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Re: Kitchen rudder experiment

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  • frankmcneilll
    Hi Donald, Richard and all, I borrowed an illustration from the wikipedia article Richard cited to show that a Kitchen rudder does a lot more than the clam
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 3, 2010
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      Hi Donald, Richard and all,

      I borrowed an illustration from the wikipedia article Richard cited to show that a Kitchen rudder does a lot more than the clam shell thrust reversal mechanism for jet propelled aircraft. Check out the current home page picture to see how it works.

      Best wishes, Frank

      --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "Don & Marsha Munsey Jr" <dmunseyjr@...> wrote:
      >
      > Richard,
      >
      > Have you looked at the structure and operation of the clam-shell thrust
      > reverser mechanisms found on aircraft jet engines in your radio control
      > rudder experiments?
      >
      > Keep in touch.
      >
      >
      >
      > Donald E. Munsey, Jr. dmunseyjr@...
      >
      > S/Sn42, Hn42 & Hn16 - Appalachian river logging modeler
      >
      > Virginian Railway and Big Sandy & Cumberland Railroad fan
      >
      > Living in UpperRightCorner of Louisiana
      >
      > CopperSmith & Bonsai enthusiast
      >
      >
      >
      > NOT sent from a Blackberry (or any other fruity device) - I can't afford
      > one!
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > From: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com
      > [mailto:pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of np2153
      > Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2010 9:31 PM
      > To: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats] Kitchen rudder experiment
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi everyone,
      > A while back I offered the suggestion that a Kitchen rudder might be one way
      > of controlling the speed and direction of a pop-pop boat, and might have
      > potential for a radio-controlled pop-pop. For those who don't know, the
      > Kitchen patent reversing rudder was invented by Jack Kitchen in the early
      > years of the 20th century, and is designed to control the speed and
      > direction of a boat with a constant-speed engine. It consists of a pair of
      > curved vanes surrounding the propeller that can be turned as a unit to steer
      > the boat, or closed to form a cone behind the propeller to deflect the
      > thrust forward and reverse the boat's direction. The boat can also be
      > slowed or stopped by partly closing the vanes. (More info here:
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kitchen_rudder ) Of course, it was originally
      > intended for a screw propeller, but a pop-pop engine is also a form of
      > constant-speed engine, so the idea of fitting one with a Kitchen rudder
      > seemed to have potential.
      >
      > I finally got around to testing the theory by fashioning a cone out of
      > aluminum foil and attaching it to the stern of one of my pop-pop boats, and
      > giving it a run in the kitchen sink. Sure enough, the boat ran backwards.
      > I'd estimate the speed was about 30% of the boat's normal forward speed. It
      > wanted to go in circles rather than run a straight line in reverse, but
      > considering the rudder was roughly formed out of foil and only loosely
      > attached to the boat, that's not too surprising. All in all, the experiment
      > was a success. The next step is a new hull with a proper steerable two-vane
      > Kitchen rudder and radio control.
      >
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboats/photos/album/192217721/pic/
      > 1733386574/view
      > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboats/photos/album/192217721/pic
      > /1733386574/view%20%20http:/groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboats/photos
      > /album/192217721/pic/1743570076/view>
      > Foil cone before it was attached to the boat
      >
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboats/photos/album/192217721/pic/
      > 1743570076/view
      > Foil cone attached to the boat
      >
      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5vNPEPUli0
      > YouTube video of the boat running backwards in the kitchen sink, then
      > forwards after the foil cone is pushed aside.
      >
      >
      > Richard Jenkins
      >
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