Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: symmetrical coils

Expand Messages
  • Pete B.
    Hi Jean-Yves, I will most likely use a single pipe engine when I do get to build my North River boat. It won t be to convince myself that it will steam a
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 26 3:49 AM
    • 0 Attachment

      Hi Jean-Yves,

      I will most likely use a single pipe engine when I do get to build my North River boat. It won't be to convince myself that it will steam a straight course or not.

      At this point I rely almost entirely on your expertise developed through experience and experimentation. I'm 64 and haven't used a pop-pop in 50+ years. All of my present work on pop-pops is in my head and on the sketch pad (CAD). I hope to build some time soon.

      I got reaquainted with the little boats as a result of organizing a Reunion for my elementary school class of 1957. One of my classmates that I have reconnected with is the one that shared playing with the pop-pops in the late 50's. I am also working on documenting Fulton's North River steamboat. I can't remember which; Frank found me or I found Frank. Anyway, I joined in Frank's enthusiam and decided to combine my two interests and try to design and build a North River (Clermont) pop-pop.

      The design of my boat lends to a more stable course than some based on your comments. It is 16" long, 2.625" wide and on the heavier side. It's going to be mostly, if not all, copper and brass for display reasons. The build process is taking longer than I want but other commitments and working full time seem to slow things down. I'll keep you posted as things progress.

      Thanks for your comments. As always I appreciate you and others sharing your knowledge. We learn from each other!

      Pete


      --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "Jean-Yves Renaud" <boite.de.j-y@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Pete,
      > The fact the boats are sailing according to a curved course is not
      > only due to a dyssymmetry of the pipes or engine. It is mainly due to
      > the fact they have a very bad course stability. There are several
      > reasons: they move very slowly, they are short and generally not very
      > thin, and they have a very light displacement i.e. a light inertia
      > according to a vertical axis. To be convinced, use a single pipe
      > engine.
      > Jean-Yves

    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.