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Re: Soft soldered engine and charcoal burner?

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  • Tim
    Hi Zoomkat I think your right. We are working along similar lines at the moment I think. Good luck in your endeavors. Tim
    Message 1 of 13 , Sep 25, 2009
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      Hi Zoomkat

      I think your right. We are working along similar lines at the moment I think.

      Good luck in your endeavors.

      Tim

      --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "zoomkat" <Zoomkat@...> wrote:
      >
      > I think it is a given that solder will generally only work well with engines powered with candles and similar low heat sources. That is why I'm looking at brazing and welding for larger engines.
      >
      > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <p-40.av8r@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi all.
      > >
      > > Sorry for replying to myself, but I just did a test on an engine with some charcoal in a can and it melted the engine. Did the motor dry out or am I fighting a losing battle here?
      > >
      > > Thanks for any advice.
      > >
      > > Tim
      > >
      > > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <p-40.av8r@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hi all.
      > > >
      > > > Some advice on a simple question please.
      > > >
      > > > Is it possible to make a soft soldered engine and use charcoal to fire it? Does it get to hot and melt the solder? I intend to make something similar to the 4 dollar engine in the pop pop engines photo album using solder ring plumbing fittings.
      > > >
      > > > Related to this question. I plan to use 15x1mm copper pipe. I would like to thread it rather than solder it, but most standard threads are to deep. Has anyone any experience or ideas regarding this. 15mm is an odd size in the u.k. for threads anyway. I was thinking I could use a 1/2" BSP die but I think the pipe is not thick enough. Perhaps 1/2" UNF if I can get one. Or some other fine 1/2" thread, as the thread is not so deep for finer pitches.
      > > >
      > > > Any advice offered would be much appreciated.
      > > >
      > > > Tim
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • zoomkat
      ... I ve checked my collection of toys gathered over the years and I have a small oxy/propane/mapp torch like below (I think they sell for ~$55). As best as
      Message 2 of 13 , Sep 25, 2009
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        --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <p-40.av8r@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Zoomkat
        >
        > I think your right. We are working along similar lines at the moment I think.
        >
        > Good luck in your endeavors.
        >
        > Tim

        I've checked my collection of "toys" gathered over the years and I have a small oxy/propane/mapp torch like below (I think they sell for ~$55). As best as I remember the oxygen bottle gets used quickly and cost ~$8 to replace (it will melt steel). Also in the collection are the butane torch, several propane torches, two MAAP gas brazing torches, a cheap 80 amp flux wire MIG welder, and an old 80-200 amp AC arc welder. In years past I tried the MIG welder on tin can metal and it is way too hot for the thin metal. I'll do some testing with the oxy/propane/mapp torch on some tin can lids to see how well it works.

        http://www.acehardwaresuperstore.com/bernzomatic-welding-and-brazing-torch-kit-p-74981.html?ref=42
      • David Halfpenny
        ... From: Tim Sent: Friday, September 25, 2009 9:11 PM ... Just a comment on supplies: There s an unfortunate trend for retailers to
        Message 3 of 13 , Sep 25, 2009
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          --------------------------------------------------
          From: "Tim" <p-40.av8r@...>
          Sent: Friday, September 25, 2009 9:11 PM

          > I plan to get some silver solder over the next few days and do some
          > trials with that as David has suggested.

          Just a comment on supplies:

          There's an unfortunate trend for retailers to label 'silver-bearing soft
          solder' as "Silver Solder" for short.

          It is merely a type of soft solder, and isn't at all what we want.

          The safest thing to do is to avoid the traditional term 'silver solder'
          altogether to avoid confusion. 'Hard solder' is the old hobby term, and
          'silver brazing' is the engineering equivalent.

