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Re: [OT] Non-interactive Debian (aptitude) install

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  • Glenn Park
    ... Woa, wait, so even if I choose No configuration in the GUI, my config may be overwritten? If I have to choose Internet site in order to be able to put
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 23, 2012
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      On Fri, Nov 23, 2012 at 10:02 PM, Scott Kitterman <postfix@...> wrote:
      > On Friday, November 23, 2012 09:29:08 PM Glenn Park wrote:
      >> On Fri, Nov 23, 2012 at 8:43 PM, Scott Kitterman <postfix@...>
      > wrote:
      >> > On Friday, November 23, 2012 07:55:57 PM Glenn Park wrote:
      >> >> Hello,
      >> >>
      >> >> When I install Postfix using aptitude on a fresh Debian system, an
      >> >> interactive GUI comes up asking me how it wants me to configure
      >> >> postfix. I'd like to suppress this interface and make it default to
      >> >> "No configuration" (I am automating the installation and have my own
      >> >> configuration files, thank you). However I can find nothing
      >> >> documented that allows me to do this. Can anyone help?
      >> >
      >> > There are some assumptions built into the way the postfix packaging
      >> > interact with debconf that make this a risky thing to do. See (Debian
      >> > and Ubuntu are the same in this regard):
      >> >
      >> > https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/postfix/+bug/1027061
      >>
      >> Pardon my lack of understanding here (I did read that whole
      >> conversation), but I'm a little hazy on what the problem is. What's
      >> the difference between giving a "No Configuration" answer ahead of
      >> time/by default and doing it with the GUI that is presented? But are
      >> you saying that it's impossible to suppress anyway?
      >>
      >> Rather, you seem to be suggesting that upon update, we may see our
      >> configuration changed out from under us? We are not using puppet or
      >> anything like that. Config is by hand.
      >
      > Yes. The postfix package is designed to be configured by the debconf (Debian
      > Configuration) system. If, in the internal status of the debconf system,
      > postfix is marked as "No configuration" via there being no status entry, so
      > there's currently no way to distinguish between "desired configuration is 'No
      > configuration'" and "Don't do anything, something else will handle it."
      >
      > I have not had time to research this issue. I expect it's reasonably
      > tractable to fix, but I don't know when I'll be able to get to it.
      >
      > What I usually do is pick "Internet site" and then modify things from there.
      > If you do that once, even if you copy your config files over the provided ones,
      > you won't have to worry about your changes getting reverted.

      Woa, wait, so even if I choose "No configuration" in the GUI, my
      config may be overwritten?

      If I have to choose "Internet site" in order to be able to put my own
      config files in place (and not have them overwritten), that's fine.
      But my question is how I can do that unattended?

      Thanks, Scott
    • Scott Kitterman
      ... I believe you can do this using preseeding. Preseeding is discussed in the context of a new system installation here:
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 24, 2012
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        On Friday, November 23, 2012 11:05:42 PM Glenn Park wrote:
        > On Fri, Nov 23, 2012 at 10:02 PM, Scott Kitterman <postfix@...>
        wrote:
        > > On Friday, November 23, 2012 09:29:08 PM Glenn Park wrote:
        > >> On Fri, Nov 23, 2012 at 8:43 PM, Scott Kitterman <postfix@...>
        > >
        > > wrote:
        > >> > On Friday, November 23, 2012 07:55:57 PM Glenn Park wrote:
        > >> >> Hello,
        > >> >>
        > >> >> When I install Postfix using aptitude on a fresh Debian system, an
        > >> >> interactive GUI comes up asking me how it wants me to configure
        > >> >> postfix. I'd like to suppress this interface and make it default to
        > >> >> "No configuration" (I am automating the installation and have my own
        > >> >> configuration files, thank you). However I can find nothing
        > >> >> documented that allows me to do this. Can anyone help?
        > >> >
        > >> > There are some assumptions built into the way the postfix packaging
        > >> > interact with debconf that make this a risky thing to do. See (Debian
        > >> > and Ubuntu are the same in this regard):
        > >> >
        > >> > https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/postfix/+bug/1027061
        > >>
        > >> Pardon my lack of understanding here (I did read that whole
        > >> conversation), but I'm a little hazy on what the problem is. What's
        > >> the difference between giving a "No Configuration" answer ahead of
        > >> time/by default and doing it with the GUI that is presented? But are
        > >> you saying that it's impossible to suppress anyway?
        > >>
        > >> Rather, you seem to be suggesting that upon update, we may see our
        > >> configuration changed out from under us? We are not using puppet or
        > >> anything like that. Config is by hand.
        > >
        > > Yes. The postfix package is designed to be configured by the debconf
        > > (Debian Configuration) system. If, in the internal status of the debconf
        > > system, postfix is marked as "No configuration" via there being no status
        > > entry, so there's currently no way to distinguish between "desired
        > > configuration is 'No configuration'" and "Don't do anything, something
        > > else will handle it."
        > >
        > > I have not had time to research this issue. I expect it's reasonably
        > > tractable to fix, but I don't know when I'll be able to get to it.
        > >
        > > What I usually do is pick "Internet site" and then modify things from
        > > there. If you do that once, even if you copy your config files over the
        > > provided ones, you won't have to worry about your changes getting
        > > reverted.
        >
        > Woa, wait, so even if I choose "No configuration" in the GUI, my
        > config may be overwritten?
        >
        > If I have to choose "Internet site" in order to be able to put my own
        > config files in place (and not have them overwritten), that's fine.
        > But my question is how I can do that unattended?

