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Re: A question about Postfix and virus scanning

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  • Wietse Venema
    ... I can assure you that there is no such caching the Postfix SMTP server before the SMTP-based content filter, and not in the Postfix SMTP server after the
    Message 1 of 32 , Dec 1, 2009
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      Stan Hoeppner:
      > Wietse Venema put forth on 12/1/2009 3:47 PM:
      >
      > > Surely, mail is injected via SMTP, and therefore, the Postfix SMTP
      > > server will attempt to lookup the client hostname and IP address;
      > > since they are using SMTP-based content filters, that is another
      > > source of name service lookups. All this presents a load on name
      > > service. I have seen enough to know that a bad DNS configuration
      > > can do wonders for performance.
      >
      > Assuming the test streams are generated by a handful of SPECmail load
      > generator hosts, the hostnames and addresses of those client machines
      > would quickly be cached, no?

      I can assure you that there is no such caching the Postfix SMTP
      server before the SMTP-based content filter, and not in the Postfix
      SMTP server after the SMTP-based content filter. In addition, Postfix
      and content filters may do other DNS lookups for reputation etc.

      Ideally, name/address/reputation lookups will have only minimal
      impact, but I was explicitly not talking about ideal configurations
      when I wrote:

      If your performance is inadequate, I suggest that you do a detailed
      system performance analysis to find out if the limit is CPU,
      memory, file I/O or perhaps some trivial DNS configuration problem.

      I would not be so quick to dismiss DNS-related problems out of hand
      in scenarios that involve synthetic email messages.

      Wietse
    • Seth Mattinen
      ... The difference is obvious: everyone loves to hate Microsoft and Google can do no wrong. Simple as that. ~Seth
      Message 32 of 32 , Dec 2, 2009
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        Jerry wrote:
        > On Wed, 02 Dec 2009 01:33:51 -0500
        > Michael Katz <mknews@...> replied:
        >
        >> Responding to support lists is not a sales strategy, and if it was it
        >> would be the worst strategy imaginable because it doesn't work. We
        >> sell software because we have to make a living but answering on lists
        >> is more of a personality trait of mine than anything else.
        >> Regardless, the open source vs. commercial argument is largely dying
        >> because the real argument, in the US at least, is becoming Google vs.
        >> anything else. Their free offerings are ending the need for Postfix,
        >> Amavis, what I make and countless other email products - commercial,
        >> open source or otherwise. Somehow we have all become addicted to the
        >> free stuff that billionairesgive us while spurning the hard work of a
        >> few entrepreneurs trying to make a living. We are a tiny little
        >> company and I answer stuff to try to be helpful, that's it. Save the
        >> cries of evil for people that matter like Google, we are insignificant
        >> unfortunately.
        >
        > IMHO, Google is employing the business method know as "deferred
        > gratification". It is so transparent that I find it hard to believe
        > that there has not been more chatter regarding its business dealings.
        > It appears that only now have some large corporations and government
        > entities started to take action against them. What really annoys me is
        > that when Microsoft lowered prices on some of its retail products they
        > were accused of using the same business tactic. When Google does
        > essentially the same thing, barely a word is spoken. Too many users have
        > become functionally socialist in regards to software.
        >

        The difference is obvious: everyone loves to hate Microsoft and Google
        can do no wrong. Simple as that.

        ~Seth
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