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Solder tin can lids?

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  • zoomkat
    I d like to duplicate my can lid engine using solder instead of JB Weld epoxy. Doses anybody have experience/info on preping steel can metal for soldering?
    Message 1 of 14 , Sep 11, 2009
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      I'd like to duplicate my can lid engine using solder instead of JB Weld epoxy. Doses anybody have experience/info on preping steel can metal for soldering? Food cans have all types of coatings that resist solder wetting and make using solder difficult/impossible. So far heating the lids cherry red to burn off coatings, sanding the surface with sand paper, and then soldering with acid core flux seems the most likely success path. Sometimes the solder sticks, and sometimes it doesn't. Heating with an electric soldering iron seems to have better results over a micro torch so far. Anybody have experience in this area?
    • Slater Harrison
      Heating steel to cherry red might burn of plastic coatings but create oxide layers that are also barriers to flux/solder. I suggest fine sandpaper. Slater
      Message 2 of 14 , Sep 11, 2009
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        Heating steel to cherry red might burn of plastic coatings but create oxide layers that are also barriers to flux/solder. I suggest fine sandpaper.

         

        Slater

         

        From: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com [mailto:pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of zoomkat
        Sent: Friday, September 11, 2009 2:39 PM
        To: pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats] Solder tin can lids?

         

         

        I'd like to duplicate my can lid engine using solder instead of JB Weld epoxy. Doses anybody have experience/info on preping steel can metal for soldering? Food cans have all types of coatings that resist solder wetting and make using solder difficult/impossible. So far heating the lids cherry red to burn off coatings, sanding the surface with sand paper, and then soldering with acid core flux seems the most likely success path. Sometimes the solder sticks, and sometimes it doesn't. Heating with an electric soldering iron seems to have better results over a micro torch so far. Anybody have experience in this area?



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      • David Halfpenny
        ... From: zoomkat Sent: Friday, September 11, 2009 7:38 PM ... Soft solder: Will survive if kept wet inside as long as the flame
        Message 3 of 14 , Sep 11, 2009
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          --------------------------------------------------
          From: "zoomkat" <Zoomkat@...>
          Sent: Friday, September 11, 2009 7:38 PM

          > Does anybody have experience/info on preping steel can metal for
          > soldering? Food cans have all types of coatings that resist solder
          > wetting and make using solder difficult/impossible.

          Soft solder:
          Will survive if kept wet inside as long as the flame doesn't play on the
          joint.

          Steel food cans in England are coated with tin under the paint, varnish
          etc.

          There is no need to clean them at all, unless they've got greasy.

          There's also no need to "tin" the steel with solder either as it's already
          tinned ;-)

          Just use a paste flux and big soldering iron, and the paint will float
          away. A dab of solder wire onto the hot metal and the joint is done.

          > heating the lids cherry red to burn off coatings

          will burn off the very tin you need for the joint, , put you to a lot of
          work to remove the oxides you have created, plus the work of re-coating the
          surface with solder which is largely, er, tin.

          Hard solder = silver brazing
          Will survive to dull red heat.

          Just use abrasives to get down to bare steel. This time you DO want to get
          all the tin off or it will mess with the silver spelter.

          You need a borax or Easyflow flux and a proper hard silver brazing rod. NOT
          what is passed off as "silver solder" in reels.

          Heat to cherry red and apply spelter to hot metal.

          These are not brilliant descriptions of soft soldering and silver brazing,
          but they illustrate the difference.

          David 1/2d
          ex Metal Box Company Ltd
          tin can makers to the world

          h

          So far , sanding the surface with sand paper, and then soldering with acid
          core flux seems the most likely success path. Sometimes the solder sticks,
          and sometimes it doesn't. Heating with an electric soldering iron seems to
          have better results over a micro torch so far. Anybody have experience in
          this area?
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • zoomkat
          Well, I got it made. A tea candle doesn t quite have enough heat to run it well. Using a tea candle holder filled with sterno has too much heat. Engine runs
          Message 4 of 14 , Sep 11, 2009
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            Well, I got it made. A tea candle doesn't quite have enough heat to run it well. Using a tea candle holder filled with sterno has too much heat. Engine runs for a little bit until the boiler eventually dries out and then the solder starts to melt in various places. Had to resolder the boiler/tubes ~5 times so far. The "phizzit!" sound is getting to be familiar. Added some pix to my pix folder. I may get a silver solder rod and see if my MAPP gas torch will get the small parts hot enough to braze. Now to try soldering my pie pans together.