          David 1/2d
        • zoomkat
          ... Below are some general info links. Silver brazing rods can be $$$ so bronze rods might be more affordable. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazing
          Message 4 of 13 , Sep 25, 2009
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            --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "David Halfpenny" <dh1@...> wrote:
            >
            > --------------------------------------------------
            > From: "Tim" <p-40.av8r@...>
            > Sent: Friday, September 25, 2009 9:11 PM
            >
            > > I plan to get some silver solder over the next few days and do some
            > > trials with that as David has suggested.
            >
            > Just a comment on supplies:
            >
            > There's an unfortunate trend for retailers to label 'silver-bearing soft
            > solder' as "Silver Solder" for short.
            >
            > It is merely a type of soft solder, and isn't at all what we want.
            >
            > The safest thing to do is to avoid the traditional term 'silver solder'
            > altogether to avoid confusion. 'Hard solder' is the old hobby term, and
            > 'silver brazing' is the engineering equivalent.
            >
            > David 1/2d
            >

            Below are some general info links. Silver brazing rods can be $$$ so bronze rods might be more affordable.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazing
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soldering
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welding

            http://tinyurl.com/ycddmgj
          • Tim
            David and Zoomkat. Many thanks for the hints, tips and links. After your suggestion of it I looked around and I had noticed many claim soft solder with silver
            Message 5 of 13 , Sep 26, 2009
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              David and Zoomkat.

              Many thanks for the hints, tips and links.

              After your suggestion of it I looked around and I had noticed many claim soft solder with silver content to be silver solder. I have found a specialist welding supply fairly locally that also do soldering consumables. Thank you for bringing it to my attention though. I would have been most upset if I had used the wrong stuff and it all melted again. I will go there on Monday and seek their advice. What implications on the ability to withstand high temperatures would using bronze rods have Zoomkat?

              Best regards.

              Tim

              --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "zoomkat" <Zoomkat@...> wrote:
              >
              > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "David Halfpenny" <dh1@> wrote:
              > >
              > > --------------------------------------------------
              > > From: "Tim" <p-40.av8r@>
              > > Sent: Friday, September 25, 2009 9:11 PM
              > >
              > > > I plan to get some silver solder over the next few days and do some
              > > > trials with that as David has suggested.
              > >
              > > Just a comment on supplies:
              > >
              > > There's an unfortunate trend for retailers to label 'silver-bearing soft
              > > solder' as "Silver Solder" for short.
              > >
              > > It is merely a type of soft solder, and isn't at all what we want.
              > >
              > > The safest thing to do is to avoid the traditional term 'silver solder'
              > > altogether to avoid confusion. 'Hard solder' is the old hobby term, and
              > > 'silver brazing' is the engineering equivalent.
              > >
              > > David 1/2d
              > >
              >
              > Below are some general info links. Silver brazing rods can be $$$ so bronze rods might be more affordable.
              >
              > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazing
              > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soldering
              > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welding
              >
              > http://tinyurl.com/ycddmgj
              >
            • David Halfpenny
              ... From: Tim Sent: Saturday, September 26, 2009 8:46 AM To: Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats] Re:
              Message 6 of 13 , Sep 26, 2009
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                --------------------------------------------------
                From: "Tim" <p-40.av8r@...>
                Sent: Saturday, September 26, 2009 8:46 AM
                To: <pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com>
                Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats] Re: Soft soldered engine and charcoal burner?

                > David and Zoomkat.
                >
                > Many thanks for the hints, tips and links.
                >
                > After your suggestion of it I looked around and I had noticed many claim
                > soft solder with silver content to be silver solder. I have found a
                > specialist welding supply fairly locally that also do soldering
                > consumables. Thank you for bringing it to my attention though. I would
                > have been most upset if I had used the wrong stuff and it all melted
                > again. I will go there on Monday and seek their advice. What
                > implications on the ability to withstand high temperatures would using
                > bronze rods have Zoomkat?
                >

                Bronze is even higher temperature than silver spelter, and not really
                suitable for thin metal. Certainly not brass!

                It is true that ounce for ounce silver costs more, but that is a red
                herring as one thin little rod will make a lot of Pop-Pops.

                David 1/2d
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