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  • sccfan4
    Hey! The name s Corey. I guess you could say I m new but then again maybe I m not. I ve been a part of this group for a few months after I discovered this
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 6, 2009
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      Hey!

      The name's Corey.

      I guess you could say I'm new but then again maybe I'm not. I've been a part of this group for a few months after I discovered this candle powered phenomenon. I'm a 19 year old mechanical engineering college student and have always loved ships, airplanes, and cars. I particularly have enjoyed researching and reading up on World War one and two ships and planes. My favorite ships of this era would be the battleship. I've also had some past experience building paper models and even have tried designing some of my own ship models with decent success (nothing too complicated).

      My younger brothers and I built some pop pop boats from Slater's instructions and had a lot of fun. My current project has me looking into powering a Revell USS Arizona. I'm currently in the building phase. I've been following the group's boat ideas that involve cardstock models and wood and may try that after this if time permits. I also noticed that the discussion talks of only one motor source and I thought I'd share the one I got mine from. Here is the link. http://www.spacetin.com/navigation_bars/Boats.html You can buy 3 small dish type motors for 5 dollars or 25 for $25 (What I did. Figured I and my brothers would use them all eventually.) He also carries a larger type if you have an extra big model.

      I do have a few questions though. Have you any ideas for making oil burners? Preferably easy to make, cheap, easy to find resources etc... I found that candles leave lots of wax which is annoying. :)

      Well I guess that is it for now.

      Thanks!
      Corey
    • David Halfpenny
      ... From: sccfan4 ... Corey, Date a well-groomed Archaeologist - small oil lamps were how the Roman Empire was lit, and billions of
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 6, 2009
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        --------------------------------------------------
        From: "sccfan4" <fanof48@...>

        > Have you any ideas for making oil burners? Preferably easy to make,
        > cheap, easy to find resources etc... I found that candles leave lots of
        > wax which is annoying. :)

        Corey,

        Date a well-groomed Archaeologist - small oil lamps were how the Roman
        Empire was lit, and billions of little clay and metal burners lie smashed
        in landfill. And millions more decorate the bathrooms of modern Woman.

        Here is a tiny soldier's lamp in clay:
        http://frysingerreunion.org/uk/wales2181.jpg

        It has a one-piece body, a filler funnel in the middle, a wick hole at the
        left and a cool pinch-grip at the right. One of the classic design
        masterpieces of all time.

        Use - guess what? - lamp oil. And the same smelly-goods shop will sell you
        a wick if you have no soft string. Candle wick - available from craft
        shops - will serve too, and can be had with little metal "feet" that
        stabilise the wick.

        With a very small boat, you can use the actual hull as the body of an oil
        lamp.

        Use OIL not spirit if you value your hands and eyebrows. While spirit lamps
        work much the same way, spilled spilled on water can flash into a broad
        flame in an instant.


        I've been trying to go in the other direction, and to get better use out of
        a candle. My reason is that small children can upset a pop-pop easily in
        their excitement, and spilled oil can contaminates the bath / paddling pool
        / clothes in a way that spilled wax doesn't. Also some oils can continue to
        burn on the surface of water - even without a wick - while wax instantly
        solidifies and stops burning. On the other hand, the molten wax in the
        burner is a scald hazard.

        I have built some simple wax-vapourising burners, but none safe, compact
        and reliable enough for a small pop-pop.


        For a long duration with a small boat, I have successfully poured molten
        wax into the hull and used it as a candle. A puddle of molten wax forms
        around the wick, with the solid wax forming a container. Be aware that the
        molten wax can flash into a big flare up in some circumstances - again a
        technically minded girl on the team will very often have practical
        experience with candles - usually scented ones.

        David Halfpenny
        England
      • Frank McNeill
        Hi Cory and David, Go to http://tinyurl.com/bk8rxx for something friend Google found a while back when Daryl and I were discussing burners. Frank
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 7, 2009
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          Hi Cory and David,

          Go to http://tinyurl.com/bk8rxx for something friend Google found a while back when Daryl and I were discussing burners.