            --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "zoomkat" <Zoomkat@...> wrote:
            >
            > I'd like to duplicate my can lid engine using solder instead of JB Weld epoxy. Doses anybody have experience/info on preping steel can metal for soldering? Food cans have all types of coatings that resist solder wetting and make using solder difficult/impossible. So far heating the lids cherry red to burn off coatings, sanding the surface with sand paper, and then soldering with acid core flux seems the most likely success path. Sometimes the solder sticks, and sometimes it doesn't. Heating with an electric soldering iron seems to have better results over a micro torch so far. Anybody have experience in this area?
            >
          • frankmcneilll
            Go to http://tinyurl.com/r6nctm for a blast from the distant past titled Improvement In Lamp Wicks. You might have to scroll down past several advertisements
            Message 5 of 14 , Sep 11, 2009
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              Go to http://tinyurl.com/r6nctm for a blast from the distant past titled "Improvement In Lamp Wicks." You might have to scroll down past several advertisements from the recent past. The advantage of this wick might be that it could be in the form of a straight, or curved, trough positioned under a straight, or curved, section of boiler tube. Gypsum is the stuff drywall is made of. To obtain gypsum, chop a hole in the nearest drywall, best done without witnesses.

              --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "zoomkat" <Zoomkat@...> wrote:
              >
              > Well, I got it made. A tea candle doesn't quite have enough heat to run it well. Using a tea candle holder filled with sterno has too much heat. Engine runs for a little bit until the boiler eventually dries out and then the solder starts to melt in various places. Had to resolder the boiler/tubes ~5 times so far. The "phizzit!" sound is getting to be familiar. Added some pix to my pix folder. I may get a silver solder rod and see if my MAPP gas torch will get the small parts hot enough to braze. Now to try soldering my pie pans together.
              >
              > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "zoomkat" <Zoomkat@> wrote:
              > >
              > > I'd like to duplicate my can lid engine using solder instead of JB Weld epoxy. Doses anybody have experience/info on preping steel can metal for soldering? Food cans have all types of coatings that resist solder wetting and make using solder difficult/impossible. So far heating the lids cherry red to burn off coatings, sanding the surface with sand paper, and then soldering with acid core flux seems the most likely success path. Sometimes the solder sticks, and sometimes it doesn't. Heating with an electric soldering iron seems to have better results over a micro torch so far. Anybody have experience in this area?
              > >
              >
            • Donald Qualls
              ... You re on the right track using plumber s solder and flux. I wouldn t bother with heating the lid, just sand the areas you re going to solder until you
              Message 6 of 14 , Sep 12, 2009
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                zoomkat wrote:
                > I'd like to duplicate my can lid engine using solder instead of JB
                > Weld epoxy. Doses anybody have experience/info on preping steel can
                > metal for soldering? Food cans have all types of coatings that resist
                > solder wetting and make using solder difficult/impossible. So far
                > heating the lids cherry red to burn off coatings, sanding the surface
                > with sand paper, and then soldering with acid core flux seems the
                > most likely success path. Sometimes the solder sticks, and sometimes
                > it doesn't. Heating with an electric soldering iron seems to have
                > better results over a micro torch so far. Anybody have experience in
                > this area?

                You're on the right track using plumber's solder and flux. I wouldn't
                bother with heating the lid, just sand the areas you're going to solder
                until you have bright bare metal, tin (I have tinning flux, it's got
                tiny particles of solder in a brush-on flux mixture that resembles
                off-color petroleum jelly), join, heat, and flow the solder into the
                joint -- just like you'd do to solder copper pipe.

                --
                If, through hard work and perseverance, you finally get what you want,
                it's probably a sign you weren't dreaming big enough.

                Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer http://silent1.home.netcom.com

                Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
                and don't expect them to be perfect.
              • Donald Qualls
                ... MAPP gas should have plenty of heat to silver braze thin metal like that; you can most likely do it with propane. -- If, through hard work and
                Message 7 of 14 , Sep 12, 2009
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                  zoomkat wrote:
                  > I may get a
                  > silver solder rod and see if my MAPP gas torch will get the small
                  > parts hot enough to braze.

