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Re: Engine Design?

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  • jeanyves_renaud
    Hi Ted. I fully agree with Frank s answer. In addition, and to answer your last question, there is no limit in the number of pipes and it looks like there is
    Message 1 of 4 , May 28, 2010
      Hi Ted.
      I fully agree with Frank's answer.
      In addition, and to answer your last question, there is no limit in the number of pipes and it looks like there is no limit in the size. I ran engines with pipes ID up to 40mm and Jorn and Eljoh built one with 60mm.
      BUT big engines are not powerful. The thrust doesn't increase as fast as the size (and far less than the weight). Furthermore, in big engines the water velocity is less than the one in small engines.
      Therefore, multiplepipe engines are to be prefered. See Daryl's photo album. He is an expert in mulpiplepipe engines.
      Jean-Yves


      --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "theo570" <theo570@...> wrote:
      >
      > Frank,
      >
      > Thanks for the info. I wish I would of had that over the winter, it would have saved some frustration.
      >
      > Can you share the min and max pipe diameters for both the single tube and double tube engines?
      >
      >
      > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "frankmcneilll" <frankmcneilll@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Daryl is our resident expert but I think he will agree with me that contrary to what you might read in the Pop-Pop Pages and elsewhere the only contribution that expanding top makes is the pop-pop sound of an internal combustion engine. Replacing the expanding top with a rigid top would pay off by providing a bit more thrust. Engines with small diameter tubes require two tubes because the surface tension of water makes filling a single tube difficult or impossible. Engines with larger tubes do not have this problem. One possible reason why your engine did not work is that your burner provided too much heat or not enough. There is a fine balance between heating to generate a bit of steam and cooling to generate a partial vacuum that draws water back in to maintain continuous heating and cooling cycles. Trouble shooting steam engines with no moving parts is probably harder than it is for engines with pistons, crankshafts and valves. If you want a simple engine that runs well and lasts forever learn how to live without the pop.
      > >
      > > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "theo570" <theo570@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Could someone kindly tell me if there is a necessary relationship between boiler volume and suface area of the expanding top? This question stems from an engine I built over the winter that just wont work.
      > > >
      > > > Also, I am a wee bit confused. I see some designs, which match my boats, that have two pipes coming from the boiler and then some designs that have a single pipe... How does the single pipe engine work? Does it still pop? Gotta have the pop lol.
      > > >
      > > > Thank you,
      > > > Ted
      > > >
      > >
      >
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