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David - Intermediate heat source?

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  • mike.recycle
    Wow, thanks for all that David, I m a total beginner with these things, being more familiar with wood, plywood and epoxy. The links work fine but the first pic
    Message 1 of 32 , Oct 27, 2011
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      Wow, thanks for all that David, I'm a total beginner with these things, being more familiar with wood, plywood and epoxy.

      The links work fine but the first pic (classic Mamod burner) is not showing, how can I get it please?

      Mike

      --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "David Halfpenny \(y\)" <david.halfpenny@...> wrote:

      > . . . . Here's a reproduction of a classic Mamod burner. There's some kind of wadding under the gauze so that meths doesn't slop out when the burner moves. Construction doesn't get easier than that. . . .
      >
      >
      > >
      > > A meths burner could maybe include a top-up funnel.
      >
      > Not a funnel - HUGE danger of flare-up - but a chicken feed.
      >
      > Chicken feed allows you to have a large meths tank way above the burner sump. Here's a diagram to get you started:
      >
      > http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i126/Andrex_photos/chicken.jpg
      >
      > and here's a historic drawing showing a very low burner:
      >
      > http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n316/tmuir1/chickenfeed.jpg
      >
      > Use the modern type of tank and you're home.
      >
      > The tank is airtight so no fuel can get out unless air can get in. The meths in the sump blocks the only air inlet. Only when the meths in the sump runs low can a bubble of air get into the tank from below, allowing a similar volume of meths to drop into the sump to replenish it.
      >
      > Google for clearer images
      >
      > This Youtube video shows a large tank high above a large low tray burner.
      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XYf7S0SS7K4
      >
      > He's not got it right yet because he hasn't really understood, but it shows how low a tray burner with chick feed can be and still have a long-duration tank.
      >
      > Finally, suppose you do want to go for conventional wicks.
      > Here's a classic exposition of how wicks regulate fuel supply:
      > http://www.roundhouse-eng.com/spirit.htm
      > You're better off to understand those principles before spending time trying to reinvent the wheel.
      >
      > For wick material, do NOT use asbestos wick unless you understand how to stay safe or don't expect to live more than 30 years hence.
      > Ordinary cotton string is too varied a product these days to be much help. If your burner design calls for cotton use proper candlewicks from a candle-making shop.
      >
      > Here's a thread from a train forum discussing lots of options.
      > http://www.mylargescale.com/Community/Forums/tabid/56/afv/topic/aff/11/aft/63307/Default.aspx
      > I use the Ultimate Wick mentioned or ordinary steel wool. Others roll up fine stainless mesh.
      >
      > David 1/2d
      >
    • mike.recycle
      No Daryl, I had not found it, thanks! I ve now put these 2 links in my pop-pop bookmarks folder. So much great information is coming in via this thread that I
      Message 32 of 32 , Oct 29, 2011
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        No Daryl, I had not found it, thanks! I've now put these 2 links in my pop-pop bookmarks folder.

        So much great information is coming in via this thread that I am having difficulty in keeping up with it all! Very helpful.

        Mike

        --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "Daryl" <darylcanada73@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Mike, Did you find the Mamod site yet? Two links below will take you to pertinent threads about pop pop stuff and lots of info on burners of every kind in the Tech help thread section.
        >
        >
        > http://modelsteam.myfreeforum.org/Putt_Putt_Boats_amp_Engines_Talk_Build_Tips_amp_How_To_about40752.html
        >
        >
        > http://modelsteam.myfreeforum.org/ftopic29385-0-asc-0.php
        >
        >
        > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "mike.recycle" <mike.recycle@> wrote:
        > >
        > > A great example of that would be Slater Harrison's anyone-can-make-it design with soda can alu, 2 drinking straws and ordinary 5-minute epoxy (and 5-minute epoxy probably has less heat resistance than slower epoxy). Until I watched his videos, I would not have believed this was possible. The drinks carton hulls are clever, too - good power/weight ratio and a "lively" character. Fast and loud!
        > >
        > > Mike
        > >
        >
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