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Re: easy chambers?

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  • frankmcneilll
    In files look for a folder titled Pofpof plano with information about the use of a flattened tube. Daryl has used a hollow brass doorknob for a boiler and
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 22, 2010
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      In files look for a folder titled Pofpof plano with information about the use of a flattened tube. Daryl has used a hollow brass doorknob for a boiler and Jean-Yves has experimented with boilers made from glass tubes.

      --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "HalbertL" <hal_ida@...> wrote:
      >
      > I was thinking about different sources for boilers that might not necessarily be outstanding for weight but just a little less work to seal off. Has anyone tried starting with a cigar tube or 5.56mm (.223) ammunition casings? I bet there are a couple of members here that have used a cigar tube as an above water steam jet. I am not sure what the cross section of a spent asthma inhaler or CO2 cartridge looks like or if it would be more work added than saved to try to use one of these.
      >
      > I realize many people stick to coils and don't have to worry much about leaks.
      >
    • steelbutcher
      Hello, I once tried making a single tube boiler using .223 brass. With the use of a 7mm TCU die and reloading press, I was able to enlarge the case so that
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 22, 2010
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        Hello, I once tried making a single tube boiler using .223 brass. With the use of a 7mm TCU die and reloading press, I was able to enlarge the case so that it accepted readily available copper tubing. I also tried turning down the OD of copper tubing on a small lathe so that the tube could be inserted into the brass case for soldering. The primer socket was threaded to accept a machine screw to aid in filling the boiler and in sealing the chamber. My results were promising. Other interests following a move kept me from pursuing it further. I must look into it again. I still catch myself thinking about other ways of building a boiler. The cigar case idea sounds great. Hmm, I need to go out into the shop again now that the weather is getting better. Good luck. Speaking of soldering, are there any other "ham" radio operators in this group?


        --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "HalbertL" <hal_ida@...> wrote:
        >
        > I was thinking about different sources for boilers that might not necessarily be outstanding for weight but just a little less work to seal off. Has anyone tried starting with a cigar tube or 5.56mm (.223) ammunition casings? I bet there are a couple of members here that have used a cigar tube as an above water steam jet. I am not sure what the cross section of a spent asthma inhaler or CO2 cartridge looks like or if it would be more work added than saved to try to use one of these.
        >
        > I realize many people stick to coils and don't have to worry much about leaks.
        >
      • steelbutcher
        I knew this would happen. You got me to thinking back to where I left off in my experiments and remember wanting to try using a 20 caliber casing like the
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 22, 2010
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          I knew this would happen. You got me to thinking back to where I left off in my experiments and remember wanting to try using a 20 caliber casing like the Ruger 204. Solid copper tubing could easily be drilled out for easy soldering to a brass or copper hobbyist tube. The rod could then be turned down to fit snugly into a sized case for soldering. The operative word in your quest was "easy" boiler. A little light machining and thread tapping is easy enough for me, but not everyone has access to a lathe. Mine is a hobbyist model made by Shereline. I'm just thinking out loud...

          Don

          --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "steelbutcher" <N61W160@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Hello, I once tried making a single tube boiler using .223 brass. With the use of a 7mm TCU die and reloading press, I was able to enlarge the case so that it accepted readily available copper tubing. I also tried turning down the OD of copper tubing on a small lathe so that the tube could be inserted into the brass case for soldering. The primer socket was threaded to accept a machine screw to aid in filling the boiler and in sealing the chamber. My results were promising. Other interests following a move kept me from pursuing it further. I must look into it again. I still catch myself thinking about other ways of building a boiler. The cigar case idea sounds great. Hmm, I need to go out into the shop again now that the weather is getting better. Good luck. Speaking of soldering, are there any other "ham" radio operators in this group?
          >
          >
          > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "HalbertL" <hal_ida@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I was thinking about different sources for boilers that might not necessarily be outstanding for weight but just a little less work to seal off. Has anyone tried starting with a cigar tube or 5.56mm (.223) ammunition casings? I bet there are a couple of members here that have used a cigar tube as an above water steam jet. I am not sure what the cross section of a spent asthma inhaler or CO2 cartridge looks like or if it would be more work added than saved to try to use one of these.
          > >
          > > I realize many people stick to coils and don't have to worry much about leaks.
          > >
          >
        • steelbutcher
          To avoid confusion, drill out copper or brass rod, not tubing. My recommendation would be to use brass. It just machines easier than copper and hobbyist
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 22, 2010
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            To avoid confusion, drill out copper or brass rod, not tubing. My recommendation would be to use brass. It just machines easier than copper and hobbyist tubing is available in a number of sizes. The sizing is such that the OD of a tube will just fit into the ID of the next larger tube. You could easily tweak the tube size with very little effort, but then again, 204 Ruger brass is cheap enough to start again.

