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A new fiberglass hull

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  • charleswclarke@netscape.net
    As I mentioned previously, I built my first pop-pop boat a few weeks ago. The engine was a diaphragm type, and the hull was made form a lightweight oval
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 27, 2010
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      As I mentioned previously, I built my first pop-pop boat a few weeks ago. The engine was a diaphragm type, and the hull was made form a lightweight oval plastic food container. I made a second boat with a similar hull, but it has a coil type engine. They both run well.

      Finally, I decided that I wanted to make a traditional fantail launch hull out of fiberglass. My approach was to start with florist foam. This foam which is used to make floral arrangements is very, very soft. You can literally dent it with a light touch of your finger. The good news is that the hull can be quickly shaped with just a knife and a piece of sandpaper. The surface can then be smoothed out by rubbing the foam with your index finger. My design duplicated some drawings that I had. Next, I used several pieces of fiberglass cloth and epoxy resin to completely coat the hull and the deck. When it was fully cured, I cut several large holes in the deck and joined them to create the cockpit area. The foam was then scraped out, and a fiberglass shell was left. It took a bit of effort to smooth the exterior. The final surface was painted. This boat has a fixed boiler engine design. When I get a working digital camera, I will post some pictures.
    • Pete
      I seem to remember an article back in the late 60 s on making fiberglas wings with the same process. If memory serves me the removing of the foam was done with
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 28, 2010
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        I seem to remember an article back in the late 60's on making fiberglas wings with the same process. If memory serves me the removing of the foam was done with a chemical, possibly acetone similar to nail polish remover. It desolved the foam and was easily poured from the fiberglas shell. Not very GREEN by today's standards.

        I'll be looking for those photos.

        Pete

        --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, charleswclarke@... wrote:
        >
        > As I mentioned previously, I built my first pop-pop boat a few weeks ago. The engine was a diaphragm type, and the hull was made form a lightweight oval plastic food container. I made a second boat with a similar hull, but it has a coil type engine. They both run well.
        >
        > Finally, I decided that I wanted to make a traditional fantail launch hull out of fiberglass. My approach was to start with florist foam. This foam which is used to make floral arrangements is very, very soft. You can literally dent it with a light touch of your finger. The good news is that the hull can be quickly shaped with just a knife and a piece of sandpaper. The surface can then be smoothed out by rubbing the foam with your index finger. My design duplicated some drawings that I had. Next, I used several pieces of fiberglass cloth and epoxy resin to completely coat the hull and the deck. When it was fully cured, I cut several large holes in the deck and joined them to create the cockpit area. The foam was then scraped out, and a fiberglass shell was left. It took a bit of effort to smooth the exterior. The final surface was painted. This boat has a fixed boiler engine design. When I get a working digital camera, I will post some pictures.
        >
      • Rob Wood
        Gasoline was the solvent of choice for that. Makes a very interesting mess, but works beautifully. Rob ... -- Rob Wood /Special Projects Director/ HyperGold
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 28, 2010
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          Gasoline was the solvent of choice for that. Makes a very interesting mess, but works beautifully.

          Rob

          On 7/28/2010 4:17 AM, Pete wrote:
           



          I seem to remember an article back in the late 60's on making fiberglas wings with the same process. If memory serves me the removing of the foam was done with a chemical, possibly acetone similar to nail polish remover. It desolved the foam and was easily poured from the fiberglas shell. Not very GREEN by today's standards.

          I'll be looking for those photos.

          Pete

          --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, charleswclarke@... wrote:
          >
          > As I mentioned previously, I built my first pop-pop boat a few weeks ago. The engine was a diaphragm type, and the hull was made form a lightweight oval plastic food container. I made a second boat with a similar hull, but it has a coil type engine. They both run well.
          >
          > Finally, I decided that I wanted to make a traditional fantail launch hull out of fiberglass. My approach was to start with florist foam. This foam which is used to make floral arrangements is very, very soft. You can literally dent it with a light touch of your finger. The good news is that the hull can be quickly shaped with just a knife and a piece of sandpaper. The surface can then be smoothed out by rubbing the foam with your index finger. My design duplicated some drawings that I had. Next, I used several pieces of fiberglass cloth and epoxy resin to completely coat the hull and the deck. When it was fully cured, I cut several large holes in the deck and joined them to create the cockpit area. The foam was then scraped out, and a fiberglass shell was left. It took a bit of effort to smooth the exterior. The final surface was painted. This boat has a fixed boiler engine design. When I get a working digital camera, I will post some pictures.
          >



          --
          Rob Wood
          Special Projects Director
          HyperGold Web Services
          650-756-2214
          email: rwood@...