                  MAPP gas should have plenty of heat to silver braze thin metal like
                  that; you can most likely do it with propane.

                  --
                  If, through hard work and perseverance, you finally get what you want,
                  it's probably a sign you weren't dreaming big enough.

                  Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer http://silent1.home.netcom.com

                  Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
                  and don't expect them to be perfect.
                • zoomkat
                  Brazing requires one to get the work pretty hot (usually red hot using oxy/acetylene rigs). Muggy weld below has some interesting brazing videos promoting
                  Message 8 of 14 , Sep 13, 2009
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                    Brazing requires one to get the work pretty hot (usually red hot using oxy/acetylene rigs). Muggy weld below has some interesting brazing videos promoting their products (looks so easy). Bottom is the Harris site with the spec sheets for their brazing rods and solder. In the past I've has an interest in the Stay Brite 8 solder with MAPP gas for use with AC equipment, but haven't tried it yet.

                    http://www.muggyweld.com/video.html
                    http://www.harrisproductsgroup.com/consumables/msds.asp



                    --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, Donald Qualls <silent1@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > zoomkat wrote:
                    > > I may get a
                    > > silver solder rod and see if my MAPP gas torch will get the small
                    > > parts hot enough to braze.
                    >
                    > MAPP gas should have plenty of heat to silver braze thin metal like
                    > that; you can most likely do it with propane.
                    >
                    > --
                    > If, through hard work and perseverance, you finally get what you want,
                    > it's probably a sign you weren't dreaming big enough.
                    >
                    > Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer http://silent1.home.netcom.com
                    >
                    > Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
                    > and don't expect them to be perfect.
                    >
                  • David Halfpenny
                    Using oxy-acetylene for this kind of work is overkill that you d only do if you had acetylene gear to hand, plus the skill to do really delicate work with it,
                    Message 9 of 14 , Sep 13, 2009
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                      Using oxy-acetylene for this kind of work is overkill that you'd only do if
                      you had acetylene gear to hand, plus the skill to do really delicate work
                      with it, plus you can't afford the few dollars needed to for a cheap butane
                      torch.

                      David 1/2d

                      --------------------------------------------------
                      From: "zoomkat" <Zoomkat@...>
                      Sent: Sunday, September 13, 2009 8:26 PM
                      To: <pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com>
                      Subject: [pop-pop-steamboats] Re: Solder tin can lids?

                      > Brazing requires one to get the work pretty hot (usually red hot using
                      > oxy/acetylene rigs). Muggy weld below has some interesting brazing videos
                      > promoting their products (looks so easy). Bottom is the Harris site with
                      > the spec sheets for their brazing rods and solder. In the past I've has
                      > an interest in the Stay Brite 8 solder with MAPP gas for use with AC
                      > equipment, but haven't tried it yet.
                      >
                    • Donald Qualls
                      While this is true, a propane torch of the home hobbyist variety will easily achieve this with one or two can lids and a similarly sized piece of something
                      Message 10 of 14 , Sep 13, 2009
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                        While this is true, a propane torch of the home hobbyist variety will
                        easily achieve this with one or two can lids and a similarly sized piece
                        of something else being joined.

                        zoomkat wrote:
                        > Brazing requires one to get the work pretty hot (usually red hot using oxy/acetylene rigs). Muggy weld below has some interesting brazing videos promoting their products (looks so easy). Bottom is the Harris site with the spec sheets for their brazing rods and solder. In the past I've has an interest in the Stay Brite 8 solder with MAPP gas for use with AC equipment, but haven't tried it yet.
                        >
                        > http://www.muggyweld.com/video.html
                        > http://www.harrisproductsgroup.com/consumables/msds.asp
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, Donald Qualls <silent1@...> wrote:
                        >> zoomkat wrote:
                        >>> I may get a
                        >>> silver solder rod and see if my MAPP gas torch will get the small
                        >>> parts hot enough to braze.
                        >> MAPP gas should have plenty of heat to silver braze thin metal like
                        >> that; you can most likely do it with propane.
                        >>

                        --
                        If, through hard work and perseverance, you finally get what you want,
                        it's probably a sign you weren't dreaming big enough.