          Frank


          --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, "David Halfpenny" <dh1@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > --------------------------------------------------
          > From: "sccfan4" <fanof48@...>
          >
          > > Have you any ideas for making oil burners? Preferably easy to make,
          > > cheap, easy to find resources etc... I found that candles leave lots of
          > > wax which is annoying. :)
          >
          > Corey,
          >
          > Date a well-groomed Archaeologist - small oil lamps were how the Roman
          > Empire was lit, and billions of little clay and metal burners lie smashed
          > in landfill. And millions more decorate the bathrooms of modern Woman.
          >
          > Here is a tiny soldier's lamp in clay:
          > http://frysingerreunion.org/uk/wales2181.jpg
          >
          > It has a one-piece body, a filler funnel in the middle, a wick hole at the
          > left and a cool pinch-grip at the right. One of the classic design
          > masterpieces of all time.
          >
          > Use - guess what? - lamp oil. And the same smelly-goods shop will sell you
          > a wick if you have no soft string. Candle wick - available from craft
          > shops - will serve too, and can be had with little metal "feet" that
          > stabilise the wick.
          >
          > With a very small boat, you can use the actual hull as the body of an oil
          > lamp.
          >
          > Use OIL not spirit if you value your hands and eyebrows. While spirit lamps
          > work much the same way, spilled spilled on water can flash into a broad
          > flame in an instant.
          >
          >
          > I've been trying to go in the other direction, and to get better use out of
          > a candle. My reason is that small children can upset a pop-pop easily in
          > their excitement, and spilled oil can contaminates the bath / paddling pool
          > / clothes in a way that spilled wax doesn't. Also some oils can continue to
          > burn on the surface of water - even without a wick - while wax instantly
          > solidifies and stops burning. On the other hand, the molten wax in the
          > burner is a scald hazard.
          >
          > I have built some simple wax-vapourising burners, but none safe, compact
          > and reliable enough for a small pop-pop.
          >
          >
          > For a long duration with a small boat, I have successfully poured molten
          > wax into the hull and used it as a candle. A puddle of molten wax forms
          > around the wick, with the solid wax forming a container. Be aware that the
          > molten wax can flash into a big flare up in some circumstances - again a
          > technically minded girl on the team will very often have practical
          > experience with candles - usually scented ones.
          >
          > David Halfpenny
          > England
          >
        • Donald Qualls
          ... You can make a very simple oil burner with a copper pipe cap (3/4 or 1 size is probably about right) and a short length of brass or copper tube. Solder
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 7, 2009
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            sccfan4 wrote:
            >
            > I do have a few questions though. Have you any ideas for making oil
            > burners? Preferably easy to make, cheap, easy to find resources
            > etc... I found that candles leave lots of wax which is annoying. :)
            >
            >

            You can make a very simple oil burner with a copper pipe cap (3/4" or 1"
            size is probably about right) and a short length of brass or copper
            tube. Solder a suitable length of the tube to the inner size of the
            cap, leaving 1/16" or so clearance at the bottom (so oil can get into
            the tube), and make a wick to go into the tube from cotton string or a
            rolled up chunk torn from a paper towel (for extra sophistication, you
            can stuff a small piece of copper mesh into the tube on top of the paper
            towel and make an easily replaced flame holder with cotton twisted from
            the end of a swab). Fill with olive or corn oil (I've been told not to
            use canola, supposedly due to residual toxins -- canola is processed
            from rapeseed oil, which is poisonous before processing), and light.
            Use a needle or toothpick to tease the wick out when it needs replacement.

            --
            If, through hard work and perseverance, you finally get what you want,
            it's probably a sign you weren't dreaming big enough.

            Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer http://silent1.home.netcom.com

            Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
            and don't expect them to be perfect.
          • Richard Mundy
            Hi all, I favour Slaters birthday candles. I made a little holder from a tinplate spoon with a short length of brass tube soldered on. Works a treat with
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 7, 2009
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              Hi all,

              I favour Slaters birthday candles. I made a little holder from a tinplate 'spoon' with a short length of brass tube soldered on. Works a treat with quick candle changes. Can experiment with increased power by making holder with several bits of brass tube to hold more candles.

              Another possibility is to use the solid fuel tablets for Mamod or Willesco steam toys. These are readily available and not expensive. They may provide too much heat for a small boat though and, if the engine dries out, solder may melt!

              Dick



              --- In pop-pop-steamboats@yahoogroups.com, Donald Qualls <silent1@...> wrote:
              >
              > sccfan4 wrote:
              > >
              > > I do have a few questions though. Have you any ideas for making oil
              > > burners? Preferably easy to make, cheap, easy to find resources
              > > etc... I found that candles leave lots of wax which is annoying. :)
              > >
              > >
              >
              > You can make a very simple oil burner with a copper pipe cap (3/4" or 1"
              > size is probably about right) and a short length of brass or copper
              > tube. Solder a suitable length of the tube to the inner size of the
              > cap, leaving 1/16" or so clearance at the bottom (so oil can get into
              > the tube), and make a wick to go into the tube from cotton string or a
              > rolled up chunk torn from a paper towel (for extra sophistication, you
              > can stuff a small piece of copper mesh into the tube on top of the paper
              > towel and make an easily replaced flame holder with cotton twisted from
              > the end of a swab). Fill with olive or corn oil (I've been told not to
              > use canola, supposedly due to residual toxins -- canola is processed
              > from rapeseed oil, which is poisonous before processing), and light.
              > Use a needle or toothpick to tease the wick out when it needs replacement.
              >
              > --
              > If, through hard work and perseverance, you finally get what you want,
              > it's probably a sign you weren't dreaming big enough.
              >
              > Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer http://silent1.home.netcom.com
              >
              > Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
              > and don't expect them to be perfect.
              >
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