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Kitchen rudder experiment

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  • np2153
    Hi everyone, A while back I offered the suggestion that a Kitchen rudder might be one way of controlling the speed and direction of a pop-pop boat, and might
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 2, 2010
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      Hi everyone,
      A while back I offered the suggestion that a Kitchen rudder might be one way of controlling the speed and direction of a pop-pop boat, and might have potential for a radio-controlled pop-pop.  For those who don't know, the Kitchen patent reversing rudder was invented by Jack Kitchen in the early years of the 20th century, and is designed to control the speed and direction of a boat with a constant-speed engine.  It consists of a pair of curved vanes surrounding the propeller that can be turned as a unit to steer the boat, or closed to form a cone behind the propeller to deflect the thrust forward and reverse the boat's direction.  The boat can also be slowed or stopped by partly closing the vanes.   (More info here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kitchen_rudder )  Of course, it was originally intended for a screw propeller, but a pop-pop engine is also a form of constant-speed engine, so the idea of fitting one with a Kitchen rudder seemed to have potential.

      I finally got around to testing the theory by fashioning a cone out of aluminum foil and attaching it to the stern of one of my pop-pop boats, and giving it a run in the kitchen sink.  Sure enough, the boat ran backwards.  I'd estimate the speed was about 30% of the boat's normal forward speed.  It wanted to go in circles rather than run a straight line in reverse, but considering the rudder was roughly formed out of foil and only loosely attached to the boat, that's not too surprising.  All in all, the experiment was a success.  The next step is a new hull with a proper steerable two-vane Kitchen rudder and radio control.

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboats/photos/album/192217721/pic/1733386574/view
      Foil cone before it was attached to the boat

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboats/photos/album/192217721/pic/1743570076/view
      Foil cone attached to the boat

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5vNPEPUli0 
      YouTube video of the boat running backwards in the kitchen sink, then forwards after the foil cone is pushed aside.


      Richard Jenkins


    • frankmcneilll
      Hi Richard, Thanks for confirming your earlier suggestion that a Kitchen rudder could be used to provide steering and reverse propulsion for pop-pop boats.
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 2, 2010
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        Hi Richard,

        Thanks for confirming your earlier suggestion that a Kitchen rudder could be used to provide steering and reverse propulsion for pop-pop boats. This finding comes at an opportune time because we are just getting around to the possibility for developing pop-pop models of Civil War ironclads and blockade runners. You also provided a copy of Len Stevens article from the April 1996 issue of Model Boats magazine with a sketch showing an over and under arrangement of the ends of a square tube boiler. That might be better than a side by side arrangement, in the event that you decide to construct another engine for testing a radio-controlled Kitchen rudder.

        Best wishes, Frank

        --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "np2153" <rjenkins@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi everyone,
        > A while back I offered the suggestion that a Kitchen rudder might be one
        > way of controlling the speed and direction of a pop-pop boat, and might
        > have potential for a radio-controlled pop-pop. For those who don't
        > know, the Kitchen patent reversing rudder was invented by Jack Kitchen
        > in the early years of the 20th century, and is designed to control the
        > speed and direction of a boat with a constant-speed engine. It consists
        > of a pair of curved vanes surrounding the propeller that can be turned
        > as a unit to steer the boat, or closed to form a cone behind the
        > propeller to deflect the thrust forward and reverse the boat's
        > direction. The boat can also be slowed or stopped by partly closing the
        > vanes. (More info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kitchen_rudder
        > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kitchen_rudder> ) Of course, it was
        > originally intended for a screw propeller, but a pop-pop engine is also
        > a form of constant-speed engine, so the idea of fitting one with a
        > Kitchen rudder seemed to have potential.
        >
        > I finally got around to testing the theory by fashioning a cone out of
        > aluminum foil and attaching it to the stern of one of my pop-pop boats,
        > and giving it a run in the kitchen sink. Sure enough, the boat ran
        > backwards. I'd estimate the speed was about 30% of the boat's normal
        > forward speed. It wanted to go in circles rather than run a straight
        > line in reverse, but considering the rudder was roughly formed out of
        > foil and only loosely attached to the boat, that's not too surprising.
        > All in all, the experiment was a success. The next step is a new hull
        > with a proper steerable two-vane Kitchen rudder and radio control.
        >
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboats/photos/album/192217721/\
        > pic/1733386574/view
        > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboats/photos/album/192217721\
        > /pic/1733386574/view%20%20http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboa\
        > ts/photos/album/192217721/pic/1743570076/view>
        > Foil cone before it was attached to the boat
        >
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboats/photos/album/192217721/\
        > pic/1743570076/view
        > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboats/photos/album/192217721\
        > /pic/1743570076/view>
        > Foil cone attached to the boat
        >
        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5vNPEPUli0
        > <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5vNPEPUli0>
        > YouTube video of the boat running backwards in the kitchen sink, then
        > forwards after the foil cone is pushed aside.
        >
        >
        > Richard Jenkins
        >
      • Don & Marsha Munsey Jr
        Richard, Have you looked at the structure and operation of the clam-shell thrust reverser mechanisms found on aircraft jet engines in your radio control rudder
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 3, 2010
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          Richard,

          Have you looked at the structure and operation of the clam-shell thrust reverser mechanisms found on aircraft jet engines in your radio control rudder experiments?

          Keep in touch.

           

          Donald E. Munsey, Jr.          dmunseyjr@...

