problem of contractors and suppliers. The problem here is how to isolate them from each other and the whole from the outsider.
                                >
                                > It is a solved problem, has been for years. For example, a SFTP or FTPS
                                > server; contractors and suppliers each get their own login and are
                                > locked into their home directory. They only see their own files, no one
                                > else's.
                                >
                                > Or you use one of the several options out there in terms of web based
                                > project management and whatnot, such as activeCollab, or one of the
                                > suggestions made here on the list. Each user only has access to
                                > relevant projects, and you have the advantage of storing file metadata
                                > such as description, comments, versioning and so on.
                                >
                                > And at the very least, review your logs for the actual sizes of
                                > incoming messages, and see what usage dictates. I have a hunch it is
                                > going to be much lower than your current limit.
                                >
                                > Mvg,
                                > Joni
                                >



                                --
                                Sam Flint
                                flintfam.org/~swflint

                              • Saša Babić
                                ... Or FileSender: https://www.filesender.org/
                                Message 15 of 16 , Aug 9, 2013
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                                  On 07.08.2013. 15:08, LuKreme wrote:
                                  >
                                  > On 07 Aug 2013, at 06:37 , Patrick Lists <postfix-list@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  >> On 08/07/2013 12:03 PM, John Allen wrote:
                                  >> [snip]
                                  >>> Yes. We support a business that designs and manufactures packaging and
                                  >>> displays. The sort of thing you might see in the aisle of a supermarket
                                  >>> or store selling gum, personal care products. The graphics, art work
                                  >>> and design of these need to be sent to the people involved. We have
                                  >>> looked into using services like Dropbox but the problem with all of
                                  >>> these is copyright. Our customers legal eagles have advise against such
                                  >>> services as they may compromise their copyright on anything stored on
                                  >>> such services.
                                  >>>
                                  >>> OT: It is the same advice and reasoning they gave against using public
                                  >>> cloud services, some of whose terms of service essentially strip the
                                  >>> user of all copyright ownership.
                                  >>
                                  >> Maybe look into an on-premise dropbox alternative: http://owncloud.org/
                                  >
                                  > Or something like ShareFile.

                                  Or FileSender: https://www.filesender.org/
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