Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: anvil logging

Expand Messages
  • Wietse Venema
    ... No. Anvil logs something when it terminates (Postfix is not receiving mail), and it logs something every 10 minutes or so when Postfix is busy. ... That
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 1, 2008
      Mark Watts:
      > Is there a mechanism to reduce/stop the logging that anvil does?

      No. Anvil logs something when it terminates (Postfix is not receiving
      mail), and it logs something every 10 minutes or so when Postfix
      is busy.

      > I have a low-traffic mail server and I'd prefer anvil to not log anything if
      > possible.
      >
      > Am I limited to setting anvil_status_update_time to something high? (~1 week)

      That would suck up an insane amount of memory when you get
      hit by a backscatter wave.

      What is the problem that you are trying to solve and that could
      not be solved with grep(1)? Please describe the problem not the
      solution. Are you worried that the disk wears out, or that you are
      accelerating the thermodynamic death of the universe?

      Wietse
    • Mark Watts
      ... My problem can be solved by grep, but since anvil s statistics are of no immediate use to me, I see little point in filling my logs with them. Mark. --
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 1, 2008
        On Monday 01 September 2008 14:21:56 Wietse Venema wrote:
        > Mark Watts:
        > > Is there a mechanism to reduce/stop the logging that anvil does?
        >
        > No. Anvil logs something when it terminates (Postfix is not receiving
        > mail), and it logs something every 10 minutes or so when Postfix
        > is busy.
        >
        > > I have a low-traffic mail server and I'd prefer anvil to not log anything
        > > if possible.
        > >
        > > Am I limited to setting anvil_status_update_time to something high? (~1
        > > week)
        >
        > That would suck up an insane amount of memory when you get
        > hit by a backscatter wave.
        >
        > What is the problem that you are trying to solve and that could
        > not be solved with grep(1)? Please describe the problem not the
        > solution. Are you worried that the disk wears out, or that you are
        > accelerating the thermodynamic death of the universe?
        >
        > Wietse

        My "problem" can be solved by grep, but since anvil's statistics are of no
        immediate use to me, I see little point in filling my logs with them.

        Mark.

        --
        Mark Watts BSc RHCE MBCS
        Senior Systems Engineer
        QinetiQ Applied Technologies
        GPG Key: http://www.linux-corner.info/mwatts.gpg
      • Francisco Reyes
        ... Perhaps you could take a look at syslog-ng. I believe it is able to filter out lines based on expressions. Or pretty much any syslog with that
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 1, 2008
          Mark Watts writes:

          > My "problem" can be solved by grep, but since anvil's statistics are of no
          > immediate use to me, I see little point in filling my logs with them.

          Perhaps you could take a look at syslog-ng. I believe it is able to filter
          out lines based on expressions. Or pretty much any syslog with that
          capability.. I am only aware of syslog-ng, but others may do it too.
        • mouss
          ... These are not your logs. These are system logs. are you System ? :) you can have your log rotation program to remove what you don t want to keep. or as
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 1, 2008
            Mark Watts wrote:

            > My "problem" can be solved by grep, but since anvil's statistics are of no
            > immediate use to me, I see little point in filling my logs with them.


            These are not your logs. These are system logs. are you "System"? :)


            you can have your log rotation program to remove what you don't want to
            keep. or as suggested by Francisco, you could use syslog-ng.

            Logs may be useless when everything is as you want. but you regret their
            absence when troubleshooting...
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.