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Re: Tony - meths lamps, wick tubes, Parasene torches

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  • Frank McNeill
    Hi All, Has anyone (or two) ever used a water torch for any purpose? If you know what it is, ask Mr. Google for the details. Older than Dirt, Frank
    Message 1 of 33 , Nov 5, 2011
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      Hi All,
      Has anyone (or two) ever used a water torch for any purpose? If you know what it is, ask Mr. Google for the details.

      Older than Dirt, Frank

      --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "David Halfpenny \(y\)" <david.halfpenny@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > --------------------------------------------------
      > From: "zoomkat" <Zoomkat@...>
      > Sent: Saturday, November 05, 2011 3:17 PM
      > To: <pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com>
      > Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats] Re: Tony - meths lamps, wick tubes, Parasene
      > torches
      >
      > >
      > > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "David Halfpenny \(y\)"
      > > <david.halfpenny@> wrote:
      > >> All these options are excellent for soldering and silver-brazing, and
      > >> the
      > >> differences between them are purely matters of convenience.
      > >
      > > There seems to be confusion creeping in between firing a boiler and
      > > making a boiler. As far as constructing a boiler, there is a world of
      > > difference between soldering and true silver brazing. Silver brazing
      > > requires a high temperature torch capable of heating the material to at
      > > least 1300 deg. F., higher than the capability of the typical soldering
      > > torch.
      > >
      >
      > A typical plumber's blowlamp is only intended for soft soldering, but if it
      > can give a blue flame with a pale blue inner cone it is hot enough for
      > silver brazing. How big a piece it will braze depends on the size of the
      > flame. The hottest part of the flame (as you'll know but others may not) is
      > just beyond the blue cone.
      >
      > The Go System torches are all labelled with the flame temperature they can
      > reach.
      > The lowest is 1300C (not F).
      >
      > http://www.go-system.co.uk/media/gosystem/brochures/GoSystem-Professional-and-DIY.pdf
      >
      > David 1/2d
      >
    • mike.recycle
      ... Thanks, for a tiny leak that s a good idea, if I cannot fix the leak completely. ... I suspected the can itself too but it passed the underwater test. Mike
      Message 33 of 33 , Nov 11, 2011
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        --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "David Halfpenny \(y\)" <david.halfpenny@...> wrote:
        >
        > . . . . Just fit the torch to the can, get the job done and then store your torch
        > OFF the can and you'll be OK.

        Thanks, for a tiny leak that's a good idea, if I cannot fix the leak completely.

        > If a can bubbles under water on its own, then I'm less sure about that.

        I suspected the can itself too but it passed the underwater test.

        Mike
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