        • David Halfpenny (t)
          From: Rob Wood Sent: Thursday, July 29, 2010 12:23 AM To: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com Subject: Re: [pop-pop-steamboats] Re: A new fiberglass hull
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 29, 2010
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            From: Rob Wood
            Sent: Thursday, July 29, 2010 12:23 AM
            Subject: Re: [pop-pop-steamboats] Re: A new fiberglass hull

            Gasoline was the solvent of choice for that. Makes a very interesting mess, but works beautifully.

            Very, very dangerous!
             
            David 1/2d
          • frankmcneilll
            So I smile and say when a lovely flame dies, smoke gets in your eyes. Old Frank
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 29, 2010
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              So I smile and say when a lovely flame dies, smoke gets in your eyes.
              Old Frank

              --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "David Halfpenny \(t\)" <tuppenced@...> wrote:
              >
              > From: Rob Wood
              > Sent: Thursday, July 29, 2010 12:23 AM
              > To: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: Re: [pop-pop-steamboats] Re: A new fiberglass hull
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Gasoline was the solvent of choice for that. Makes a very interesting mess, but works beautifully.
              >
              >
              > Very, very dangerous!
              >
              > David 1/2d
              >
            • Pete
              interesting! Gasoline was certainly cheaper than acetone back then. My friend who was an experimental aircraft nut used something other than gasoline. He also
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 29, 2010
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                interesting! Gasoline was certainly cheaper than acetone back then. My friend who was an experimental aircraft nut used something other than gasoline. He also had enough common sense to do the desolving outside.

                Pete

                --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, Rob Wood <rwood@...> wrote:
                >
                > Gasoline was the solvent of choice for that. Makes a very interesting
                > mess, but works beautifully.
                >
                > Rob
                >
                > On 7/28/2010 4:17 AM, Pete wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > I seem to remember an article back in the late 60's on making
                > > fiberglas wings with the same process. If memory serves me the
                > > removing of the foam was done with a chemical, possibly acetone
                > > similar to nail polish remover. It desolved the foam and was easily
                > > poured from the fiberglas shell. Not very GREEN by today's standards.
                > >
                > > I'll be looking for those photos.
                > >
                > > Pete
                > >
                > > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com
                > > <mailto:pop-pop-steamboats%40yahoogroups.com>, charleswclarke@ wrote:
                > > >
                > > > As I mentioned previously, I built my first pop-pop boat a few weeks
                > > ago. The engine was a diaphragm type, and the hull was made form a
                > > lightweight oval plastic food container. I made a second boat with a
                > > similar hull, but it has a coil type engine. They both run well.
                > > >
                > > > Finally, I decided that I wanted to make a traditional fantail
                > > launch hull out of fiberglass. My approach was to start with florist
                > > foam. This foam which is used to make floral arrangements is very,
                > > very soft. You can literally dent it with a light touch of your
                > > finger. The good news is that the hull can be quickly shaped with just
                > > a knife and a piece of sandpaper. The surface can then be smoothed out
                > > by rubbing the foam with your index finger. My design duplicated some
                > > drawings that I had. Next, I used several pieces of fiberglass cloth
                > > and epoxy resin to completely coat the hull and the deck. When it was
                > > fully cured, I cut several large holes in the deck and joined them to
                > > create the cockpit area. The foam was then scraped out, and a
                > > fiberglass shell was left. It took a bit of effort to smooth the
                > > exterior. The final surface was painted. This boat has a fixed boiler
                > > engine design. When I get a working digital camera, I will post some
                > > pictures.
                > > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                > --
                > Rob Wood
                > /Special Projects Director/
                > HyperGold Web Services <http://www.hypergold.com>
                > 650-756-2214
                > email: rwood@... <mailto:rwood@...>
                >
              • charleswclarke@netscape.net
                Well, I just bought two more pieces of florist foam. I don t yet know what type of boat is inside. For inspiration, I think I will look through some old
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 30, 2010
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                  Well, I just bought two more pieces of florist foam. I don't yet know what type of boat is inside. For inspiration, I think I will look through some old Rudder magazines from the 1930's. Maybe I will make something that looks like an old Elco or Wheeler.