                        Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer http://silent1.home.netcom.com

                        Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
                        and don't expect them to be perfect.
                      • Tim
                        Hi Zoomkat. I have been doing an experiment on another project, and stumbled across something that in a round about way might help. I recently have doing some
                        Message 11 of 14 , Oct 1, 2009
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                          Hi Zoomkat.

                          I have been doing an experiment on another project, and stumbled across something that in a round about way might help. I recently have doing some basic plating and electroplating. It should be possible when you have burned off the lid, to clean it well, and maybe plate it in zinc or copper, this may help you solder it. I have had fairly good results so far soft soldering, though I have not tried can lids yet. I do not know how much temperature this will take, I guess it depends on the amount of plating. I don't know at the moment. I did have a pleasant accident though, and when attempting to hard solder a piece that I had zinc and copper plated, ended up as brass. That particular example ended up as a disaster but I was happy anyway. Makes sense, and I learned a thing or two about metal and chemistry along the way. Early days yet, but I am considering using this technique in some of my pop pop projects, plating some of the cans and bits, to see how it affects the thermal properties, ease of soldering and perhaps a more pleasant or brighter appearance. In particular, I am going to copper plate one of my no solder or glue motors to see if I can make it more efficient when heated from above.

                          Best regards.

                          Tim

                          --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "zoomkat" <Zoomkat@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > I'd like to duplicate my can lid engine using solder instead of JB Weld epoxy. Doses anybody have experience/info on preping steel can metal for soldering? Food cans have all types of coatings that resist solder wetting and make using solder difficult/impossible. So far heating the lids cherry red to burn off coatings, sanding the surface with sand paper, and then soldering with acid core flux seems the most likely success path. Sometimes the solder sticks, and sometimes it doesn't. Heating with an electric soldering iron seems to have better results over a micro torch so far. Anybody have experience in this area?
                          >
                        • frankmcneilll
                          Hi Tim, Zoomkat, and everybody else who has posted on this topic- I haven t followed this closely, so maybe I overlooked an explanation about how the lids are
                          Message 12 of 14 , Oct 2, 2009
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                            Hi Tim, Zoomkat, and everybody else who has posted on this topic-

                            I haven't followed this closely, so maybe I overlooked an explanation about how the lids are removed from cans. My wife is a mail order shopaholic, so we have a collection of junk that doesn't work or that wasn't needed in the first place, but we do have what is possibly the world's best can opener, the "One-Touch" which cuts the can instead of the lid. Cutting lids from both ends- preferably after contents have been removed- would provide two lids with their rims intact. Soldering the rims together would make it unnecessary to remove the slippery stuff most cans are coated with inside.

                            Best wishes, Old Frank

                            --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <p-40.av8r@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Hi Zoomkat.
                            >
                            > I have been doing an experiment on another project, and stumbled across something that in a round about way might help. I recently have doing some basic plating and electroplating. It should be possible when you have burned off the lid, to clean it well, and maybe plate it in zinc or copper, this may help you solder it. I have had fairly good results so far soft soldering, though I have not tried can lids yet. I do not know how much temperature this will take, I guess it depends on the amount of plating. I don't know at the moment. I did have a pleasant accident though, and when attempting to hard solder a piece that I had zinc and copper plated, ended up as brass. That particular example ended up as a disaster but I was happy anyway. Makes sense, and I learned a thing or two about metal and chemistry along the way. Early days yet, but I am considering using this technique in some of my pop pop projects, plating some of the cans and bits, to see how it affects the thermal properties, ease of soldering and perhaps a more pleasant or brighter appearance. In particular, I am going to copper plate one of my no solder or glue motors to see if I can make it more efficient when heated from above.
                            >
                            > Best regards.
                            >
                            > Tim
                            >
                            > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "zoomkat" <Zoomkat@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > I'd like to duplicate my can lid engine using solder instead of JB Weld epoxy. Doses anybody have experience/info on preping steel can metal for soldering? Food cans have all types of coatings that resist solder wetting and make using solder difficult/impossible. So far heating the lids cherry red to burn off coatings, sanding the surface with sand paper, and then soldering with acid core flux seems the most likely success path. Sometimes the solder sticks, and sometimes it doesn't. Heating with an electric soldering iron seems to have better results over a micro torch so far. Anybody have experience in this area?
                            > >
                            >
                          • zoomkat
                            I ve posted a picture of the Miracle Can can opener I ve previously mentioned. It cuts the tops off of the cans and is what I used years ago for my can lid
                            Message 13 of 14 , Oct 2, 2009
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                              I've posted a picture of the "Miracle Can" can opener I've previously mentioned. It cuts the tops off of the cans and is what I used years ago for my can lid engine. Mating the can tops top to top and soldering the edges makes a round thin boiler. On my can lid engine using too much heat results in the solder melting when it runs. Need a heat source larger than a candle that can be controlled. I've got some 6 oz juice cans that I'm going to try the ends of for a small engine. My next experiment is to use the opener to remove the ends of a can, then flattening the can into a flat boiler shape (somewhat like Slayter's engines). This might make for more secure sealing with solder. The far end can be crimped and soldered, with the crimped portion being large enough for air cooling to prevent the solder melting. On the pipe end, if the engine is tilted, some water will be trapped at the soldered edge preventing solder metlting temperatures. The sides of the engine will require no soldering.