          S/Sn42, Hn42 & Hn16 - Appalachian river logging modeler

          Virginian Railway and Big Sandy & Cumberland Railroad fan

          Living in UpperRightCorner of Louisiana

          CopperSmith & Bonsai enthusiast

           

          NOT sent from a Blackberry (or any other fruity device) - I can't afford one!

           

           

           

           

          From: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com [mailto:pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of np2153
          Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2010 9:31 PM
          To: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats] Kitchen rudder experiment

           

           

          Hi everyone,
          A while back I offered the suggestion that a Kitchen rudder might be one way of controlling the speed and direction of a pop-pop boat, and might have potential for a radio-controlled pop-pop.  For those who don't know, the Kitchen patent reversing rudder was invented by Jack Kitchen in the early years of the 20th century, and is designed to control the speed and direction of a boat with a constant-speed engine.  It consists of a pair of curved vanes surrounding the propeller that can be turned as a unit to steer the boat, or closed to form a cone behind the propeller to deflect the thrust forward and reverse the boat's direction.  The boat can also be slowed or stopped by partly closing the vanes.   (More info here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kitchen_rudder )  Of course, it was originally intended for a screw propeller, but a pop-pop engine is also a form of constant-speed engine, so the idea of fitting one with a Kitchen rudder seemed to have potential.

          I finally got around to testing the theory by fashioning a cone out of aluminum foil and attaching it to the stern of one of my pop-pop boats, and giving it a run in the kitchen sink.  Sure enough, the boat ran backwards.  I'd estimate the speed was about 30% of the boat's normal forward speed.  It wanted to go in circles rather than run a straight line in reverse, but considering the rudder was roughly formed out of foil and only loosely attached to the boat, that's not too surprising.  All in all, the experiment was a success.  The next step is a new hull with a proper steerable two-vane Kitchen rudder and radio control.

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboats/photos/album/192217721/pic/1733386574/view
          Foil cone before it was attached to the boat

          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboats/photos/album/192217721/pic/1743570076/view
          Foil cone attached to the boat

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5vNPEPUli0 
          YouTube video of the boat running backwards in the kitchen sink, then forwards after the foil cone is pushed aside.


          Richard Jenkins

        • frankmcneilll
          Hi Donald, Richard and all, I borrowed an illustration from the wikipedia article Richard cited to show that a Kitchen rudder does a lot more than the clam
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 3, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Donald, Richard and all,

            I borrowed an illustration from the wikipedia article Richard cited to show that a Kitchen rudder does a lot more than the clam shell thrust reversal mechanism for jet propelled aircraft. Check out the current home page picture to see how it works.

            Best wishes, Frank

            --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "Don & Marsha Munsey Jr" <dmunseyjr@...> wrote:
            >
            > Richard,
            >
            > Have you looked at the structure and operation of the clam-shell thrust
            > reverser mechanisms found on aircraft jet engines in your radio control
            > rudder experiments?
            >
            > Keep in touch.
            >
            >
            >
            > Donald E. Munsey, Jr. dmunseyjr@...
            >
            > S/Sn42, Hn42 & Hn16 - Appalachian river logging modeler
            >
            > Virginian Railway and Big Sandy & Cumberland Railroad fan
            >
            > Living in UpperRightCorner of Louisiana
            >
            > CopperSmith & Bonsai enthusiast
            >
            >
            >
            > NOT sent from a Blackberry (or any other fruity device) - I can't afford
            > one!
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > From: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com
            > [mailto:pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of np2153
            > Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2010 9:31 PM
            > To: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats] Kitchen rudder experiment
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Hi everyone,
            > A while back I offered the suggestion that a Kitchen rudder might be one way
            > of controlling the speed and direction of a pop-pop boat, and might have
            > potential for a radio-controlled pop-pop. For those who don't know, the
            > Kitchen patent reversing rudder was invented by Jack Kitchen in the early
            > years of the 20th century, and is designed to control the speed and
            > direction of a boat with a constant-speed engine. It consists of a pair of
            > curved vanes surrounding the propeller that can be turned as a unit to steer
            > the boat, or closed to form a cone behind the propeller to deflect the
            > thrust forward and reverse the boat's direction. The boat can also be
            > slowed or stopped by partly closing the vanes. (More info here:
            > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kitchen_rudder ) Of course, it was originally
            > intended for a screw propeller, but a pop-pop engine is also a form of
            > constant-speed engine, so the idea of fitting one with a Kitchen rudder
            > seemed to have potential.
            >
            > I finally got around to testing the theory by fashioning a cone out of
            > aluminum foil and attaching it to the stern of one of my pop-pop boats, and
            > giving it a run in the kitchen sink. Sure enough, the boat ran backwards.
            > I'd estimate the speed was about 30% of the boat's normal forward speed. It
            > wanted to go in circles rather than run a straight line in reverse, but
            > considering the rudder was roughly formed out of foil and only loosely
            > attached to the boat, that's not too surprising. All in all, the experiment
            > was a success. The next step is a new hull with a proper steerable two-vane
            > Kitchen rudder and radio control.
            >
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboats/photos/album/192217721/pic/
            > 1733386574/view
            > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboats/photos/album/192217721/pic
            > /1733386574/view%20%20http:/groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboats/photos
            > /album/192217721/pic/1743570076/view>
            > Foil cone before it was attached to the boat
            >
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/pop-pop-steamboats/photos/album/192217721/pic/
            > 1743570076/view
            > Foil cone attached to the boat
            >
            > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5vNPEPUli0
            > YouTube video of the boat running backwards in the kitchen sink, then
            > forwards after the foil cone is pushed aside.
            >
            >
            > Richard Jenkins
            >
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