        I believe you can do this using preseeding. Preseeding is discussed in the
        context of a new system installation here:
        http://wiki.debian.org/DebianInstaller/Preseed

        Scott K
      • Glenn Park
        ... Thanks, Scott
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 24, 2012
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          On Sat, Nov 24, 2012 at 8:54 AM, Scott Kitterman <postfix@...> wrote:
          > On Friday, November 23, 2012 11:05:42 PM Glenn Park wrote:
          >> On Fri, Nov 23, 2012 at 10:02 PM, Scott Kitterman <postfix@...>
          > wrote:
          >> > On Friday, November 23, 2012 09:29:08 PM Glenn Park wrote:
          >> >> On Fri, Nov 23, 2012 at 8:43 PM, Scott Kitterman <postfix@...>
          >> >
          >> > wrote:
          >> >> > On Friday, November 23, 2012 07:55:57 PM Glenn Park wrote:
          >> >> >> Hello,
          >> >> >>
          >> >> >> When I install Postfix using aptitude on a fresh Debian system, an
          >> >> >> interactive GUI comes up asking me how it wants me to configure
          >> >> >> postfix. I'd like to suppress this interface and make it default to
          >> >> >> "No configuration" (I am automating the installation and have my own
          >> >> >> configuration files, thank you). However I can find nothing
          >> >> >> documented that allows me to do this. Can anyone help?
          >> >> >
          >> >> > There are some assumptions built into the way the postfix packaging
          >> >> > interact with debconf that make this a risky thing to do. See (Debian
          >> >> > and Ubuntu are the same in this regard):
          >> >> >
          >> >> > https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/postfix/+bug/1027061
          >> >>
          >> >> Pardon my lack of understanding here (I did read that whole
          >> >> conversation), but I'm a little hazy on what the problem is. What's
          >> >> the difference between giving a "No Configuration" answer ahead of
          >> >> time/by default and doing it with the GUI that is presented? But are
          >> >> you saying that it's impossible to suppress anyway?
          >> >>
          >> >> Rather, you seem to be suggesting that upon update, we may see our
          >> >> configuration changed out from under us? We are not using puppet or
          >> >> anything like that. Config is by hand.
          >> >
          >> > Yes. The postfix package is designed to be configured by the debconf
          >> > (Debian Configuration) system. If, in the internal status of the debconf
          >> > system, postfix is marked as "No configuration" via there being no status
          >> > entry, so there's currently no way to distinguish between "desired
          >> > configuration is 'No configuration'" and "Don't do anything, something
          >> > else will handle it."
          >> >
          >> > I have not had time to research this issue. I expect it's reasonably
          >> > tractable to fix, but I don't know when I'll be able to get to it.
          >> >
          >> > What I usually do is pick "Internet site" and then modify things from
          >> > there. If you do that once, even if you copy your config files over the
          >> > provided ones, you won't have to worry about your changes getting
          >> > reverted.
          >>
          >> Woa, wait, so even if I choose "No configuration" in the GUI, my
          >> config may be overwritten?
          >>
          >> If I have to choose "Internet site" in order to be able to put my own
          >> config files in place (and not have them overwritten), that's fine.
          >> But my question is how I can do that unattended?
          >
          > I believe you can do this using preseeding. Preseeding is discussed in the
          > context of a new system installation here:
          > http://wiki.debian.org/DebianInstaller/Preseed

          Thanks, Scott
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