                  When I am nearly done, maybe I will try using some solvent to get the very last bit of foam out the hull. We'll see...
                • Pete
                  Charles, It s interesting that you mention ELCO. A friend, Chuck Houghton, was Elso s CEO a few years ago. He has since moved on. They made PT boats and
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jul 30, 2010
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                    Charles,

                    It's interesting that you mention ELCO. A friend, Chuck Houghton, was Elso's CEO a few years ago. He has since moved on. They made PT boats and launches in the earlier days. They have been reborn and now make electric launches. Beautiful boats but way too pricey for my blood.

                    http://www.elcomotoryachts.com/

                    Keep us posted...with pix.

                    Pete

                    --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, charleswclarke@... wrote:
                    >
                    > Well, I just bought two more pieces of florist foam. I don't yet know what type of boat is inside. For inspiration, I think I will look through some old Rudder magazines from the 1930's. Maybe I will make something that looks like an old Elco or Wheeler.
                    >
                    > When I am nearly done, maybe I will try using some solvent to get the very last bit of foam out the hull. We'll see...
                    >
                  • charleswclarke@netscape.net
                    Pete, Those new Elco s are indeed pretty. I have always admired the original Elco s, and it is really nice to see that the tradition continues. Hopefully, my
                    Message 9 of 11 , Aug 1, 2010
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                      Pete,
                      Those new Elco's are indeed pretty. I have always admired the original Elco's, and it is really nice to see that the tradition continues. Hopefully, my somewhat crude fiberglass scale replica will capture at least some of the grace of the Elco design.
                      Charles

                      --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "Pete" <georgeyyy@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Charles,
                      >
                      > It's interesting that you mention ELCO. A friend, Chuck Houghton, was Elso's CEO a few years ago. He has since moved on. They made PT boats and launches in the earlier days. They have been reborn and now make electric launches. Beautiful boats but way too pricey for my blood.
                      >
                      > http://www.elcomotoryachts.com/
                      >
                      > Keep us posted...with pix.
                      >
                      > Pete
                      >
                      > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, charleswclarke@ wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Well, I just bought two more pieces of florist foam. I don't yet know what type of boat is inside. For inspiration, I think I will look through some old Rudder magazines from the 1930's. Maybe I will make something that looks like an old Elco or Wheeler.
                      > >
                      > > When I am nearly done, maybe I will try using some solvent to get the very last bit of foam out the hull. We'll see...
                      > >
                      >
                    • zoomkat
                      ... If you have a hull mold, you may want to look at vacuum forming plastic hulls. Search youtube for vacuum form for a lot of DIY setups. I ve tinkered with
                      Message 10 of 11 , Aug 1, 2010
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                        --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, charleswclarke@... wrote:
                        >
                        > Pete,
                        > Those new Elco's are indeed pretty. I have always admired the original Elco's, and it is really nice to see that the tradition continues. Hopefully, my somewhat crude fiberglass scale replica will capture at least some of the grace of the Elco design.
                        > Charles

                        If you have a hull mold, you may want to look at vacuum forming plastic hulls. Search youtube for "vacuum form" for a lot of DIY setups. I've tinkered with vacuum forming small objects using disposable plastic picnic plates for the plastic.
                      • charleswclarke@netscape.net
                        Thanks for your vacuuming forming suggestion. I have always wanted to give that a try.
                        Message 11 of 11 , Aug 2, 2010
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                          Thanks for your vacuuming forming suggestion. I have always wanted to give that a try.

                          > If you have a hull mold, you may want to look at vacuum forming plastic hulls. Search youtube for "vacuum form" for a lot of DIY setups. I've tinkered with vacuum forming small objects using disposable plastic picnic plates for the plastic.
                          >
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