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Fwd: Re: [pop-pop-steamboats] Re: Easy putt putt engine build.

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  • Don & Marsha Munsey Jr
    Zoomkat, Just curious, would the slow setting version of */JB Weld/* make a joint that could tolerate the heat load required for our smaller boats? What do
    Message 1 of 3 , May 29, 2011
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       Zoomkat,

      Just curious, would the slow setting version of JB Weld make a joint that could tolerate the heat load required for our smaller boats?  What do you think?  What about JB Kwik?

      fmg aka Don Munsey, Jr
      Living in the UpperRightCorner of Louisiana, USA

      On 5/26/2011 11:25 PM, zoomkat wrote:
       

      Interesting engines. The challange for the casual builder is making the high temperature joints that won't fail when the boiler heats up. I've tried soldering can tops and pie pans together for flat boilers, but the solder eventually gets soft and fails. I got out my mapp gas torch and mapp/oxy torch (like below) from many years ago and started testing with brass brazing rods. The mapp gas torch can heat up a piece of yard edging metal to orange heat at which point the brazing rod will liquify and flow as a liquid (~1600 deg F). When I get time I'm going to try to braze the lids and pans to see if the mapp brazing is an ~inexpensive alternative to the more costly gas rigs.

      http://www.tractorsupply.com/welding-metalworking/welding-accessories-parts/welding-magnets/quickfire-cutting-and-welding-torch-kit-3840158

      http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=Bernzomatic+mapp&hl=en&num=100&lr=&cr=&safe=images&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=562061308235340798&sa=X&ei=nh_fTahPyaO2B9qowPsJ&ved=0CFAQ8wIwBQ#

      --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "Daryl" <darylcanada73@...> wrote:
      >
      > This really is easy to build and performs well. Any comments appreciated.
      >
      > <iframe width="480" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/NNkZACnaDSQ?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
      >

    • Donald Qualls
      ... JB Kwik, definitely not. I doubt the regular JB Weld would stand up, either, if the boiler gets hot enough to soften regular tin-lead solder. JB Weld is
      Message 2 of 3 , May 29, 2011
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        Don & Marsha Munsey Jr wrote:
        >
        >
        > Zoomkat,
        >
        > Just curious, would the slow setting version of */JB Weld/* make a joint
        > that could tolerate the heat load required for our smaller boats? What
        > do you think? What about */JB Kwik/*?
        >

        JB Kwik, definitely not. I doubt the regular JB Weld would stand up,
        either, if the boiler gets hot enough to soften regular tin-lead solder.
        JB Weld is just epoxy will a powdered metal filler; if the resin
        softens, the filler won't help -- and I've never heard of an epoxy that
        will hold up above about 400º F (common soft solder melts at around
        460º, pure tin plumbing solder a little higher).

        --
        If, through hard work and perseverance, you finally get what you want,
        it's probably a sign you weren't dreaming big enough.

        Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer http://silent1.home.netcom.com

        Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
        and don't expect them to be perfect.
      • zoomkat
        ... Epoxy can be used on some types of engines such as the sciencetoymaker engines that are made of very thin aluminum. I ve also seen an engine made from the
        Message 3 of 3 , May 30, 2011
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          --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, Don & Marsha Munsey Jr <dmunseyjr@...> wrote:
          >
          > Zoomkat,
          >
          > Just curious, would the slow setting version of */JB Weld/* make a joint
          > that could tolerate the heat load required for our smaller boats? What
          > do you think? What about */JB Kwik/*?
          >

          Epoxy can be used on some types of engines such as the sciencetoymaker engines that are made of very thin aluminum. I've also seen an engine made from the rounded bottom of an aluminum drink can glued with epoxy. Being creative with thin aluminum has some possibilitys. I've made the engine below from can lids and JBWeld, but the steel transfers heat to the epoxied parts and they got weak when the engine overheated

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboats/photos/album/1755869487/pic/600956926/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&count=20&dir=asc
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