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A potential new source for pop-pop boats or kits

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  • frankmcneilll
    Hi All, I have invited Dave Rhoton, owner of the Precision Products company in Cedar City Utah to join the group in order to get information about pop-pop
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 19, 2010
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      Hi All,

      I have invited Dave Rhoton, owner of the Precision Products company in Cedar City Utah to join the group in order to get information about pop-pop boats. I inquired to find out if he might be interested in producing and marketing kits for pop-pop boats and suggested that the best way to obtain information about pop-pop boats would be to join the pop-pop steamboats discussion group.
      Go to http://www.appliedimaginationinc.com/index.html for information about Dave's company and its products and construction materials.

      Best wishes, Frank
    • zoomkat
      Being practical, somebody needs to make some working prototypes of the desired boats. There was talk of wooden boats and now possibly plastic ones. There is a
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 23, 2010
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        Being practical, somebody needs to make some working prototypes of the desired boats. There was talk of wooden boats and now possibly plastic ones. There is a pretty large divide between the available engines and boats they can be fairly easily/safely put in. As a start I suggest making the hulls such that a standard readily available indian boat will fit into and operate as the power plant. The Indian engines are cheap, but not very durable, so they would need to be replaced after a period of time. If Indian engines are not to be used, then somebody needs to prototype a copper tube engine that is simple and reliable. As to using wood for the boat, there are now some strengent (aka expensive) rules as to the use of paint on toys. There may be some exceptions for the mom and pop wooden toy makers, but that would need to be addressed.
      • Pete
        Hi Zoom... You make all valid points. From what I understand the Phlatprinter cuts plastic at present. One that cuts thin wood is in the works. Hulls could be
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 23, 2010
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          Hi Zoom...

          You make all valid points. From what I understand the Phlatprinter cuts plastic at present. One that cuts thin wood is in the works. Hulls could be made out of either plastic or wood using the "bread & butter" assembly technique (laminating several thin sheets). The Phlatprinter would require a 2D template for each layer. I'm thinking that a hull could also be designed using 4 pcs; the bottom,two sides and the transom. All of the seems would require sealing.

          I believe that we can design what ever it takes to put a boat and pop-pop kit together. Manufacturing & marketing is a different story.

          Back to 3D printing. FYI, I've uploaded some of my CAD files and pix of the rapid prototyping results.

          Most of the major components were made without drawings. I'll try to label each image.

          --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "zoomkat" <Zoomkat@...> wrote:
          >
          > Being practical, somebody needs to make some working prototypes of the desired boats. There was talk of wooden boats and now possibly plastic ones. There is a pretty large divide between the available engines and boats they can be fairly easily/safely put in. As a start I suggest making the hulls such that a standard readily available indian boat will fit into and operate as the power plant. The Indian engines are cheap, but not very durable, so they would need to be replaced after a period of time. If Indian engines are not to be used, then somebody needs to prototype a copper tube engine that is simple and reliable. As to using wood for the boat, there are now some strengent (aka expensive) rules as to the use of paint on toys. There may be some exceptions for the mom and pop wooden toy makers, but that would need to be addressed.
          >
        • zoomkat
          Just a reality check, plastic and fire do not mix well in a commercial setting. Wood or metal would probably the only materials that an insurer would
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 24, 2010
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            Just a reality check, plastic and fire do not mix well in a commercial setting. Wood or metal would probably the only materials that an insurer would underwrite. Plastic is ok for DIY pop pop boats, but I don't think it would fly in the US as a commercial product.

            --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "Pete" <georgeyyy@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > Hi Zoom...
            >
            > You make all valid points. From what I understand the Phlatprinter cuts plastic at present. One that cuts thin wood is in the works. Hulls could be made out of either plastic or wood using the "bread & butter" assembly technique (laminating several thin sheets). The Phlatprinter would require a 2D template for each layer. I'm thinking that a hull could also be designed using 4 pcs; the bottom,two sides and the transom. All of the seems would require sealing.
          • Pete
            Plastic is definitely no the material of choice for a commercial pop-pop kit. I do however think that it is a starting place for a new venture. I have seen
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 24, 2010
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              Plastic is definitely no the material of choice for a commercial pop-pop kit. I do however think that it is a starting place for a new venture.

              I have seen plastic candle holders at weddings etc. So plastic is acceptable in some venues. I have also seen wind cups placed over candles at memorial services. The basic is a simple Dixie type cup designed for that purpose and others are a clear plastic. The plastics in both cases is probably self extinquishing.

              In any case plastic & the phlat printer would work for prototypes and perhaps beyond. You never know.

              --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "zoomkat" <Zoomkat@...> wrote:
              >
              > Just a reality check, plastic and fire do not mix well in a commercial setting. Wood or metal would probably the only materials that an insurer would underwrite. Plastic is ok for DIY pop pop boats, but I don't think it would fly in the US as a commercial product.
              >
              > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "Pete" <georgeyyy@> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Hi Zoom...
              > >
              > > You make all valid points. From what I understand the Phlatprinter cuts plastic at present. One that cuts thin wood is in the works. Hulls could be made out of either plastic or wood using the "bread & butter" assembly technique (laminating several thin sheets). The Phlatprinter would require a 2D template for each layer. I'm thinking that a hull could also be designed using 4 pcs; the bottom,two sides and the transom. All of the seems would require sealing.
              >
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