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Re: Big engines revisited

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  • northriver07
    Zoomkat Thanks for your continued interests and your posts. You spark for our latest discussions. Pete
    Message 1 of 32 , Aug 30, 2009
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      "Zoomkat"

      Thanks for your continued interests and your posts. You spark for our latest discussions.

      Pete

      --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "zoomkat" <Zoomkat@...> wrote:
      >
      > What are the experiments you tried with a flat flash boiler? With a drum lid flash boiler I would insulate the top with some fiberglss insulation to reduce the heat loss thru the top surface. In 1998 (inspied by the drum lid report) I did some tinkering with making flat flash boilers out of the ends of tin cans. I used a european "MIRACLE CAN OPENER" that cut the top off of a can along the side edge of the can top instead of the top of the can (I think this can probably with a regular type of can opener). This would produce flat can end pieces which I glued to gether with epoxy to make a very thin flat boiler. These worked to an extent, but temps had to be limited to keep the epoxy from starting to get too hot. I never got around to trying to solder the edges together. Something similar might be done with paint can lids. The challange is to be able to get the boiler halves to be securely held together and sealed to contain the flash pressures. High temp 600 deg RTV gasket material probably be used as a sealant. The pie pans I got at the DollarTree store have a small flange wide enough to put some small bolts thru to secure the two pans together.
      >
      > --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, Daryl Foster <darylcanada73@> wrote:
      > >
      > > The "BUT" in this design boiler is that the very large heated surface is offset by an equally large unheated (cooling) surface which in my experiments is a poor design. The small volume part of the "pancake" shape is good but in function it is more like simmer than flash.
      >
    • zoomkat
      Without Dean Still providing some details on the engine, it is still somewhat of a rumor as to its operation. I do think the pancake flash boiler is what will
      Message 32 of 32 , Sep 7, 2009
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        Without Dean Still providing some details on the engine, it is still somewhat of a rumor as to its operation. I do think the pancake flash boiler is what will be needed to make a larger engine. Making a duplicate drum lid engine will require a little more work and tools than the typical toy type engine (mainly drilling larger holes in the lid and welding the boiler components together). I need to see if there is a local steel drum supplier that might have drum lids for sale. I put a couple of pix of a can lid engine I made years ago in my file folder. I made it using JB Weld epoxy so the amount of heat I could apply was limited before I started smelling the hot epoxy. I've got my pie pans and need to see if the edges will solder instead of sealing and bolting. I also found a 150 watt soldering iron so I need to see if I can clean the can lid edges so they will solder.

        --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "darylcanada73" <darylcanada73@...> wrote:
        >
        > An update on "Trying to track down the 16' 3 MPH canoe."
        >
        > 1. As I understand it, Nick Carter saw a big pop pop engine and heard a story to go with it that named Dean Still as the builder. This all started with a forum post on another site in 1998.
        >
        > 2. Dean Still provided no further information, did not confirm the information from Nick and referred my to Dr. Larry Winiarski.
        >
        > 3. Dr. Winiarski added nothing to solve the mystery.
        >
        > My guess is: Someone told Nick about the Payne experiments. Someone (Dean Still) showed Nick a big engine and it all got really confusing from there.
        >
        > If any of you live in or near Cottage Grove, Oregon you could add to the confusion by following up on this.
        >
        > Follow up reply from Nick Carter
        >
        > "Hi Daryl,
        > Like I said, that's all I knew. Dean is an aquaintance from the local
        > craft market that my wife and I sell at. He no longer sells there and I
        > haven't seen him in 10 years. He used to sell toy pop-pop boats so when
        > I did the model engine show I convinced him to bring some of his stuff
        > to show the crowd. The bit pop pop engine is one of the things he brought.
        >
        > Nick"
        >
        > Follow up reply from Dr. Larry Winiarski....
        >
        >
        > "Daryl,
        > I went to see Peter Payne( gosh !! it was more than 30 years ago).
        > True,He did not want to work more on the putt,putt without government support .!
        > However, II felt he did have some good insights about what he thought was important in these devices.two things he did that I would like to do but never found the time is:
        > He had a putt putt water pump that pumped to the top of a two story bulding (i would like to try this with my rocket stove for helping people in developing countries)
        > He made a SINGLE tube putt putt that pushed a man carrying row boat.
        > These were research devices that I think were electrically heated. but i would like to use my rocket stove principles to fire them with wood
        > God Bless
        >
        > Larry
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