                              --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "frankmcneilll" <frankmcneilll@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Hi Tim, Zoomkat, and everybody else who has posted on this topic-
                              >
                              > I haven't followed this closely, so maybe I overlooked an explanation about how the lids are removed from cans. My wife is a mail order shopaholic, so we have a collection of junk that doesn't work or that wasn't needed in the first place, but we do have what is possibly the world's best can opener, the "One-Touch" which cuts the can instead of the lid. Cutting lids from both ends- preferably after contents have been removed- would provide two lids with their rims intact. Soldering the rims together would make it unnecessary to remove the slippery stuff most cans are coated with inside.
                              >
                              > Best wishes, Old Frank
                              >
                              > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <p-40.av8r@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > Hi Zoomkat.
                              > >
                              > > I have been doing an experiment on another project, and stumbled across something that in a round about way might help. I recently have doing some basic plating and electroplating. It should be possible when you have burned off the lid, to clean it well, and maybe plate it in zinc or copper, this may help you solder it. I have had fairly good results so far soft soldering, though I have not tried can lids yet. I do not know how much temperature this will take, I guess it depends on the amount of plating. I don't know at the moment. I did have a pleasant accident though, and when attempting to hard solder a piece that I had zinc and copper plated, ended up as brass. That particular example ended up as a disaster but I was happy anyway. Makes sense, and I learned a thing or two about metal and chemistry along the way. Early days yet, but I am considering using this technique in some of my pop pop projects, plating some of the cans and bits, to see how it affects the thermal properties, ease of soldering and perhaps a more pleasant or brighter appearance. In particular, I am going to copper plate one of my no solder or glue motors to see if I can make it more efficient when heated from above.
                              > >
                              > > Best regards.
                              > >
                              > > Tim
                              > >
                              > > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "zoomkat" <Zoomkat@> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > I'd like to duplicate my can lid engine using solder instead of JB Weld epoxy. Doses anybody have experience/info on preping steel can metal for soldering? Food cans have all types of coatings that resist solder wetting and make using solder difficult/impossible. So far heating the lids cherry red to burn off coatings, sanding the surface with sand paper, and then soldering with acid core flux seems the most likely success path. Sometimes the solder sticks, and sometimes it doesn't. Heating with an electric soldering iron seems to have better results over a micro torch so far. Anybody have experience in this area?
                              > > >
                              > >
                              >
                            • Tim
                              Hi Zoomkat. Need a heat source larger than a candle that can be controlled . I have been using commonly available cotton string used for parcel packing as a
                              Message 14 of 14 , Oct 2, 2009
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                                Hi Zoomkat.

                                "Need a heat source larger than a candle that can be controlled".