            --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "steelbutcher" <N61W160@...> wrote:
            >
            > I knew this would happen. You got me to thinking back to where I left off in my experiments and remember wanting to try using a 20 caliber casing like the Ruger 204. Solid copper tubing could easily be drilled out for easy soldering to a brass or copper hobbyist tube. The rod could then be turned down to fit snugly into a sized case for soldering. The operative word in your quest was "easy" boiler. A little light machining and thread tapping is easy enough for me, but not everyone has access to a lathe. Mine is a hobbyist model made by Shereline. I'm just thinking out loud...
            >
            > Don
            >
            > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "steelbutcher" <N61W160@> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Hello, I once tried making a single tube boiler using .223 brass. With the use of a 7mm TCU die and reloading press, I was able to enlarge the case so that it accepted readily available copper tubing. I also tried turning down the OD of copper tubing on a small lathe so that the tube could be inserted into the brass case for soldering. The primer socket was threaded to accept a machine screw to aid in filling the boiler and in sealing the chamber. My results were promising. Other interests following a move kept me from pursuing it further. I must look into it again. I still catch myself thinking about other ways of building a boiler. The cigar case idea sounds great. Hmm, I need to go out into the shop again now that the weather is getting better. Good luck. Speaking of soldering, are there any other "ham" radio operators in this group?
            > >
            > >
            > > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "HalbertL" <hal_ida@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > I was thinking about different sources for boilers that might not necessarily be outstanding for weight but just a little less work to seal off. Has anyone tried starting with a cigar tube or 5.56mm (.223) ammunition casings? I bet there are a couple of members here that have used a cigar tube as an above water steam jet. I am not sure what the cross section of a spent asthma inhaler or CO2 cartridge looks like or if it would be more work added than saved to try to use one of these.
            > > >
            > > > I realize many people stick to coils and don't have to worry much about leaks.
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • HalbertL
            Thanks for the reply. Good stuff. I m guessing maybe you ve also made a wildcat or two--just a hunch.
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 24, 2010
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              Thanks for the reply. Good stuff. I'm guessing maybe you've also made a wildcat or two--just a hunch.

              --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "steelbutcher" <N61W160@...> wrote:
              >
              > To avoid confusion, drill out copper or brass rod, not tubing. My recommendation would be to use brass. It just machines easier than copper and hobbyist tubing is available in a number of sizes. The sizing is such that the OD of a tube will just fit into the ID of the next larger tube. You could easily tweak the tube size with very little effort, but then again, 204 Ruger brass is cheap enough to start again.
              >
              > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "steelbutcher" <N61W160@> wrote:
              > >
              > > I knew this would happen. You got me to thinking back to where I left off in my experiments and remember wanting to try using a 20 caliber casing like the Ruger 204. Solid copper tubing could easily be drilled out for easy soldering to a brass or copper hobbyist tube. The rod could then be turned down to fit snugly into a sized case for soldering. The operative word in your quest was "easy" boiler. A little light machining and thread tapping is easy enough for me, but not everyone has access to a lathe. Mine is a hobbyist model made by Shereline. I'm just thinking out loud...
              > >
              > > Don
              > >
              > > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "steelbutcher" <N61W160@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > Hello, I once tried making a single tube boiler using .223 brass. With the use of a 7mm TCU die and reloading press, I was able to enlarge the case so that it accepted readily available copper tubing. I also tried turning down the OD of copper tubing on a small lathe so that the tube could be inserted into the brass case for soldering. The primer socket was threaded to accept a machine screw to aid in filling the boiler and in sealing the chamber. My results were promising. Other interests following a move kept me from pursuing it further. I must look into it again. I still catch myself thinking about other ways of building a boiler. The cigar case idea sounds great. Hmm, I need to go out into the shop again now that the weather is getting better. Good luck. Speaking of soldering, are there any other "ham" radio operators in this group?
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "HalbertL" <hal_ida@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > I was thinking about different sources for boilers that might not necessarily be outstanding for weight but just a little less work to seal off. Has anyone tried starting with a cigar tube or 5.56mm (.223) ammunition casings? I bet there are a couple of members here that have used a cigar tube as an above water steam jet. I am not sure what the cross section of a spent asthma inhaler or CO2 cartridge looks like or if it would be more work added than saved to try to use one of these.
              > > > >
              > > > > I realize many people stick to coils and don't have to worry much about leaks.
              > > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • HalbertL
              Thanks for the reply. Flattened tube--even simpler and less work. I never thought of that. And for cigar tubes I won t have to worry about getting the aluminum
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 24, 2010
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                Thanks for the reply. Flattened tube--even simpler and less work. I never thought of that. And for cigar tubes I won't have to worry about getting the aluminum to accept regular solder.

                --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "frankmcneilll" <frankmcneilll@...> wrote:
                >
                > In files look for a folder titled Pofpof plano with information about the use of a flattened tube. Daryl has used a hollow brass doorknob for a boiler and Jean-Yves has experimented with boilers made from glass tubes.
                >
                > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "HalbertL" <hal_ida@> wrote:
                > >
                > > I was thinking about different sources for boilers that might not necessarily be outstanding for weight but just a little less work to seal off. Has anyone tried starting with a cigar tube or 5.56mm (.223) ammunition casings? I bet there are a couple of members here that have used a cigar tube as an above water steam jet. I am not sure what the cross section of a spent asthma inhaler or CO2 cartridge looks like or if it would be more work added than saved to try to use one of these.
                > >
                > > I realize many people stick to coils and don't have to worry much about leaks.
                > >
                >
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