                                I have been using commonly available cotton string used for parcel packing as a wick. I use vegetable oil for the fuel though it is a bit sooty. I believe olive oil is less sooty. You can use a jar lid or make a small fuel tank. I have used a jar lid, with a pull tab from a drinks can inserted into the edge of the lid and the string wrapped through the holes, and a good length coiled up in the lid. See pictures in my album "test" It enables you to adjust easily the length of the wick and therefore the size of the flame. Also it is simple if you need more heat to add another wick, and substantially increase the heat. You can also observe the fuel level easily in tests, and with pliers, adjust the wick length on the run. I use this method with all the small motors I have made, and also in all my Indian boats. I suspect the flame is hotter than a candle, and have been able to "tune" the wick length to the motor to get the best power repeatedly. Some of my motors have run well with two or three short wicks rather than one large one. It is simple to change. I did start off with tea lights and candles, but have found this method more flexible with smaller motors, as you can make your tank as shallow as the string you use, as well as being as wide and long as you want. As another benefit I have found that using the boats outside, that the oil fueled flame is much less prone to being blown out by the wind, and requires a hefty lung full to extinguish. The oil burns quite slowly as well giving good fuel economy in my opinion.

                                I hope this may be of help to you in your tests.

                                Best regards.

                                Tim.

                                --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "zoomkat" <Zoomkat@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > I've posted a picture of the "Miracle Can" can opener I've previously mentioned. It cuts the tops off of the cans and is what I used years ago for my can lid engine. Mating the can tops top to top and soldering the edges makes a round thin boiler. On my can lid engine using too much heat results in the solder melting when it runs. Need a heat source larger than a candle that can be controlled. I've got some 6 oz juice cans that I'm going to try the ends of for a small engine. My next experiment is to use the opener to remove the ends of a can, then flattening the can into a flat boiler shape (somewhat like Slayter's engines). This might make for more secure sealing with solder. The far end can be crimped and soldered, with the crimped portion being large enough for air cooling to prevent the solder melting. On the pipe end, if the engine is tilted, some water will be trapped at the soldered edge preventing solder metlting temperatures. The sides of the engine will require no soldering.
                                >
                                > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "frankmcneilll" <frankmcneilll@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Hi Tim, Zoomkat, and everybody else who has posted on this topic-
                                > >
                                > > I haven't followed this closely, so maybe I overlooked an explanation about how the lids are removed from cans. My wife is a mail order shopaholic, so we have a collection of junk that doesn't work or that wasn't needed in the first place, but we do have what is possibly the world's best can opener, the "One-Touch" which cuts the can instead of the lid. Cutting lids from both ends- preferably after contents have been removed- would provide two lids with their rims intact. Soldering the rims together would make it unnecessary to remove the slippery stuff most cans are coated with inside.
                                > >
                                > > Best wishes, Old Frank
                                > >
                                > > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "Tim" <p-40.av8r@> wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > > Hi Zoomkat.
                                > > >
                                > > > I have been doing an experiment on another project, and stumbled across something that in a round about way might help. I recently have doing some basic plating and electroplating. It should be possible when you have burned off the lid, to clean it well, and maybe plate it in zinc or copper, this may help you solder it. I have had fairly good results so far soft soldering, though I have not tried can lids yet. I do not know how much temperature this will take, I guess it depends on the amount of plating. I don't know at the moment. I did have a pleasant accident though, and when attempting to hard solder a piece that I had zinc and copper plated, ended up as brass. That particular example ended up as a disaster but I was happy anyway. Makes sense, and I learned a thing or two about metal and chemistry along the way. Early days yet, but I am considering using this technique in some of my pop pop projects, plating some of the cans and bits, to see how it affects the thermal properties, ease of soldering and perhaps a more pleasant or brighter appearance. In particular, I am going to copper plate one of my no solder or glue motors to see if I can make it more efficient when heated from above.
                                > > >
                                > > > Best regards.
                                > > >
                                > > > Tim
                                > > >
                                > > > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "zoomkat" <Zoomkat@> wrote:
                                > > > >
                                > > > > I'd like to duplicate my can lid engine using solder instead of JB Weld epoxy. Doses anybody have experience/info on preping steel can metal for soldering? Food cans have all types of coatings that resist solder wetting and make using solder difficult/impossible. So far heating the lids cherry red to burn off coatings, sanding the surface with sand paper, and then soldering with acid core flux seems the most likely success path. Sometimes the solder sticks, and sometimes it doesn't. Heating with an electric soldering iron seems to have better results over a micro torch so far. Anybody have experience in this area?
                                > > > >
                                > > >
                                > >
                                >
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